Aspinall Governor

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Bill West

Member
Cian's fine graphics under "3D Models/Titanic's Reciprocating Engines" have reminded me of an engine detail that has not been modelled and that is the Aspinall governor. Back on the old TRMA site we discussed the governor and I posted these sketches, I thought they may be of interest here. Mr. Aspinall did a very nice job of designing this device.

Aspinall


Sources:
-1894 patent , an earlier model
-Two advertisements
-"Engineering" (London 1866- ) Feb 27, 1914 Vol 97 ISSN: 0013-7782. article "The White Star Liner "Britannic"" pg273-283 plates 22-33
Plate 28, Fig 31 shows the engine side elevation and Fig 33 shows the engine cross section aft of port HP
Also shown in the French journal "Le Génie Civil" . These show the shape and size of the lever arm. I think the end links to a post on the bottom outboard tip of the crosshead body. The rev counter linkage on the front of the engine is suggestive of a possible connection style for this.
-The Marine Steam Engine , Sennett & Oram 1913 pg.399
-The Steam-Engine and Other Steam-Motors , Robert C.H. Heck pg.431. As a bonus, the Proell governor used on the turbine is mentioned on pgs. 368 and 396. It shows that while in simplistic terms the Proell is another flyball governor, a review of its calculations shows that it will give closer regulation.

Back to the reciprocating engines, the governor was not the primary controlling device at sea. I expect the Trans-Atlantic express ships tended to run at 75-90% power and any unintended increase in revs would be met with a much greater increase in prop load. The governor was for when rough seas rapidly unloaded the engines by lifting the stern & prop out of the water. Racing because of prop shaft breakage was the other use for a governor, more than one ship was sunk by a broken shaft going through the hull alongside it.

A number of approaches were tried in the 1890's to deal with these problems. Later multiple expansion engines did not race as quickly but governors continued to be a good idea. An adaptation of Aspinall's design was also applied to turbines and they later gained a revived popularity on Doxford diesels that lasted until 1980.

Our governor's control was through a throttle engine. From the "Engineering" drawings this is my estimate of its arrangement:
ThrtlEng

These throttle engines are not mentioned in period texts but one appears in drawings for the Adriatic's engines, "The Engineer" Sept 13, 1907 pg271.

Bill
 
Stephen Carey

Stephen Carey

Member
I well remember the Aspinal governors on Doxford engined ships. As the prop came out of the water there was a crashing noise from the back of the engine as the governor shut off the fuel supply, then another crash as it set the fuel back on again. This was at speeds below overspeed which latter would shut the engine down, necessitating a hurried restart....
 
Andy A Carter

Andy A Carter

www.andycarter.net
Member
Cian's fine graphics under "3D Models/Titanic's Reciprocating Engines" have reminded me of an engine detail that has not been modelled and that is the Aspinall governor. Back on the old TRMA site we discussed the governor and I posted these sketches, I thought they may be of interest here. Mr. Aspinall did a very nice job of designing this device.

View attachment 110396

Sources:
-1894 patent , an earlier model
-Two advertisements
-"Engineering" (London 1866- ) Feb 27, 1914 Vol 97 ISSN: 0013-7782. article "The White Star Liner "Britannic"" pg273-283 plates 22-33
Plate 28, Fig 31 shows the engine side elevation and Fig 33 shows the engine cross section aft of port HP
Also shown in the French journal "Le Génie Civil" . These show the shape and size of the lever arm. I think the end links to a post on the bottom outboard tip of the crosshead body. The rev counter linkage on the front of the engine is suggestive of a possible connection style for this.
-The Marine Steam Engine , Sennett & Oram 1913 pg.399
-The Steam-Engine and Other Steam-Motors , Robert C.H. Heck pg.431. As a bonus, the Proell governor used on the turbine is mentioned on pgs. 368 and 396. It shows that while in simplistic terms the Proell is another flyball governor, a review of its calculations shows that it will give closer regulation.

Back to the reciprocating engines, the governor was not the primary controlling device at sea. I expect the Trans-Atlantic express ships tended to run at 75-90% power and any unintended increase in revs would be met with a much greater increase in prop load. The governor was for when rough seas rapidly unloaded the engines by lifting the stern & prop out of the water. Racing because of prop shaft breakage was the other use for a governor, more than one ship was sunk by a broken shaft going through the hull alongside it.

A number of approaches were tried in the 1890's to deal with these problems. Later multiple expansion engines did not race as quickly but governors continued to be a good idea. An adaptation of Aspinall's design was also applied to turbines and they later gained a revived popularity on Doxford diesels that lasted until 1980.

Our governor's control was through a throttle engine. From the "Engineering" drawings this is my estimate of its arrangement:
View attachment 110397
These throttle engines are not mentioned in period texts but one appears in drawings for the Adriatic's engines, "The Engineer" Sept 13, 1907 pg271.

Bill
Great post Bill, really interesting.

Regards
Andy
 
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