Atlantic

Noel F. Jones

Active Member
May 14, 2002
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The data relates to the deep sea fishing industry. 'Sport fishing' is out of the equation.

The risks to personnel primarily arise from the constant operation of deck machinery while on station, more often than not in heavy weather relative to the size of vessel.

Noel
 
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Mary S. Lynn

Guest
Thank you, Noel. Why is the deep sea fishing industry an exception to the mortality rate of the merchant seaman? I apologize if I have not worded this question correctly. I've read Jung's "Perfect Storm" (who hasn't?) and know that this type of disaster is not a common occurance these days. Thanks.
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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I had heard that the most dangerous occupation was that of Alaskan crab fisherman. It's been a while since I read The Perfect Storm, but I do seem to recall that Jung did discuss how hazardous the job was? He didn't have to look far to find people whose experiences were comparable to what the men on the Andrea Gail went through - with the difference that they survived.

Here's the International Labour Organisation's 1999 report on Health and Safety in the commerical fishing industry that gives commerical fishing fatalites for several countries, allowing easy comparision. In the UK, for example, in 1995-96 there were 77 fatal injuries per 100,000 fishermen. This made it the most dangerous occupation by a significant margin - the next highest rate of fatalies was mining and quarrying at 23.2 per 100,000.

http://www.ilo.org/public/english/dialogue/sector/techmeet/tmfi99/tmfir8.htm
 

Noel F. Jones

Active Member
May 14, 2002
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"Thank you, Noel. Why is the deep sea fishing industry an exception to the mortality rate of the merchant seaman?"

If I understand your question correctly:

The data I referred to is specific to the UK but may safely be extrapolated worldwide. As to why the UK statisticians differentiate between deep sea fishing and merchant seafaring the reason for this is historical. The economics of, and working conditions in, the two industries are quite apart from each other.

It is interesting to see that Mining and Quarrying has supplanted merchant seagoing in the latest statistics. This is probably a reflection of the decline into relative insignificance of the UK flag merchant fleet such that any short-term statistic arising therefrom is no longer a representative sample.

Much of the fleet now comprises cross-channel and short-sea vessels which accrue lesser risk to personnel than vessels engaged in transoceanic worldwide trading, which in the past was the greater part of the industry. Even so, I wouldn't have thought there was much mining in the UK now - that's a much debilitated industry also.

Perhaps an average over a decade will restore the historical status quo.

I hope that helps but, as you might discern, I'm a little out of my territory here.

Noel
 
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Mary S. Lynn

Guest
Great information on both industries, and I thank you for answering my question, Noel and Inger. I'm more familiar with with mining - which is to say not much at all!
 
May 27, 2007
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I had a copy of this at one time on Video. I liked the Man in the wheelchair and his devoted wife and thats about it. Mine was terrible picture quality.
lame.gif
 
Apr 21, 2007
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I bought it in a two VHS set from Brentwood home videos and I never really felt like watching the movie after a couple of minutes of watching it.The music in the beginning really creeped me out (for no apparent reason) It wasn't the worst of Titanic movie and it did have special effect above its time. Lets face it-it not as bad as SOS Titanic!!!!!
[Moderator's note: Edited post to remove copyrighted image. JDT]