Are these the lookouts?


Jim Currie

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Apr 16, 2008
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NewtonMearns, Glasgow, Scotland.
The following is a blow-up of part of the well-known picture entitled "Titanic leaving Southampton" Any ideas as to who might be in the "Nest"?
upload_2018-9-30_14-56-0.png
 
Nov 14, 2005
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I know that Titanic's logs were lost but would that be a log entry for a ship of that time? Seaman so and so and Seaman whats his name are in the crows nest?
 

Rob Lawes

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Jun 13, 2012
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It would be interesting to go back and review the source photo again. I don't have anything like the software required to sharpen the resolution.

To my eye, the blob on the right is too hard to distinguish from the collection of cables crossing in front and behind the area. There is less clutter in the area of the blob on the left but its still too difficult to pick out a shape.

Interestingly, bright objects such as the bell and the whistle on the funnel in the background stand out quite well and yet, I can't make out faces associated with either of the blobs. Their faces should stand out as they are quite bright in good light and against a dull background.
 

Jim Currie

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Apr 16, 2008
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NewtonMearns, Glasgow, Scotland.
My sentiments, Rob.
Here is a close up of what we should be seeing:
Titanic at Southampton.jpg

As you can see, we should be seeing the stays and shackles running up behind the nest. In the above picture, the rear screen and stanchions have been removed.
 
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May 3, 2005
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Incidentally, I was wondering if anyone had any information on the height above the waterline of the crow's nest on the Titanic and how far the horizon appeared to be for the lookouts in the crow's nest on the Titanic ?

I found some information on another website from an old "Navy Manual For Lookouts" which has a table for estimating the distance to the horizon for various heights from the equation of. :
The distance to the horizon (in miles) is equal to the product of 1.2 (a constant) times the square root of the observer (in feet above the waterline).
There is another equation which uses 1.5 as the constant.
 

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