Astor Cabin debate


Oct 31, 2012
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Astor Cabin discrepancy

I've been searching through the archives of this site and have noticed that there is some debate over what cabin the Astors were in. This site, as well as most Titanic sources place them in C-62/64. This old thread offers a fascinating discussion about why they might not have been in that cabin:

https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.o...lans-cdeck-ddeck-occupant-identification.html

It is brought up in the thread that there is no primary source for placing the Astors in that cabin. That seems to be true, but there is one thing that I didn't see mentioned in that thread, which is the ticket price the Astors paid: According to this website, the Astors paid £247 10s 6d for whatever cabin they occupied. By comparison, the Straus party paid £221 15s 7d for the starboard C-deck parlor suite of C-55/57. Aren't those prices fairly close? The Astors had one more person in their party (a nurse, in addition to a maid and manservant), so it makes sense that theirs was slightly higher. Regardless, both parties paid fares that were much much higher than what most first class people paid.

RMS Titanic :: 1st Class Passengers

Is it possible that scholars have made an educated guess that the Astors occupied C-62/64 because the price they paid for it was almost identical to what the Straus party paid for the other C-Deck parlor suite? That seems like a solid educated guess to me. If the Astors were in C-17/21 (very basic cabins, right?) as theorized in the thread I linked to, then why did they pay close to what the Straus' did when the Straus' occupied one of the four parlor suites? I think the similarity in the ticket fares makes it very likely that the Astors occupied C-62/64.

Also, I'm not sure that I agree with the theory that the Astors avoided the C-62/64 suite because they didn't want "publicity". Did the passengers on Titanic really care who occupied what suite? Also, how would the passengers have even known that C-62/64 was a luxurious cabin? If the doors were shut in the corridor, then your average person would have likely had no clue where the super luxurious cabins were. The people who sailed on Titanic weren't like those of us who have studied it, meaning that they didn't know the ship like the back of their hand. The moment they boarded the ship was probably the first time that most paid any serious attention to her, and I have trouble believing that your average first class passenger would have known that C-62/64 was a luxurious suite. Whereas we can walk the decks in our sleep, the ship would have been a brand new and unfamiliar place for virtually everyone on it. Also, I doubt your average person would hang around in the corridor so that they could get a glimpse of who was going into a particular room.

Furthermore, I don't really think that Peuchen's not mentioning the Astors being near him is solid evidence that they didn't occupy C-62/64. As is mentioned in the thread, Archibald Gracie never once saw the woman who occupied the cabin next door to his. When I was on a cruise, I had no clue who was next door to me.
 
Oct 31, 2012
6
0
31
I posted this in one of the sub-forums but it didn't get any responses, so I figured I'd try here. I'm curious as to what people think about this.

I've been searching through the archives of this site and have noticed that there is some debate over what cabin the Astors were in. This site, as well as most Titanic sources place them in C-62/64. This old thread offers a fascinating discussion about why they might not have been in that cabin:

https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.o...lans-cdeck-ddeck-occupant-identification.html

It is brought up in the thread that there is no primary source for placing the Astors in that cabin. That seems to be true, but there is one thing that I didn't see mentioned in that thread, which is the ticket price the Astors paid: According to this website, the Astors paid £247 10s 6d for whatever cabin they occupied. By comparison, the Straus party paid £221 15s 7d for the starboard C-deck parlor suite of C-55/57. Aren't those prices fairly close? The Astors had one more person in their party (a nurse, in addition to a maid and manservant), so it makes sense that theirs was slightly higher. Regardless, both parties paid fares that were much much higher than what most first class people paid.

RMS Titanic :: 1st Class Passengers

Is it possible that scholars have made an educated guess that the Astors occupied C-62/64 because the price they paid for it was almost identical to what the Straus party paid for the other C-Deck parlor suite? That seems like a solid educated guess to me. If the Astors were in C-17/21 (very basic cabins, right?) as theorized in the thread I linked to, then why did they pay close to what the Straus' did when the Straus' occupied one of the four parlor suites? I think the similarity in the ticket fares makes it very likely that the Astors occupied C-62/64.

Also, I'm not sure that I agree with the theory that the Astors avoided the C-62/64 suite because they didn't want "publicity". Did the passengers on Titanic really care who occupied what suite? Also, how would the passengers have even known that C-62/64 was a luxurious cabin? If the doors were shut in the corridor, then your average person would have likely had no clue where the super luxurious cabins were. The people who sailed on Titanic weren't like those of us who have studied it, meaning that they didn't know the ship like the back of their hand. The moment they boarded the ship was probably the first time that most paid any serious attention to her, and I have trouble believing that your average first class passenger would have known that C-62/64 was a luxurious suite. Whereas we can walk the decks in our sleep, the ship would have been a brand new and unfamiliar place for virtually everyone on it. Also, I doubt your average person would hang around in the corridor so that they could get a glimpse of who was going into a particular room.

Furthermore, I don't really think that Peuchen's not mentioning the Astors being near him is solid evidence that they didn't occupy C-62/64. As is mentioned in the thread, Archibald Gracie never once saw the woman who occupied the cabin next door to his. When I was on a cruise, I had no clue who was next door to me.
 

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