B-Deck Millionare Suites


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Robert Hall

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Jan 26, 2005
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Just curious. I would think that since travel was not very "spur of the moment" then, there probably were some advance bookings, and that some family attics might just have such paperwork hidden away. Also, if bookings had indeed been made [and paid for] for the return voyage, for example, refunds would have had to be generated.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Well, company paperwork is not likely to be archived in a family attic. At least not at first. What happens to any of it after it's been heaved into the trashcan is anybody's guess. Some of it may have survived that way if it hasn't all been deposited in the local landfill. Unfortunately, a lot of records have disappeared in just that fashion. That includes financial records.

Is it possible that any of it could turn up?

Maybe. With news of some old White Star logbooks turning up in a wall as insulation that came out recently, anything is possible. I just wouldn't hold my breath waiting for it to happen.
 

Robert Hall

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Oh, I realise that such a find would be quite rare. I was just thinking of some material that might have arrived in conjunction with such a booking, especially the parlour suites. Somewhat like the packages one gets in booking a voyage on modern liners. I have no idea if such packages were even issued.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>I have no idea if such packages were even issued.<<

Well, probably not in the sense that we understand. I'd be surprised if the shipping lines didn't have some plans, promotions, or deals of some kind to attract passengers. That's just business in action doing what it takes to promote itself. I doubt however that there would have been any really special documentation above and beyond the call of normal record keeping as to who was assigned to what cabin.

Cabin assignments were of interest to the passengers for obvious reasons, and of course, the stewards who took care of them. Beyond that, the principle legal concern was accurately accounting for who was aboard to the customs and immigration authorities. That particular crowd didn't much care about where a passenger slept and changed his clothes, but they were interested in who was entering the country and what taxes and duties were owed for any goods they brought with them.
 
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Matt Pereira

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I read in one Titanic book I have, I have to go back through my books to get the right name but it said that the unoccupied parlor suit was to be occupied by J.P. Morgan, but he backed out at the last minute. Thats what I read I know its possible its not true.
 
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Brian R Peterson

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Hi Matt,

Several books list this information, I do not remember names off hand, but yes it was reputed that Morgan was to occupy B-52-54-56 and the only reason Ismay got it was because Morgan canceled, so they say.

Best Regards,

Brian
 
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Anna Teresa

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This is not Ismay's cabin...!
This is Cabin C62 ocuppied by John Jacob Astor and her wife
 
Jul 20, 2000
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Anna,

The photograph posted above is not of C-62. See the posts above yours. In particular that of May 20, 2005 - 3:31 pm. Neither were the Astors in C-62. Again see the posts above yours. In particular that of November 15, 2005 - 3:00 pm. Use the link provided.
https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/discus/messages/5662/91282.html?1097383063 It is more likely that the Astors were in C-17 & C-21. - Look in particular at the post of October 6, 2004 - 5:52 am.
 

Lorna Spargo

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Aug 20, 2007
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I have read in several locations that Ismay's suite and the Cardeza suite were called the "millionaire's suites". I don't remember now the exact source of that terminology. Was this an official term for these particular suites (perhaps because of their private promenade), or was this term created in more modern times?

Also, just to clear my head:

1. The Cameron "Titanic" stateroom (although supposedly one of the B deck suites) was decorated based on the Straus' stateroom (C 55-57), correct?

2. Charlotte Cardeza (and son) were in the starboard Parlour suite, B 51-53-55 with the walk-out promenade, and Ismay was in the other, B 52-54-56?

3. Starboard stateroom C 55-57 was "home" to the Straus' while the Port side C 62-64 was empty?

I have read so many different things that I want to make sure that this appears to be the most up-to-date information.
 
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Brian R Peterson

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Hi Lorna,

The Parlor Suites earned the monicker of "Millionaire's Suites" as each cost something to the tune of £400 in 1912, an astonishing amount of money.

1. In the movie "Titanic" Cameron has depicted the B-52 Sitting Room in Regence Decor, which is incorrect - the real B-52 was of Louis XVI/XIV (I forget which), the Regence Sitting Room belonged to C-55, you are correct.

2. Both Parlor Suites had 48' private promenades, and yes the Cardezza family was in the Port Suite

3. C-55/C-57 was booked by the Strauss' and C-62/C-64 were empty except for C-66 which is rumored to be Jack Thayer's cabin.

Best Regards,

Brian
 

Lorna Spargo

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Aug 20, 2007
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Thanks Brian,

I appreciate the confirmation on all of the points. There are so many sources of informationa and they don't all say the same thing. I have seen the B 51-53-55 Parlour Suites listed in various locations as empty, or the "home" of the Astor's, or the "home" of the Cardeza family. It is really nice to be able to have a place where I can begin to sort out the confusion.

Lorna
 

Ben Holme

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Feb 11, 2001
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Hi Lorna and Brian,

B51-53-55 was the starboard suite, occupied by the Cardezas. Ismay occupied the equivelent suite on the port side (B52-54-56) which, as Brian points out, also "accomodated" the fictional Hockley/De Witt Bukater party in the '97 film.

All the best,
Ben
 
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Brian R Peterson

Guest
Ben,

Yes it is the starboard suite - I have not worked with my interactive blueprint project nor have I viewed a set of deckplans in over three years so I am a tad rusty in their placement, however I did verify that the Cardezza Family occupied B51/B53/B55 while J. Bruce Ismay occupied B52/B54/B56.

I also pointed out that in the movie Cameron's cabin and sitting room decor was entirely wrong - the sitting room was the wrong decor as were the bedrooms.

Best Regards,

Brian
 

Rachel Carter

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Mar 23, 2008
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Hello, ET:

I can't remember where I read/heard this little tidbit of information, but it did confuse me and I wanted to sort things out for myself. It was always common fact to me that J. Bruce Ismay took over suites B52, B54, B56 after J. Pierpont Morgan canceled his passage. (As we all know, this was the Hockley/DeWitt Bukater suite as well!)

But I remember some little quote - God only knows from one of the many, many books I've read, or some of the bonus material on my 3-disc Titanic DVD - that no one knows for sure where Ismay stayed while on the Titanic. Is it true, that no one knows?
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Is it true, that no one knows?<<

No, it's not an unknown. The cabin numbers B52/54/56 are correct.

>>It was always common fact to me that J. Bruce Ismay took over suites B52, B54, B56 after J. Pierpont Morgan canceled his passage.<<

This may not be quite the common fact as supposed. Morgan was already in France when the Titanic sailed so it looks like if he had planned on going, he canceled long beforhand.
 
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Brian O'Dell

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B-52,54,56 was occupied by Bruce Ismay and B-53,55,57 was occupied by the Cardeza's if I'm not mistaken. These both had their own Private Promenade and B-52 was in Louis XIV. B-53 was in Adams style and in B-54 and B-56 Bedrooms they were both in Empire while all other Staterooms did not include the same decor in two connecting Cabins. If I am incorrect I am sure Daniel will correct me.
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This is from my book at home put into my own words. I have been brushing up in my Titanic knowledge.
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Brian

I go into this in detail in Vol 2 of “Titanic: The Ship Magnificent” there is also a plan of the B Deck suites which outlines all the styles of each of the cabins. Each style is described and illustrated. :)

In short however, B 52 was in Louis XVI (Seize) style and B 51 in Adam style. B 54 and B 53 were in Empire and Italian Renaissance style (respectively) and B 55 and 56 were in the same H&W-manufactured style.

Hope this helps,

Regards,

Daniel.
 
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Brian O'Dell

Guest
Thanks for the info.
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[Moderator's note: About half a dozen separate threads discussing the B deck suites have been consolidated here. For more about whether Morgan ever intended to make Titanic's maiden voyage, look here. MAB]
 

Cody Gentry

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Feb 6, 2008
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I heard rumors that Ismay himself might have upgraded to the First Class Stateroom with the private promenade. Does anybody have concrete evidence or juxtapositionary material to disprove this assertion?
 

Cody Gentry

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Feb 6, 2008
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Correction* It is the 'Millionaires' Suite - Cabins B52, 54, 56.

[Moderator's note: This message and the one above it, originally a separate thread in a different subtopic, have been moved to this pre-existing thread discussing the same suite. MAB]
 
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