Arthur William Barringer victualizing steward


Ralph Dellar

Member
Apr 15, 2000
13
1
213
AW was one of my English granny’s older brothers according to 1881 UK census CD. (Not found in 1901 UK census yet.)

Does any lister (such as Brian T) have more info about AW, his spouse or his children?
Or is any lister related to him?
Is there a crew photo that may show him?

I last posted several messages to this site (under an older email account) in 2000. I have not been actively reading posts since 2001.

If sending a PRIVATE MESSAGE, please include "BARRINGER" in the subject line or your message may be blocked by my spam filter.
(If you have a crew photo to share, please contact me first BEFORE sending as an attachment so I can clear some space to receive it.)

Thank you in advance from the "Windy City"
 
Apr 27, 2003
419
3
183
Ralph - here is some information below that should keep you happy:

Barringer, Arthur William. Elisingor, Bath Street, Inner Avenue, Southampton. Saloon Steward. 33. (Cambridge).
(In memorium Southern Daily Echo, 29th April, 30th April, 30th April, 1st May 1912 and Hampshire Independent 4th May 1912)
Barringer, Arthur William. Dearly loved Husband of Ethel Barringer, Elsinore, Bath Street Bevois Town, (Late of 52 Padwell Road).
Probate Report: Barringer, Arthur William, Elsingore, Bath Street, Southampton. Probate - Winchester to Ethel Isabel Barringer. Estate £232 19s 11d.
(From: Mansion House Titanic Relief Fund Booklet, March 1913)
Number 299. Barringer, Ethel Isabel, Widow. Dorothy, Ethel and Eric, children. All class D dependants.
(From the Minute Book of the White Star Company)
The White Star Company had a Committee meeting on 23rd July 1912 at 10 Winter Street, Liverpool at 11.55am. Present Mr. J. Bruce Ismay (in the chair) and others.
During the meeting it was announced that the following cases were reported together with amounts paid into Court:
A. W. Barringer - 1st Class Steward - Wages £3 15 0d - dependants - Widow and 2 children - £300.
(From the Titanic Relief Fund Minute Book number 2, Southampton Area)
Date June 3rd 1913.
Case number C299. Decision that a grant of £3 be made from the Compassionate Fund.
(From the Titanic Relief Fund Minute Book number 2, Southampton Area)
Date January 29th 1914.
Case number C299. Mrs. Barringer remarried on 14th January 1914 and the usual allowance was paid.
(From The Cambridge Independent Press, April, 19, 1912, page 5).
Mr. Arthur William Barringer, son of Mr. William Barringer, of 15 Thoday Street, Cambridge, was a Steward on the Titanic. It is hoped that he may be among those of the crew who were rescued, but his name has not appeared among the survivors. Mr. Barringer, who was 34 years of age, and has a wife, had been at sea for 15 years, and had served on the Briton, the Norman, the Guscho, the St. Paul, the New York, the St. Louis, and the Olympic. He was on the last named vessel at the time of the collision with the Hawke, after which he, with the captain and several of the crew, transferred to the Titanic. He last came to Cambridge two years ago.
(From the Cambridge Chronicle April 19th, 1912, page 5).
Cambridge man aboard
It is feared that a Cambridge man was among those who lost their lives, and great anxiety is felt by his parents, who live in Cambridge, and relatives and close friends, as to his safety. We refer to Mr. A. W. Barringer, a native of Cambridge, who went out on the Titanic on her maiden voyage in the capacity of steward. on Wednesday his wife, who lives at Southampton, and has two children, telegraphed to her husband's father to the effect that she had not then received any news as to whether her husband was alive or not. Nothing definite had been heard up till last (Thursday) night. Mr. William Barringer, the father, lives at 13 Thoday Street, Cambridge, and is an ex-constable, having served for twenty-five years in the Borough Police. He is now employed at Histon by Messrs.. Chivers and Sons.
Mr. Barringer, jun., left Cambridge some fifteen years ago, when he joined the Union Castle Line at Southampton. He was afterwards connected with the American line, and for some years he has been employed by the White Star line. Among the famous vessels on which he has held the position of steward are the Adriatic and the Olympic.
(From the Cambridge Chronicle April 26th, 1912, page 5).
A Cambridge Victim
Mr. A. W. Barringer
(with photo)
The greatest sympathy is felt with the relatives of Mr. A. W Barringer, whom as reported in last week's issue, was amongst those who lost their lives in the terrible Titanic disaster. The deceased, who was on board in the capacity of a steward, was a Cambridge man, his parents residing at 13, Thoday Street. He leaves a widow and two children to mourn their loss. At the evening service at St. Philip's Church on Sunday, Mr. Barringer's favourite hymn, ''Lead Kindly Light,'' was impressively sung.

Best regards Brian
 

Ralph Dellar

Member
Apr 15, 2000
13
1
213
Thank you Brian - this is more information than I thought was available 3 years ago, and available so quickly. Are you publishing a book on the crew?
In your post it implied that there was a photo of AW in this article "(From the Cambridge Chronicle April 26th, 1912, page 5)".
Is this photo, or this article available, either on-line or through a private collection, or is the quality too faded or poor to view?

Is "Elisingor" (listed for AW) and "Elsinore" (listed for Elinor, his widow) the same place (but a spelling typo) or two different places?
Ralph from the "Windy City"
 
Apr 27, 2003
419
3
183
Ralph,
Glad you found the information useful.
The photograph in the Cambridge Chronicle I had once was a photostat of the microfiche and quite honestly could have been anyone. I would think it is still available from the Cambridge Library if you asked them.
Elisingore - the name of his house in Bath Street is spelt differently in different sources - I will go and check to see if the house name still exists.
Writing a book on the crew? No - I now have far far too much information for that.
Cheers

Brian
 
Apr 27, 2003
419
3
183
Ralph,
I visited Bath Street, Southampton today and yes the house named ''Elsinore''is still there with the name carved out in stone above the front porch.
Basically the house is the same as in 1912 and at present it is in a pretty run down state. The whole street was renumbered years ago and the number allotted to Elsinore is no. 24.
So we can now correct his entry.
Best regards


Brian
 

Ralph Dellar

Member
Apr 15, 2000
13
1
213
Thank you ever so much Brian for the info in your last two postings. I had not expected that you would walk/drive to check out the actual building - is it located on Bevois Mount area between Middle St and Cliff Road (at the top of the Baekker map of 1910 Southampton that is posted on the site) or above Middle St.
What kind of building - a small house, a large house converted into a multi-family dwelling, ...?

Also AW (and presumably his family) lived at 52 Padwell according to the crew sign-on info. Where is that in relation to the Docks area - I could not spot it on the 1910 map so it may be one of the smaller unnamed side streets.

I had seen his widow Ethel referred to as "Ethel of Elsignore" and I originally assumed that it either related to where she was born (now obviously not) or that she had been an actress with a pretentious title.
I had not noticed the information you posted to me in the online bios for Arthur or other crew? Are there plans for Phil Hind to expand the bios to include widow and children (posted in the message board since they are "public record" (newspapers)), or is there a copyright or privacy issue with doing that.

Thanks again from Ralph in the "Windy City"
 
Apr 27, 2003
419
3
183
Ralph,
It was no problem visiting Bath Street - it is only a very few minutes from my residence here.
Your questions - yes, it is in the Bevois Mount area and almost adjoins Padwell Road.
In 1912 the area was and is still known as the ''Inner Avenue'' area and row after row of streets of small houses were erected to house the mass of people flocking to Southampton to work on the liners etc.
Elsinore, Bath Street is in the middle of a terrace of about 30 houses and consists of two bedrooms and two downstairs rooms (two up - two down) a bathroom, kitchen and small back garden with rear access.
Today the house is (by its general state) occupied by an elderly couple as the small front garden is very overgrown and the house has an unkempt appearance. The whole area (Inner Avenue) is now a quite up market area and is generally very smart.
From the Inner Avenue to the Docks it would take about 20 minutes to walk but in 1912 there was a very frequent Electric Tram Service (cost 1 old penny) and the journey took about 5 minutes.
Best regards

Brian
 

Similar threads

Similar threads