Barrett's "wall of water"?


GabrialMish

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So I have spent far too much time thinking about how Titanic sank, not in the general sense of "water went above the bulkheads", far more specific then that... I try to figure out exactly where the water went, when it went there and how fast it wouldve been flowing.

Ive read the testimonies of the survivors and tonight ill be talking about the gentleman who was in BR6 at the time of the collision then made his way back into BR5, Mr. Barrett. He said he saw water coming into the coal bunker so he closed the door... Later on he says a "wall of water" came out of nowhere causing him, and only him, to abandon the boiler room.
WHERE DID THIS WALL OF WATER COME FROM?

Well, thats obvious youre going to say, "It was the water filling up in the coal bunker & when it got full the door gave way from the water pressure emptying its contents into the boiler room".
Was it though?.....

Heres what I think and why I think it... I dont think there was water in the coal bunker, I dont think he saw a wall of water. I think he was working in BR5 with his crew mates and after some time told them he was going to get something or slipped away when they werent looking and made his way to lifeboats ASAP because he was scared of getting stuck in the bowels of a sinking ship without lifeboats - I cannot fault him for this and that IS NOT the point of this post; It seems like everyone else takes this guys word on what happened that night but I dont, I want to reconcile where the disconnect is exactly - why do so many of you believe his testimony and I dont?
I think his story of BR6 is a cover, an excuse as to why he left BR6 so he didnt have to admit he fled out of fear and be labeled a coward.
 
Apr 25, 2007
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Sunderland, Tyne & Waer
Hi,

People far more in the know will respond better than I in regards to Frederick Barrett but from memory the only iceberg damage visible on the wreck can be seen to extend into the bunker of boiler room 5. So if correct at least this part of his story regarding the bunker filling with water has evidence behind it.

It's true however that only Barrett knows what he did for real that night, we only have his word. I would say that most of what he said in regards to other events that night seem to fit with the statements from others if memory recalls.

All The Best

Michael
 
Mar 22, 2003
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I think his story of BR6 is a cover, an excuse as to why he left BR6 so he didnt have to admit he fled out of fear and be labeled a coward.
You can choose to believe, or choose not to believe, whatever you want, but there were numerous opportunities for him to abandon his post and go topside well before he did. If you want to discredit his testimony you need to do much better than just telling us what you think.
 
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GabrialMish

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So I have spent far too much time thinking about how Titanic sank, not in the general sense of "water went above the bulkheads", far more specific then that... I try to figure out exactly where the water went, when it went there and how fast it wouldve been flowing.

Ive read the testimonies of the survivors and tonight ill be talking about the gentleman who was in BR6 at the time of the collision then made his way back into BR5, Mr. Barrett. He said he saw water coming into the coal bunker so he closed the door... Later on he says a "wall of water" came out of nowhere causing him, and only him, to abandon the boiler room.
WHERE DID THIS WALL OF WATER COME FROM?

Well, thats obvious youre going to say, "It was the water filling up in the coal bunker & when it got full the door gave way from the water pressure emptying its contents into the boiler room".
Was it though?.....https://showbox.bio/ https://tutuapp.uno/ https://vidmate.cool/

Heres what I think and why I think it... I dont think there was water in the coal bunker, I dont think he saw a wall of water. I think he was working in BR5 with his crew mates and after some time told them he was going to get something or slipped away when they werent looking and made his way to lifeboats ASAP because he was scared of getting stuck in the bowels of a sinking ship without lifeboats - I cannot fault him for this and that IS NOT the point of this post; It seems like everyone else takes this guys word on what happened that night but I dont, I want to reconcile where the disconnect is exactly - why do so many of you believe his testimony and I dont?
I think his story of BR6 is a cover, an excuse as to why he left BR6 so he didnt have to admit he fled out of fear and be labeled a coward.
thank you
 

Arun Vajpey

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You can choose to believe, or choose not to believe, whatever you want, but there were numerous opportunities for him to abandon his post and go topside well before he did
Absolutely. I know that it is not being specifically alluded to here, but am I right in thinking that with the WTD closed, the only way out of BR5 was up the escape ladder? I don't think even if they had tried, Barrett and Harvey could have managed to lift poor Jonathan Shepherd up the ladder with his broken leg. I think what happened was that with rapidly increasing flooding of BR5, both Barrett and Harvey tried to get out but only the former made it. He cannot be blamed for that.
 

JTDillon

Member
Apr 3, 2020
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So I have spent far too much time thinking about how Titanic sank, not in the general sense of "water went above the bulkheads", far more specific then that... I try to figure out exactly where the water went, when it went there and how fast it wouldve been flowing.

Ive read the testimonies of the survivors and tonight ill be talking about the gentleman who was in BR6 at the time of the collision then made his way back into BR5, Mr. Barrett. He said he saw water coming into the coal bunker so he closed the door... Later on he says a "wall of water" came out of nowhere causing him, and only him, to abandon the boiler room.
WHERE DID THIS WALL OF WATER COME FROM?

Well, thats obvious youre going to say, "It was the water filling up in the coal bunker & when it got full the door gave way from the water pressure emptying its contents into the boiler room".
Was it though?.....

Heres what I think and why I think it... I dont think there was water in the coal bunker, I dont think he saw a wall of water. I think he was working in BR5 with his crew mates and after some time told them he was going to get something or slipped away when they werent looking and made his way to lifeboats ASAP because he was scared of getting stuck in the bowels of a sinking ship without lifeboats - I cannot fault him for this and that IS NOT the point of this post; It seems like everyone else takes this guys word on what happened that night but I dont, I want to reconcile where the disconnect is exactly - why do so many of you believe his testimony and I dont?
I think his story of BR6 is a cover, an excuse as to why he left BR6 so he didnt have to admit he fled out of fear and be labeled a coward.

Yes, this IS from my post - Dec 6th 2020. Search the forum for wall of water and youll see your post from today and mine from Dec 2020. Only difference is my post had exponentially more substance. You just took some "filler" from my post and present it as the entire argument.
Okay, so you joined the site 4 days ago...and since then youve copied and pasted two different posts from two different people. Mine from Dec 2020, and you copied "Identified Marine Life on or around the deck". I cant quite understand why someone joins a forum like this and copies and pastes two random posts written by other people.... If the posts never got a response itd kinda make sense, maybe you wanted answers so you reposted them or something... but both posts already had replies and you could have just added onto them.

Does anyone else find this odd?
 
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JTDillon

Member
Apr 3, 2020
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You can choose to believe, or choose not to believe, whatever you want, but there were numerous opportunities for him to abandon his post and go topside well before he did. If you want to discredit his testimony you need to do much better than just telling us what you think.

This person literally just copied parts of a post I wrote from Dec 2020 and posted it as their own. They also copied another post written by someone else titled "Identified Marine Life on or around the deck", the account is only 4 days old as well so I just cant really understand why theyre here copying other peoples posts...
Anyway, if youre interested at all my original post has FAR more information to substantiate my belief... I even go so far as to provide the dimensions of the boiler room and the coal bunker, figure out the volume of water and the gallon per minute influx to math to explain how the wall of water didnt make sense

I just think its bizarre this person makes an account, then copies bits and pieces of my post from 2020, and another post from someone else.
And I see people refuting this argument (which is mine) and cringe because they took the most unimportant part of the post, then included another part completely out of place so it comes off as....well, stupid.
 
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JTDillon

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Apr 3, 2020
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Absolutely. I know that it is not being specifically alluded to here, but am I right in thinking that with the WTD closed, the only way out of BR5 was up the escape ladder? I don't think even if they had tried, Barrett and Harvey could have managed to lift poor Jonathan Shepherd up the ladder with his broken leg. I think what happened was that with rapidly increasing flooding of BR5, both Barrett and Harvey tried to get out but only the former made it. He cannot be blamed for that.
Hello, I just wanted to let you know this post is actually a copy and paste from a post I made in Dec of 2020... They copied a small, insignificant portion of my post and pasted it here. Very weird. If youre actually interested in the topic, you can look my post up, it has the same title. I included A LOT more information to support my argument, evidence, math,logic and good old intuition..
OP joined the forum 4 days ago and has copied 2 random posts by two different people and posted them as if they were their own. They even go so far as to respond to comments... They just say "thank you" .

But to respond to your comment, yes the WTDs were closed, the ladders were the only way out. However, I think youre underestimating these guys physical ability. They were hardened men who were accustomed to a lifetime of manual labor, not soft modern guys. In comparison, Im a 30 year old guy who lifts a couple bumbells twice a month.
However, I am positive I could make it up a ladder with one leg, itd be easy, especially with good upper body strength, or even moderate upper body strength....
Id put my good foot on the first stair, then id reach up and grab onto the highest step I could with my hands. Id push off on my good leg and at the same time use my arms to pull myself up, id bend my knee up and land my foot on whichever step I was closest to. The steps are what, 1 foot apart? 1.5 tops? its like doing 1/2 of a pullup with your arms, and using your leg to bunny hop you 1.5 feet to get your foot onto the next peg.
Now add to the problem that its a life and death situation.... hmm.. Im sure he could make it. If not, and everything about the flash flooding is true, which I dont see how it could be (continue reading lol) could he not use the water to help float to the top of the room? There are tons of pipes, bars, etc to hang onto as the water got higher, its not like hed have no control...he could hang on to the wall and rise with the water, then when he gets close enough simply swim or pull yourself to the Scotland road exit. I mean- I am coming up with this crap off the top of my head here. Youre telling me if youre stuck in the flooding bowels of a ship you just give up? No way.


2 people getting him up stairs wouldnt be hard either. Jon would get on the ladder as I said above, one guy is standing behind him, one is at the top of the stairs. One guy helps him when he pulls himself up. Or, he could boost him with his hands, the guy at top pulls him up. Something....anything.
I dont remember the exact details of the injury and what happened... but he either broke his leg moments before the catastrophic tsunami of death appeared, or after getting injured he just kinda stayed where he was. until the ocean appeared out of nowhere....
I have broken my arm before, yeah it hurts. But not enough to stick around in a sinking ship....

Now about your point with the broken leg... with one leg broken that means you still have one good leg. Can you stand on one leg? Okay, can you hop on one leg? I sure can. Easily, and im no athlete.... I can easily hop on one leg across my living room, expecially if i use my arms to lean against a wall... and ESPECIALLY if my life depended on it and I was a physically fit man who shoveled coal for a living.

I just tried finding the exact length of the Boiler rooms but of course this websites deck plans arent working for me on chrome or fire fox. I tried googling it but no luck. Anyway, the boiler rooms were something like 35 feet front to back. He could have hopped on one leg across a 30 foot space to the ladder, and using his arms and hopping, I dont see how a man accustomed to a life a manual labor couldnt do that in a life or death situation... So he just sat and accepted his fate? If not, supporting someone with a broken leg/rolled ankle is a very common and easy maneuver.....




Lets address the rapid flooding, and the wall of water.
The water is allegedly from the coal bunker filling up with water, then giving way. You can check my post for the actual math, but the volume of water that could be held in the bunker is nowhere near the volume of the boiler room, nor would it be able to cause a wall of water that he describes.
He said he saw the wave coming between the boilers, but the coal bunker door was in the right side of the room... I want you to try and picture something... Lets say the closet in your bedroom is full of water. What would happen if the door magically vanished? Can you picture how the water would behave? How it would travel down and outward across the floor? And because your bedroom is significantly wider than the opening of the closet door, the energy in that initial torrent of water concentrated in that 2 foot wide gap rapidly spreads out to fill the room, that would rapidly RAPIDLY diminish the height of the "wave". The energy/momentum for the wave is coming from a 2 foot wide gap in the corner of a room, how would that somehow cause a wave 5-10 feet off to the side of the door? all the energy is from the water moving out of the door into the boiler room, the only place where there would be anything remotely resembling a wave would be directly in front of the door. I hope what im saying makes sense....

That water would come out fast initially, but itd go straight into the floors. The crew walked on metal grates, but there was 2 more feet of room under the 'floor' they walked on designed for coal chunks and dust to fall into. This makes the wave even more dubious. This is better than the Magic Bullet that killed Kennedy!! :p
The wave was something like 3 feet above the floor i believe he said. Well, however tall he claims the wave was, add 2 feet to that. The amount of energy needed to propel a wave that high, while also dispersing in all directions, all from a 2 foot wide gap, from a resoivoir that held barely enough water to fill that 2 foot area under the grates I spoke of... Anyway....

The amount of water, the momentum generated behind the initial torrent of water....none of it adds up to a "wave" as he described it. Even with the additional influx through the hull from the damage its just not adding up, the water would not be rising as fast as he said. Not even remotely close.
Consider this, the iceberg damage in boiler room 6 was far more severe than in boiler room 5, boiler room 5 hardly got knicked...and even boiler 6 with significantly faster flooding and far more damage flooded slowly enough for the other stoker (not Barrett) to stay in BR 6 and finish raking his boilers for something like 10 minutes. Im going off of memory on the small details for forgive me mistake. So in oder for what Barett said to be true, the damage in BR 5 would need to be much worse than in BR 6....

The damage from scraping against an iceberg didnt punch or tear giant gaping holes, it merely dented the iron plates and the rivets which held them tightly together, these deformities would allow water to slip in. The ship took almost 3 hours to sink, and thats even with dozens of open portholes in the bow section to speed up flooding. The initial flooding was slow because the gaps in which the water came through were pretty small, the pressure of the water and the small opening wouldve been basically "spraying" in. Itd look intense, but small gaps between plates beats a ripped hull...



So the full coal bunker empties, then the influx from the tiny amount of damage in boiler room 5..... There is just no way it would have been a 4-5 ft tall wave which engulfed the entire boiler room...


Also, the coal bunker was filling up/had been filled up for about an hour before the infamous wave of doom... The door to the coal bunker was not air/water tight. If you look at photos of the Olympics coal bunker doors (im trying to find one to include, ill keep looking) its clear they were not designed to be water proof. They were large sheets which slid up and down and were meant to keep clumps of coal in the coal bunker. They wouldnt have engineered that to be water tight..
ALSO, Beauchamp stated that while witnessing the flooding of boiler room 6 he saw water ""coming through the bunker door and over the plates"". Because the coal bunker had far less area to fill, it filled faster than outside where the water moved across the 90 foot floor. And the water level rose and he says he say water coming out of it. So we know theyre not water proof.

That being said, Barrett and 2 other men were in BR 5 for about an hour after the collision. At some point a group of firemen come in to help rake the boilers for about 15-20 min.... and in Barrets testimony he never mentions any one noticing a leaky door in the room. He says he saw the water initially filling up the bunker so he closed the door but thats it...until is suddenly gives way. Do you think thats realistic? The door was not only perfectly water proof, but also had just enough strength to maintain its structural integrity right up until it gave....

How would that kind of door just pop out of its metal framing? The door would slowly be deformed from the rising water pressure inside, the leak would get more noticeable and someone would have noticed it. But Barrett is asked if he thinks the door gave way and he basically says "sure, I guess".
If you saw the intial flooding and shut the door to contain said flooding, then saw water leaking out the damned door you closed to hold back the flooding, itd be a definite YES, the water definitely came from the coal bunker door. But his testimony hes asked repeatedly if he thinks the sudden wave of water came from the failure of the coal bunker door , the very place he said he saw water flooding into and despite it seeming SO obvious, he practically refuses to answer. Have you read his testimony?
 

Arun Vajpey

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I just wanted to let you know this post is actually a copy and paste from a post I made in Dec of 2020...
Understood. Looks like the powers that be have as well. :)
I am positive I could make it up a ladder with one leg, itd be easy, especially with good upper body strength, or even moderate upper body strength.
I accept that to make it up a vertical ladder from a flooding room might be possible on one leg for someone with good upper body strength but I have recervations if Shepherd could have made it in time with the other leg broken. I know that there were potentially two able bodied colleagues (Harvey and Barrett) who could have helped Shepherd to get to the ladder fairly easily, but helping hil UP it would have been a rather different story. We don't know how badly Shepherd's leg was broken but if it was one of the longer bones, even the slightest movement would cause excruciating pain. We have also got to consider the narrowness of the ladder and the escape hatch through which it went; the stronger of the other two would have to go-up first and try to oull pne of Shepherd's arms while the other man try to boost from underneath, all the while being concious of the rapidly rising water below them. They might have accomplished it, but it would have been touch and go IMO.
 

Stephen Carey

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Hello, I just wanted to let you know this post is actually a copy and paste from a post I made in Dec of 2020... They copied a small, insignificant portion of my post and pasted it here. Very weird. If youre actually interested in the topic, you can look my post up, it has the same title. I included A LOT more information to support my argument, evidence, math,logic and good old intuition..
OP joined the forum 4 days ago and has copied 2 random posts by two different people and posted them as if they were their own. They even go so far as to respond to comments... They just say "thank you" .

But to respond to your comment, yes the WTDs were closed, the ladders were the only way out. However, I think youre underestimating these guys physical ability. They were hardened men who were accustomed to a lifetime of manual labor, not soft modern guys. In comparison, Im a 30 year old guy who lifts a couple bumbells twice a month.
However, I am positive I could make it up a ladder with one leg, itd be easy, especially with good upper body strength, or even moderate upper body strength....
Id put my good foot on the first stair, then id reach up and grab onto the highest step I could with my hands. Id push off on my good leg and at the same time use my arms to pull myself up, id bend my knee up and land my foot on whichever step I was closest to. The steps are what, 1 foot apart? 1.5 tops? its like doing 1/2 of a pullup with your arms, and using your leg to bunny hop you 1.5 feet to get your foot onto the next peg.
Now add to the problem that its a life and death situation.... hmm.. Im sure he could make it. If not, and everything about the flash flooding is true, which I dont see how it could be (continue reading lol) could he not use the water to help float to the top of the room? There are tons of pipes, bars, etc to hang onto as the water got higher, its not like hed have no control...he could hang on to the wall and rise with the water, then when he gets close enough simply swim or pull yourself to the Scotland road exit. I mean- I am coming up with this crap off the top of my head here. Youre telling me if youre stuck in the flooding bowels of a ship you just give up? No way.


2 people getting him up stairs wouldnt be hard either. Jon would get on the ladder as I said above, one guy is standing behind him, one is at the top of the stairs. One guy helps him when he pulls himself up. Or, he could boost him with his hands, the guy at top pulls him up. Something....anything.
I dont remember the exact details of the injury and what happened... but he either broke his leg moments before the catastrophic tsunami of death appeared, or after getting injured he just kinda stayed where he was. until the ocean appeared out of nowhere....
I have broken my arm before, yeah it hurts. But not enough to stick around in a sinking ship....

Now about your point with the broken leg... with one leg broken that means you still have one good leg. Can you stand on one leg? Okay, can you hop on one leg? I sure can. Easily, and im no athlete.... I can easily hop on one leg across my living room, expecially if i use my arms to lean against a wall... and ESPECIALLY if my life depended on it and I was a physically fit man who shoveled coal for a living.

I just tried finding the exact length of the Boiler rooms but of course this websites deck plans arent working for me on chrome or fire fox. I tried googling it but no luck. Anyway, the boiler rooms were something like 35 feet front to back. He could have hopped on one leg across a 30 foot space to the ladder, and using his arms and hopping, I dont see how a man accustomed to a life a manual labor couldnt do that in a life or death situation... So he just sat and accepted his fate? If not, supporting someone with a broken leg/rolled ankle is a very common and easy maneuver.....




Lets address the rapid flooding, and the wall of water.
The water is allegedly from the coal bunker filling up with water, then giving way. You can check my post for the actual math, but the volume of water that could be held in the bunker is nowhere near the volume of the boiler room, nor would it be able to cause a wall of water that he describes.
He said he saw the wave coming between the boilers, but the coal bunker door was in the right side of the room... I want you to try and picture something... Lets say the closet in your bedroom is full of water. What would happen if the door magically vanished? Can you picture how the water would behave? How it would travel down and outward across the floor? And because your bedroom is significantly wider than the opening of the closet door, the energy in that initial torrent of water concentrated in that 2 foot wide gap rapidly spreads out to fill the room, that would rapidly RAPIDLY diminish the height of the "wave". The energy/momentum for the wave is coming from a 2 foot wide gap in the corner of a room, how would that somehow cause a wave 5-10 feet off to the side of the door? all the energy is from the water moving out of the door into the boiler room, the only place where there would be anything remotely resembling a wave would be directly in front of the door. I hope what im saying makes sense....

That water would come out fast initially, but itd go straight into the floors. The crew walked on metal grates, but there was 2 more feet of room under the 'floor' they walked on designed for coal chunks and dust to fall into. This makes the wave even more dubious. This is better than the Magic Bullet that killed Kennedy!! :p
The wave was something like 3 feet above the floor i believe he said. Well, however tall he claims the wave was, add 2 feet to that. The amount of energy needed to propel a wave that high, while also dispersing in all directions, all from a 2 foot wide gap, from a resoivoir that held barely enough water to fill that 2 foot area under the grates I spoke of... Anyway....

The amount of water, the momentum generated behind the initial torrent of water....none of it adds up to a "wave" as he described it. Even with the additional influx through the hull from the damage its just not adding up, the water would not be rising as fast as he said. Not even remotely close.
Consider this, the iceberg damage in boiler room 6 was far more severe than in boiler room 5, boiler room 5 hardly got knicked...and even boiler 6 with significantly faster flooding and far more damage flooded slowly enough for the other stoker (not Barrett) to stay in BR 6 and finish raking his boilers for something like 10 minutes. Im going off of memory on the small details for forgive me mistake. So in oder for what Barett said to be true, the damage in BR 5 would need to be much worse than in BR 6....

The damage from scraping against an iceberg didnt punch or tear giant gaping holes, it merely dented the iron plates and the rivets which held them tightly together, these deformities would allow water to slip in. The ship took almost 3 hours to sink, and thats even with dozens of open portholes in the bow section to speed up flooding. The initial flooding was slow because the gaps in which the water came through were pretty small, the pressure of the water and the small opening wouldve been basically "spraying" in. Itd look intense, but small gaps between plates beats a ripped hull...



So the full coal bunker empties, then the influx from the tiny amount of damage in boiler room 5..... There is just no way it would have been a 4-5 ft tall wave which engulfed the entire boiler room...


Also, the coal bunker was filling up/had been filled up for about an hour before the infamous wave of doom... The door to the coal bunker was not air/water tight. If you look at photos of the Olympics coal bunker doors (im trying to find one to include, ill keep looking) its clear they were not designed to be water proof. They were large sheets which slid up and down and were meant to keep clumps of coal in the coal bunker. They wouldnt have engineered that to be water tight..
ALSO, Beauchamp stated that while witnessing the flooding of boiler room 6 he saw water ""coming through the bunker door and over the plates"". Because the coal bunker had far less area to fill, it filled faster than outside where the water moved across the 90 foot floor. And the water level rose and he says he say water coming out of it. So we know theyre not water proof.

That being said, Barrett and 2 other men were in BR 5 for about an hour after the collision. At some point a group of firemen come in to help rake the boilers for about 15-20 min.... and in Barrets testimony he never mentions any one noticing a leaky door in the room. He says he saw the water initially filling up the bunker so he closed the door but thats it...until is suddenly gives way. Do you think thats realistic? The door was not only perfectly water proof, but also had just enough strength to maintain its structural integrity right up until it gave....

How would that kind of door just pop out of its metal framing? The door would slowly be deformed from the rising water pressure inside, the leak would get more noticeable and someone would have noticed it. But Barrett is asked if he thinks the door gave way and he basically says "sure, I guess".
If you saw the intial flooding and shut the door to contain said flooding, then saw water leaking out the damned door you closed to hold back the flooding, itd be a definite YES, the water definitely came from the coal bunker door. But his testimony hes asked repeatedly if he thinks the sudden wave of water came from the failure of the coal bunker door , the very place he said he saw water flooding into and despite it seeming SO obvious, he practically refuses to answer. Have you read his testimony?
I've often wondered about that "wall of water". Could it not have been from above when BR 6 overflowed into BR5? That would seem feasible, but I don't know the timing of the event. At some time or other, all the boiler rooms flooded over the infamous "not watertight above a certain level" bulkheads.
Here's Bruce's drawing of the area above the end of the WT bulkhead height. With BR6 pressing against the deckhead and as the deckhead wasn't watertight, it seems a good place for the overflow to come crashing down into BR5? Just my four pennorth...
 

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Arun Vajpey

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I've often wondered about that "wall of water". Could it not have been from above when BR 6 overflowed into BR5?
I think when Barrett left BR5, the Titanic was still between 5 and 6 degrees down at the bow. Would that have been enough for the water to overtop the bulkhead between BR6 and BR5?
 
Mar 22, 2003
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I think when Barrett left BR5, the Titanic was still between 5 and 6 degrees down at the bow. Would that have been enough for the water to overtop the bulkhead between BR6 and BR5?
We know that water was seen falling down the first class staircase from E deck onto F deck as early as 12:50am by steward Joseph Wheat; a location that was a good 60 feet aft of where watertight bulkhead E, between No. 5 and 6 boiler rooms, was located.
 
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