Beds


Aug 30, 2005
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According to Walter Lord's A Night to Remember, Arthur Peuchen recalled looking at various items around his room (C-104) during the sinking, one being the real brass bed in his room.

I've seen a picture of stateroom C-117 which is also and inner room with no porthole, yet there is a wooden bed.

I'm a bit confused why would nearly identical rooms have two different beds? Which rooms had brass beds and which didn't?
 
J

Jack Dawson

Guest
Hello everyone, happy to be here

Now, if I may be so bold as to jump right into this old discussion, do the blueprints exist for any of these beds?

Any help is much appreciated.
 

Ajmal Dar

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Jan 5, 2018
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Hi all, Can anyone help?

Why does cabin C64 have two beds labelled 1 and 3? Shouldnt they be labelled 1 and 2?
I have noticed this type of numbering in a lot of the cabins and i dont understand why.

Another example is cabin C93, again the rectangular beds are labelled 1 and 3 and not 1 and 2.

Why is this?

Best regards,

Ajmal
 

Jay Roches

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Apr 14, 2012
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I believe the larger berths (some of which were freestanding beds) for two people are numbered "1" and the others are labeled "3" because the first sleeps two. That is, there's one big bed for two and a smaller bed for one, but "2" is not included. That's because "1 2" means a folding berth above a sofa, a bunk berth, or something like that. There are some cases where a narrower bed is marked "1" and the other "3", but perhaps the first bed is also for two people. If you look for some photos of C-deck cabins you can see what the arrangement looked like.

I'd have a better answer if I could find "Titanic: The Ship Magnificent"...so someone else can probably answer your question better. There's at least a little more to it than just the larger beds for two.
 
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Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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I think this is because the even numbers (eg 2 or 4) were always used for upper berths, which in the case of 1st class would be a folding Pullman type. Thus the cabins with 2 berths/beds, both at deck level and with no Pullmans above them, would have their berths numbered 1 and 3. All such 1st Class cabins on C deck, irrespective of whether one of the two beds is the wider type or not, follow this system and are listed as 2-berth cabins.
 

Jay Roches

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Apr 14, 2012
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That makes sense -- it accounts for staterooms with two narrow beds much better than the idea that wide beds count for two. Thanks!

Some beds on the deck plans have borders around the edges. This appears to mean a canopy bed, as in B-64:
b64%5B1%5D.jpg
 
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Max

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Jan 1, 2018
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I don't know if you guys noticed but there weren't many double beds in the Titanic. I checked the plans and only the first class had bery wide beds which, I guess were used for couples. But I also noticed under the letter and number idetificating the cabin there is always a number. If this number shows the quantity of beds the room has than I'm okay with it cause in this rooms with wide bed there are only two beds. But if this numer indicates the number of passengers the room can host then that means this rooms have got wide beds that are supposed to have one person spleeping
 

Jay Roches

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Apr 14, 2012
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The numbers directly below the cabin numbers are the number of people who can occupy that cabin. The numbers on the beds are the berth number -- upper berths always have even numbers and lower berths or beds always have odd numbers. So if there are two flat beds, no bunks or upper berths, the beds are numbered 1 and 3, and the cabin would accommodate two people.
 
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Max

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Jan 1, 2018
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Hey, looking at the plans I realised that many cabins in first class like B 72, having a passenger capacity of two people, had two beds, one looking like a single bed and the other being much wider. My question is: Were these wide beds for two people (a couple) or marriages just slept in different beds during the voyage?
Also, if married couples did sleep together and say they had a child, then they occupied a cabin with room for only 2 people (as said under the cabin number) but being three (the parents sleeping in the nº1 bed and the child in the nº3
41989-6cc0b6785055ee1d0387ca068780b09b.png

PS: I tried to make myself as clear as possible, I'm sorry if I couldn't acomplish that but I'm not a native speaker.
 

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Mike Spooner

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Jan 31, 2018
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Shannon, there was no fixed number. Titanic was approved to carry up to 3,547 passengers and crew. However, some of the accommodation at the aft end of G deck was removable and could be varied. Also, some of the beds were doubles, so there's no straight answer.

The approved maximum number was split into

905 First Class.
564 Second Class.
1134 Third Class
944 Crew.

In practice, it was unlikely that such numbers would ever be carried.
Hi Dave,
Interesting were those figures came from as books can vary.
Looking at Daniel Klistorner a historian on Olympic/Titanic. Co -Author to Titanic The Ship Magnificent book and consulting to Honor and Glory team.
It show the original design figure:
600 first class
716 second class
1,788 third class
Passengers 3,104.
Crew 875.
Total crew and passengers 3,979.
However these figures would change when the Olympic was put into service with further changes when the Titanic brought into service, were the third class are replaced by more first class and less second class passengers.
787 first class
676 second class
1,008 third class
2,471 passengers
944 crew.
Total crew & passengers 3,415.
That's a 20% drop in the original figures. If the Titanic had carried the original design figure of 3,979. The loses on Titanic were 2/3, as loses on 3976 at 2/3 is 2,650. Thank god she was well short of her maximum capacity!