Ash Ejectors

Cam Houseman

Cam Houseman

Member
Hi Cam,


I'm not so sure. After consulting my copy of TTSM Volume 1, it does not appear that they have anything to do with the ballast, bilge pumps, or soil pipes.
Hey Jason,

Ah, thank you. I should consult my copy as well. Thanks for the tip/help!
I do not think those portholes are involved with the Ash Ejectors personally, as those were Located on E-Deck, and had a stairwell down to F-Deck, presumably for dumping the ash there?
 
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Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

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Ah, thank you. I should consult my copy as well. Thanks for the tip/help!
You're welcome!

I do not think those portholes are involved with the Ash Ejectors personally, as those were Located on E-Deck, and had a stairwell down to F-Deck, presumably for dumping the ash there?
On E-Deck, yes the ash could be dumped through doors on the ship's side to the pier or a barge.
 
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Bill West

Member
Two items for RJ Letrent's post#27 about the many outlets near the waterline:
-TRMA Reference Library - Titanic Research Articles has "Olympic Discharges" in the bottom group. This is a list Ralph Currell found of all the sanitary outlets.
-OlyEngrOutletsR1.pdf attached is a parallel list I made of all the engineering outlets that I could find on the various plans.

The 2 lists tally to a surprising 700 holes in the hull. Sure made for a lot of inspection during annual drydocking!

Bill
 

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RJ Letrent

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Two items for RJ Letrent's post#27 about the many outlets near the waterline:
-TRMA Reference Library - Titanic Research Articles has "Olympic Discharges" in the bottom group. This is a list Ralph Currell found of all the sanitary outlets.
-OlyEngrOutletsR1.pdf attached is a parallel list I made of all the engineering outlets that I could find on the various plans.

The 2 lists tally to a surprising 700 holes in the hull. Sure made for a lot of inspection during annual drydocking!

Bill
Thank you for the explanation... amazing stuff.
 
Shelly Steig

Shelly Steig

Member
I've been fascinated by the knowledge of people on this forum! Regarding the Ash Place and the Ash Doors - could the doors possibly be opened while at sea? I'm working on a kid's book and I need an escape route from the ship. Or any other ideas of how a kid could escape off the ship while at sea? Thanks!!
 
Steven Christian

Steven Christian

Member
I've been fascinated by the knowledge of people on this forum! Regarding the Ash Place and the Ash Doors - could the doors possibly be opened while at sea? I'm working on a kid's book and I need an escape route from the ship. Or any other ideas of how a kid could escape off the ship while at sea? Thanks!!
The ash ejection system wouldn't be a viable means escape. If you look at some of the pics in the link below you'll know what I mean. A person couldnt fit thru the equiptment. When you say escape at sea do you mean during the sinking or before that? Cheers.
 
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Keith H

Keith H

Member
There were doors in the side of the ship at ash place's that could be opened at sea , they were there for removing bags of ash when in port as you wouldn't use ash ejectors at the quayside , another escape route for kids would be a door on "E" deck to the boiler room then a ladder up to the base of the forth funnel on the boat deck .
 
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Shelly Steig

Shelly Steig

Member
The ash ejection system wouldn't be a viable means escape. If you look at some of the pics in the link below you'll know what I mean. A person couldnt fit thru the equiptment. When you say escape at sea do you mean during the sinking or before that? Cheers.
Hi Steven, thanks so much for responding! I really appreciate it. The plans I have show an actual 5'4" by 2'3" door leading from the exterior of the ship to the interior on all four of the ash rooms. I need the main character to get off the ship prior to striking the iceberg, not during the sinking. Thanks for any insight!
 
Shelly Steig

Shelly Steig

Member
There were doors in the side of the ship at ash place's that could be opened at sea , they were there for removing bags of ash when in port as you wouldn't use ash ejectors at the quayside , another escape route for kids would be a door on "E" deck to the boiler room then a ladder up to the base of the forth funnel on the boat deck .
Thank you Keith! I just found your response also. I really appreciate you taking the time to answer my question. That is very helpful!
 
Samuel Halpern

Samuel Halpern

Member
Get off the ship would be easy, but then what? The vessel was moving at 22 knots through the water.
 
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Steven Christian

Steven Christian

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Hi Steven, thanks so much for responding! I really appreciate it. The plans I have show an actual 5'4" by 2'3" door leading from the exterior of the ship to the interior on all four of the ash rooms. I need the main character to get off the ship prior to striking the iceberg, not during the sinking. Thanks for any insight!
Outside of smuggling a small inflatiable raft in his luggage I can't think of anything that would be plausible. Even that would have all kind of problems. If he wanted to disappear his best bet would be to check aboard and then find a way to sneak off Titanic while she was still in Southampton, Cherbourg, or Cobb. Cheers.
 
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Samuel Halpern

Samuel Halpern

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Outside of smuggling a small inflatiable raft in his luggage I can't think of anything that would be plausible. Even that would have all kind of problems. If he wanted to disappear his best bet would be to check aboard and then find a way to sneak off Titanic while she was still in Southampton, Cherbourg, or Cobb. Cheers.
Did they have inflatable rafts in 1912? Why would anyone try to get off the ship in whatever floatable craft while in the middle of the Atlantic? Unless, "Beam me up Scotty!"
 
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Steven Christian

Steven Christian

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Did they have inflatable rafts in 1912? Why would anyone try to get off the ship in whatever floatable craft while in the middle of the Atlantic? Unless, "Beam me up Scotty!"
I'm not sure if they had them. I can't think of reason why one would want to bob around the open sea. Especially when it's cold. I guess the novelist will have to come up with a good reason. I cant think of one. But then again I remember reading one of Clive Cussler's books where Dirk Pitt escaped a sinking ship in a bath tub with an outboard motor strapped on it. So....:D
P.S...got curious and went and looked. Seems the first rubber rafts go back to the 1840's. Cheers.
 
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Shelly Steig

Shelly Steig

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I'm not sure if they had them. I can't think of reason why one would want to bob around the open sea. Especially when it's cold. I guess the novelist will have to come up with a good reason. I cant think of one. But then again I remember reading one of Clive Cussler's books where Dirk Pitt escaped a sinking ship in a bath tub with an outboard motor strapped on it. So....:D
P.S...got curious and went and looked. Seems the first rubber rafts go back to the 1840's. Cheers.
Hi Steven and Samuel - this is an alt-history/fantasy, so there is a big plot twist. It's aimed at kids 10 to 12, so lots of room for the fantastical!
 
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Steven Christian

Steven Christian

Member
Hi Steven and Samuel - this is an alt-history/fantasy, so there is a big plot twist. It's aimed at kids 10 to 12, so lots of room for the fantastical!
Yes you mentioned earlier it was a kids book. However fantastical it is I say go for it. Outside of writing about something like how to troubleshoot a motor control circuit I'm not very good at writing so I envy anybody who can do it. Cheers.
 
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