Aussie take note More TitanicBritannic TV


Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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For those who have Foxtel, or can bludge a tape, the History Channel has two shows on Friday, 3 November.

They are Titanic: Legend Lives On and Titanic's Lost Sister.

I've no idea what the first show is like. The second is about the very important Carl Spencer expedition to the Britannic wreck. This was the first really thorough look at the wreck and its cause. Not to be missed.

On Sunday, 26 November, the Discovery Channel has a distantly Titanic related show called Iceberg Cowboys. This deals with the business of towing icebergs in the area roughly NW of the wreck. The bergs are a menace to oilrigs. This should be a chance to see what a Labrador Current berg looks like.

The shows are repeated. Check your local times.
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
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353
I'm having senior moments. The show about Britannic turned out to be about a Robert Ballard expedition of some years ago, not the far more important Carl Spencer visit.

Also, the Iceberg Cowboys work to the NE of the wreck, not the NW. Silly me!

The show listed as Titanic: Legend Lives On turned out to be the continuation of Titanic: The Death of a Dream, which was shown some weeks ago.

It was made in 1994, so some of it is superseded by recent work, particularly on the hull breakup.

There are other things to quibble about, such as the statement that the International Ice Patrol blows up icebergs, but there is much that is good in both halves of the show.

We get to see and hear from several survivors, including Edith Haisman, Eva Hart, Milvina Dean, Ruth Becker (Blanchard) and Michel Navratil.

We also get to put faces on names many of us have heard of but never seen. They include Brian Ticehurst, Donald Hyslop, George Behe, Don Lynch, Ken Marschall, Walter Lord, Wyn Craig Wade, Michael McLaughan, John Parkinson, Paul Nargeolet, Jean Louis Michel, Arnie Geller and George Tulloch.

Stanley Tutton Lord and Leslie Harrison make appearances in a fairly impartial treatment of "the Californian affair".

We also meet a few historic figures that some may not have seen photo of, including Carr van Anda and Phillip Franklin. There's a photo of Captain Lord with his pipe that I've never seen.

Perhaps the best part is the second part, which deal largely with the effect the disaster had on Southampton and elsewhere.

In particular, Brian Ticehurst gives the statistics for Southampton losses.

549 men died.
232 women were widowed.
1,239 children lost their fathers.

Overall, the two shows offer a fairly detailed and accurate overall picture of the disaster and its aftermath, up to the point where RMS Titanic became involved. Some will find it moving, particularly in the last half.
 

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