Assistance

Rob Lawes

Member
Jun 13, 2012
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I take it you mean while Titanic was still afloat?

In which case not a lot. The days of mobile pumps and damage control teams were a long way off and mostly confined to Navies and the influx of water into her hull was too great for any amount of help.
 
Dec 4, 2000
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Personally, it's my opinion that John's question (above) hits the nail on he thumb. It's the "Ouchy" question that was avoided at all costs in 1912 and has continued to be ignored. Was there more that could have been done? Perhaps Titanic was lost, but would it have been possible with the knowledge and equipment aboard to have prolonged the life of the ship?

Even so, the kind of damage control which can be applied in even nondescript small vessels today far exceeds the knowledge and equipment available to Chief Engineer Bell and his men.

-- David G. Brown
 
Oct 11, 2018
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Yes...while still afloat. I hear over and over.....If some ship was closer.....but I don't know what else a close ship could have done besides pickup survivors in the lifeboats....If the Titanic was merely disabled...there might have been time to ferry all the passengers off....



I take it you mean while Titanic was still afloat?

In which case not a lot. The days of mobile pumps and damage control teams were a long way off and mostly confined to Navies and the influx of water into her hull was too great for any amount of help.
 

mitfrc

Member
Jan 3, 2017
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Titanic's crew might have fully loaded the boats in confidence that the steamer standing off would calm people and prevent a rush at the gangways. Boats of the steamer standing off would be used to rescue people from the gangways. Boats would offload people and then pull back for more. When Titanic sinks, the boats would still stand off to avoid being swamped, but not carrying passengers they would move in sooner and more aggressively to save those in the water. The rescuing steamer herself would very slowly steam into the mass in the water and halt with nets rigged, which would predominantly save strong and fit young men.
 
May 3, 2005
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What else could have assisting ships done besides pick up the survivors in the lifeboats ?
If you mean after Titanic had sunk ?
Provide medical help, food and drink, space for rest and transportation to New York.

Which brings up a question.
Were all some 700 odd survivors taken inside the ship for shelter from the weather or did some remain outside on the open decks ?
 
May 3, 2005
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Personally, it's my opinion that John's question (above) hits the nail on he thumb. It's the "Ouchy" question that was avoided at all costs in 1912 and has continued to be ignored. Was there more that could have been done? Perhaps Titanic was lost, but would it have been possible with the knowledge and equipment aboard to have prolonged the life of the ship?

Even so, the kind of damage control which can be applied in even nondescript small vessels today far exceeds the knowledge and equipment available to Chief Engineer Bell and his men.

-- David G. Brown
I think Mersey ignored the question when he said ''Many , if not all , could have been saved if Californian had answered Titanic's distress and had come immediately to their assistance." (If not correct, something on the order of that quote.)