Arthur May and Arthur William May


Mike Herbold

Member
Dec 13, 1999
1,007
8
313
This is in response to Lorraine Stephanie Brown's query on the "Questions on Crew Member's Name" thread. I thought the Mays question deserved its own thread.

For starters, just about any cemetery in the world will help you locate a gravesite if you give them the name of the party you are looking for and their date of death. You don't need to prove that you are a relative, nor do you need to offer any identification. I rarely offer the fact that the deceased that I'm trying to locate has a Titanic connection (until afterwards, sometimes) nor do I offer what my connection is. I just give them the deceased's name and date of death.

The situation with the Mays' is a little different, however, and somewhat similar to that of two passengers with California roots who died on the Titanic, Walter Miller Clark, and William F. Hoyt. Like the Hays', Clark and Hoyt died in the disaster. Clark's body was never found, and Hoyt's body was buried at sea.

To find the memorials to Clark and Hoyt, it is not enough to know their date of death of April 15, 1912. You need to provide the cemetery office with the name of other relatives who are actually buried in the cemetery. In Clark's case, you ask for the location of his father, J. Ross Clark, or his wife, Virginia McDowell Clark. For Hoyt, you ask for the location of his brothers Charles S. Hoyt (1865-1918) or Gordon C. Hoyt (1863-1943).

So, though I've never been there, I would suggest that the way to find the Southampton memorial to the Hays would be to ask for the location of Alice M. White (died 2-20-1913) or Alice May (died 10-11-1917).

(Incidentally, here's information for those interested in seeing Clark's or Hoyt's "gravesites" in Southern California. The big Clark family crypt is near the southwest corner of Maple Avenue and Midland Avenue within Hollywood Memorial Park Cemetery, aka Hollywood Forever Cemetery. It's on Midland Ave, about 100 ft. from the corner. It's a large stand-alone building about 12 ft tall. The Hoyt marker is just a regular ground level grave marker on the left side of the Rose Ave. entrance to Woodlawn Cemetery in Santa Monica. It is about 100 yards from the entrance, 2 rows from the street, in section 4.)
 
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Lorraine Stephanie Brown

Guest
Hi Mike, i mentioned to Em that i came across 2 gravestones with the May name on them,although i am not 100% sure if they are any relation to the May family that i am looking for.I did take photographs of these graves with the deepest respect for the cemetary & the occupants,and did not realise until later,that photographs were not allowed,which i will not be doing again.once the photographs are developed,i am hoping they will provide further information on the May family.

Kind regards

Lottie
 
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Lorraine Stephanie Brown

Guest
Hi,i have just returned from southampton with my friend Karen May,who is a descendant of the May men who went down on the Titanic,Karens brother informed me that a pocket watch belonging to either May Snr or May Jnr, is in the Newfoundland museum, and claims that an insurance fee is payable if they want the watch returned to them.Could you shed any light as to wether the information is correct.Karens father being the the grandson off May Jnr could claim the watch if the information is correct, apon proof of identity.I would be grateful for any information regarding this issue.

Kind Regard

Lottie
 

Brian Meister

Member
Mar 19, 1999
266
2
263
Dear List Members,

To my knowledge the body of neither May
was among those found at sea. There is a
notation concerning body number 141 which
says "white coat marked 'A. May'" and
carrying keys marked 'Butcher' He was aged 30.
There was also an address for a married lady
in Belfast. The age fits neither man, and
it is doubtful that either knew anyone in
Belfast since they were Hampshire born.
The identity of body 141 has been assigned
through the years as Alfred Maytum, chief
Butcher, but this man was half Maytum's age.
Since both Mays' were assigned to the
Engine Department on Titanic, it is doubtful
that they would have ended up with the keys
to the Butchers' larder.
It will be extremely hard to prove that
body 141 was either Arthur or Arthur William
May.

Respectfully,

Brian Meister
 
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Lorraine Stephanie Brown

Guest
Hello again,i understand what your saying regarding the May bodies never being recovered,however does this mean the information David May gave me regarding a pocket watch could be incorrect.I would be interested to know how he got the information on the watch and the Newfoundland Musuem.Also who originally had the memorial grave erected all those years ago for the May men.

Any help would be gratefully recieved.

Kind Regards
Lottie
 

Brian Meister

Member
Mar 19, 1999
266
2
263
Dear Lottie,

I am sure that the grave stone was erected by
the family. I have the text here somewhere,
and I expect it was put up when the next
relative died. As for the watch, there is not
one listed in the effects. Sorry I can not
elaborate further.

Brian
 

John Avery

Member
Aug 4, 2005
15
0
131
I would like to clarify a point for researchers of Titanic associated graves in Southampton [and in particular the Old Cemetery by The Common where there are 47 graves associated with the Titanic]. The burial plot records are held at Southampton City Council Burial and Bereavement Services located in Bugle Street [behind the Maritime Museum]. A duplicate set is held at the Hawthorns Wildlife Centre which is 10 minutes walk from the Old Cemetery.
None of the bodies were returned to Southampton as [1] some were not recovered [2] some buried at sea [3] some buried at Halifax NS. The records held are BURIALS so by definition the names will not appear on the council's records. Usually when a spouse or other relative died later, the family took it as a suitable occasion to record the Titanic death.

The Hampshire Genealogical Society undertook a survey 30 years ago of Monumental Inscriptions though to clarify especially for overseas researchers they entitled it Hill Lane Cemetery
which is an alternative [now lesser used name]. The council set out its plot numbers 1, 2, 3, etc and within each plot allocated various graves and these show up on more detailed enlarged plot maps. The complication arises that for reasons not quite clear [it has been suggested that 30 years ago the council would not cooperate by releasing plot details] the HGS used their own reference system such as AA 546.
Until recently it has meant trawling throughout the HGS microfiche in the hope by reading each entry in the hope of spotting the name Titanic.
Geoff Watts, City Tourist Guide and a founder member of Friends of Old Southampton Cemetery [a conservation group manned by volunteers] has devised a grid that helps to place HGS references into the original plots used by the council.
In addition Brian Ticehurst has published a list of Titanic graves found in the Old Cemetery. Readers will not be surprised to learn that both sources are from time to time in need of updates as FoSOC either uncover existing graves or occasionally 'discover' more associated with the Titanic. We keep in regular touch with both Brian and HGS, updates his list it is logistically more difficult for the microfiche to be updated regularly. One example was than when the HGS volunteers conducted their survey they accurately recorded the face or front of the stone but we found the reference to the Titanic on the rear and this had been overlooked. With 116,300 burials in the 27 acres this is not surprising, my comments are not a complaint but merely to illustrate how things can be overlooked.
Friends of Southampton Old Cemetery are always pleased to assist including guided walks around the cemetery.
John G. Avery secretary FoSOC

http://friendsoldcemetery.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/
 

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