Baptist couple getting married in a Methodist church??


Arun Vajpey

Member
Jul 8, 1999
2,594
982
388
65
Since there was no separate sub-forum for 'Religion' during the era, I decided to post the question here. Also, not being a Christian myself, I don't know the answer and I hope no one is offended.

Back during the Edwardian era, would it have been possible for a young British couple with deep Baptist Church roots in England to get married at a very rural Methodist Church in America? In the particular case that I am looking into, the bridegroom's mother was a Titanic survivor and research thus far suggests that an American Methodist priest might have helped her to obtain early return passage to England at a time when she was in a crisis situation. A few years later, her son and his fiancee, in the process of getting married and relocating to California, went out of their way to a Methodist church in a remote Montana town to have their wedding officiated by that very same priest. It might have been a gesture of gratitude but judging by differences in beliefs, would it have been allowed?
 
Nov 14, 2005
2,307
1,201
308
Since there was no separate sub-forum for 'Religion' during the era, I decided to post the question here. Also, not being a Christian myself, I don't know the answer and I hope no one is offended.

Back during the Edwardian era, would it have been possible for a young British couple with deep Baptist Church roots in England to get married at a very rural Methodist Church in America? In the particular case that I am looking into, the bridegroom's mother was a Titanic survivor and research thus far suggests that an American Methodist priest might have helped her to obtain early return passage to England at a time when she was in a crisis situation. A few years later, her son and his fiancee, in the process of getting married and relocating to California, went out of their way to a Methodist church in a remote Montana town to have their wedding officiated by that very same priest. It might have been a gesture of gratitude but judging by differences in beliefs, would it have been allowed?
From what I know I don't believe it would be problem at all. In those doctrines from what I understand it would be up to the minister/priest/pastor to decide if he wanted to marry a couple. One of the big differences between those 2 is their belief as to when someone should be baptized. But that wouldn't come into play so much with an adult couple. Today there are other issues they are dealing with and some have split over them. Those issues weren't a problem in Titanic's day. The Catholic church is different as they have more stringent rules on who can marry in the church. At least they did. I don't know how they do things today. I'm no expert at all on this but I found most have more in common with each other than differences. Besides my last name I'm a christian although I admit I'm not very good one. Nothing offending about your question. To be honest I would be more interested about their trip to Montana in the early 1900's. Sounds like an adventure to me. Cheers.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Arun Vajpey

Member
Jul 8, 1999
2,594
982
388
65
To be honest I would be more interested about their trip to Montana in the early 1900's. Sounds like an adventure to me.
I am looking into that. I have sent off requests for information to the actual church in Montana where the wedding took place and to the then bridegroom's granddaughter in America (she is, of course, the Titanic survivor's great-granddaughter). There is more to it than that in the overall puzzle.
 

Similar threads

Similar threads