B-Deck Millionare Suites


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He may not have been obliged to buy a ticket, but like Ismay, he almost certainly would have been issued a complimentary ticket. I suppose this would have been done for documentation purposes but be that as it may, there would certainly have been a record of it somewhere if this was the case.

On the other hand, if he was in the habit of strolling aboard as he did with the December 30th sailing, and getting away with it, all this is right out the window. Perhaps Lester Mitcham can help us with this.
 
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A few questions in Reference to the "B" Deck Plan Drawing as shown on the website listed below.:

https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/plans.php?angle=B+Deck

Are the cabins shown in blue those which were combined for suites, such as B52/54/56 ?

Are B52/54/56 and B51/53/55 the cabins on either side of what appears to be the 2nd funnel casing just aft of the forward grand staircase) ?

There does not appear to be a funnel casing for the 4th funnel. Since the 4th stack/funnel was a dummy, am I correct in assuming there would be no need for a funnel casing ?

"A" Deck cabins appear to be numbered only as far as A-37. Am I correct in assuming cabin A-54 in "Titanic (1953)" is another case of historical error ?
 
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Brian R Peterson

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Hi Robert,

First, while the 4th funnel was a dummy, there was still a casing for the turbine engine room vents.

Second, the sitting room B-52 was decorated in Louis XIV, the Cameron movie used the the C-55 sitting room decor of Regence for its B-52, which is incorrect.

The two bedrooms, B-54 and B-56, were both decorated in Empire, which is odd as Titanic never used the same decor twice in adjacent cabins anywhere else on the ship.

Third, the sitting room B-51 on the port side was decorated in Adams, the bedrooms B-53 and B-55 were both done different decors of which I am not familiar as to my knowledge no photos of these cabins on Titanic exist.

Forth, you are correct A-57 did not exist, Titanic's A Deck cabins were numbered 1 through 37, and if you recall, A-36 and A-37 were added during construction and do not appear on the original Titanic plans.

Best Regards,

Brian
 
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>>B-54 and B-56, were both decorated in Empire, which is odd as Titanic never used the same decor twice in adjacent cabins anywhere else on the ship<<

And they didn't here either. B52 was not Louis XIV and B54/56 were not both in Empire style. I'm not really sure why we're talking about styles here given that Robert didn't ask about this.

The staterooms indicated in blue on the plan are the ones that were occupied on Titanic. The ones in blue adjacent to the 2nd funnel are indeed B51/53/55 (on the starboard side) and B52/54/56 (on the port side).

There are many movies that had historical errors and as Brian pointed out the A Deck staterooms were only numbered up to A 37. While later on Olympic staterooms were numbered up to A 46, there was still no A 54.

Daniel.
 
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Hi Brian-

Thanks very much for all the information.

(Re: Your First Note): I have found several other websites since and on some of them the casing for the turbine engine engine room vents is labeled more clearly as such (for the 4th funnel).

(Re; Your Fourth Note): In "Titanic" 1953 : The Sturges Cabin( A-54) is shown as an outside cabin. Of course, this cabin did not actually exist since the numbering only went to A-37. Also, the Astors are shown exiting from a cabin on the opposite side of the corridor, which would have indicated an inside cabin. In the first place, there were no inside cabins on "A" Deck, and in the second place it would have been very unlikely for the Astors to have had an inside cabin.

"Titanic" (1953) seems to be a nitpicker's dream, even though "Titanic" (1997) is by far in first place in the number of nitpicks . LOL.

Thanks for the additional information and especially on A-36 and A-37. A-36 appears to have been occupied by Thomas Andrews on most accounts.

Best Regards to you also,

Robert
 
Jul 20, 2000
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>>In the first place, there were no inside cabins on "A" Deck<<
Robert, If you look at the deck plans on this web-site you will see that is not correct. Or do you mean as across the main fore-aft passageway [?] which also renders "Titanic" 1953 inaccurate in that nearly all of the A-deck rooms opened off of athwartship passageways.

"Titanic" 1953 and [from memory] Cameron's film give the impression of a central passageway, rather than two main fore-aft passageways.
 
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Lester-

>>Robert, If you look at the deck plans on this web-site you will see that is not correct. Or do you mean as across the main fore-aft passageway [?] which also renders "Titanic" 1953 inaccurate in that nearly all of the A-deck rooms opened off of athwartship passageways.

"Titanic" 1953 and [from memory] Cameron's film give the impression of a central passageway, rather than two main fore-aft passageways.<<

My apologies for something of a technical error on my part.

For example.: I meant that if you were walking down one of the corridors along the staterooms on "A" Deck there would be entrances to staterooms on only the outboard side of the corridors and none on the inboard side, the space of which was taken up in large part by the funnel casing. Also, the staterooms appear to be entered
off another hallway athwartship (as you point out) of the main corridor rather than directly from the main corridor. Technically speaking, there would be inside staterooms (that is with no outside port holes.)

Agreed on your point of "Titanic" 1953 and Cameron's as to the impression of a central passageway and entrance to staterooms as stated above. Also Astors stateroom is listed by some authorities as C-17 and C-21 (?)... but definitely not an inside cabin and definitely not on "A" Deck at any case.

My impressions are that those inside staterooms might have been occupied by a Maid or a Manservant.

No doubt a case of "literary license" taken by Negulesco in the 1953 "Titanic" to enable the Astor-Sturges connection. The Astors and the Sturges staterooms appear to be on opposite sides of the main corridor and "A-54" appears in one close-up of the Sturges stateroom.

Regards,
Robert

I'm relying on the following website for my impressions.:


"All I know is what I read in the papers and that's my excuse for ignorance." - Attributed to Will Rogers
(Substitute "The Internet" for "papers" on the above quote.) :)
 

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May 3, 2005
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>>John was the wealthiest man in the world<<

Actually, he wasn't. J. P. Morgan had him beat by a very wide margin in terms of his personal fortune. BTW, he was also 47 years old at the time of his death. <<

Who was the richest man (or woman ?) "Aboard Titanic" on the night of the 14th of April, 1912 ?
 

Bob Godfrey

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Astor's personal wealth at the time of his death was around $100m, which made him certainly the richest man on board. Next in line was Isidor Strauss, with around half that figure. Incidentally, J P Morgan had controlled a business empire worth over a billion dollars, but his personal wealth at the time of his death in 1913 was around $80m, rather less than Astor's. In terms of modern currency values, both men were billionaires but with only about 1/30 of the wealth of Bill Gates!
 
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>>Also, the staterooms appear to be entered off another hallway athwartship (as you point out) of the main corridor rather than directly from the main corridor. Technically speaking, there would be inside staterooms (that is with no outside port holes.)<<
Robert. with the exception of A-1, A-2, A-3, A-4 [and A-36, A-37] they were entered off of the athwartship passageways and with each group of 4 two were outside rooms and two were inside rooms. - Look at your own deck plans.

>>Also Astors stateroom is listed by some authorities as C-17 and C-21 (?)... but definitely not an inside cabin and definitely not on "A" Deck at any case.
My impressions are that those inside staterooms might have been occupied by a Maid or a Manservant.<<
Which inside staterooms? - those on C-deck, or A-deck, or both?
 
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Lester-

>>each group of 4 two were outside rooms and two were inside rooms. - Look at your own deck plans.<<

>>Which inside staterooms? - those on C-deck, or A-deck, or both?<<

I'm looking at the deck plan for "A" Deck in particular. There seem to be outside staterooms and then an inside stateroom adjacent to it as your posting above in regard to "each group of 4...etc.".

>>those inside staterooms might have been occupied by a Maid or a Manservant ?<<

We stayed at Hotel Queen Mary in 1999 in room A-129. According to an old RMS Queen Mary Deck Plan this appears to be a remodeling and combining of staterooms A-85 (which was shown as an outside Sitting Room - as part of A-129 it had the original wood paneling, dressing table and a Queen Size Bed ) and A-87 (which was a small inside stateroom with one bed - as part of A-129 it had a Twin Size Bed and was plainly furnished.) Incidentally the original bath tub in the adjoining bath room had been retained, but not completely operational....only the hot and cold freshwater taps were operational.

I am assuming that A-87 might have been one of staterooms for a Maid or Manservant, and this might have been a similar arrangement on RMS Titanic. A-85 appears to have been part of a suite which was combined with A-83 (Bed Room is shown with two beds) on the original Deck Plan.

Regards,
Robert
 
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Robert,

All of those rooms were for any passenger who cared to book them. If you look at Lady Duff-Gordon and her secretary, they were booked as Mrs Morgan & maid. - Miss Francatelli was on E-deck.

While they were able to be booked by other passengers the only rooms that appear in a Fare Rate booklet as "Servant's rooms" are the inside rooms associated with the two Parlour Suites and the 12 Suites-of-Rooms on B-deck. - Thus Parlour Suite B-51/53/55 with Servant's Room B-101; B-58/60 with "Servant's Room B-62. - With the Suites-of-Rooms the cost of a Servant's room came at a premium - 39 pounds instead of the usual Servant's fare of 15 pounds 10 shillings.

For A-deck put your cursor on each of the inside Blue rooms. With all 8 the name of the passenger who was in that room will appear at the bottom left hand corner of your screen.

I hope that helps,
Lester
 
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Lester-

>>For A-deck put your cursor on each of the inside Blue rooms. With all 8 the name of the passenger who was in that room will appear at the bottom left hand corner of your screen.

I hope that helps,
Lester <<

Thanks ! It does !
Robert
 

Daniel Mullan

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Jan 25, 2006
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Hi all

Did any of the cabins or suites have names, or were they all described by letters and numbers such as A10, B5 etc?

I have been told that 'a suite' on the Titanic was named after two wealthy Belfast brothers named Turner.

Could this be true?

Dan
 
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Brian R Peterson

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Hi Dan,

No the cabins did not have names, they were just known by their deck and cabin number.

Best Regards,

Brian
 

Robert Hall

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Jan 26, 2005
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I hope I do this correctly---
Does anyone know if these premier suites, or indeed any other cabins were booked for the return voyage, how far in advance such bookings might be?
Robert
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Unfortunately, unless somebody was to dig up a copy or even the original of the contract ticket list and any other documents assocciated with bookings, there's just no way to know. Since the return voyage never happened, there was no reason to keep any such list or be especially worried about what happened to it.

I'm not up on how far in advance bookings would be, but I would suppose that White Star would cheerfully take reservations up to several months in advance if they could be reasonably certain of the schedule. They certainly wouldn't hesitate to take bookings at the last minute if there were still cabins to be had. Since I may be mistaken about that, I'll wait for the input of somebody who has better information.
 
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