bells to tell time on Titanic


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And I forgot to mention that the fo'csle head bell, being at an extremity of the vessel, also has a function as a fog signal when the vessel is moored (at anchor or buoys)....

Noel
 
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David Haisman

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Not forgetting the clanging of a ''gong''on the stern of a ship when anchored in fog.
This to indicate to other vessels how the ship is lying.

Also the continuous ringing of a bell from the Lookout when flying fish are seen to be walking across the foredeck

I rest my case.
David.
 
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David Haisman

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Not to mention of course all bells ringing together, along with the ship's siren, as the Lookout reports sighting a black light that had escaped his notice!

I definitely rest my case

David
 

ian Hough

Member
David

What about any alarm clocks that either the crew or passengers may have had?
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Houghie
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David Haisman

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Ahhhhhh! The Bells....The Bells !...... Bats in the Belfry!

I'm outa here ! ! !

David
 
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David Haisman

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Back again, a glutton for punishment, ''Quasi Modo'' and all!( if that's the right spelling)along with a little ''snippit'' or two.
I found it extraordinary that in Titanic's day they actually used a bugle to call diners to dinner. A touch of militarism here I thought, for such an elegant occasion.
On many passenger liners there was a conglomeration of chimes churned out on the Tannoy systems for meals. For childrens meals on emirgant ships, a touch of the Walt Disney about it all.
Union Castle had a ''catchy'' little number with their dinner chimes and after one or two, when the suns up over the yard arm, I've been known to whistle a few bars myself! However, dinner chimes are an unwlecome sound when some complexions take on several shades of green when in the Bay of Biscay and pegs on the noses becomes the order of the day below decks.
When in port, at 8am, the Union Castle Line ships, blasted out ''Hearts of Oak'' on the tannoy system, giving one the feeling of serving under the White Ensign.
After a night in Cape Town, drinking ginger squares, having a ''ding dong'', beating the 7 bells of xxxx out of someone and all looking like ''Hunch'' backs, it may just as well have been the 1812 overture !
This then, the on going story of ''bells''

Sincerely,
David
 
Regarding the fog gong on the after end:

It was not unknown on some 'schooner-rigged' vessels for the saloon dinner gong to be urgently re-deployed for this purpose.

I feel Mike Disch now has enough campanology to be going on with.

"As a matter of interest the Articles also stated that no seaman should carry a sword stick, bowie knife or offensive weapon of any kind."

As I recall, the full list was "firearm, loaded cane, slung shot, swordstick, bowie knife ....".

I understand the so-proscribed bowie knife was a particular double-edged configuration of weapon that had a designed throwing capability. This distinguished it from the ordinary sailor's work knife which was classed as a tool of the trade.


Noel
 
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David Haisman

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''Gongs'' could comprise of anything. I've used a frying pan when on the coast.
Mike Disch, and I should imagine, others out there, may have had enough, but may have learned something as well. This being partly what ET is all about I should imagine.
Regarding the Articles, I always find generalisations are enough when quoting same as I've lived and argued with them on and off, for over 30 years.
Quite right about the knife, not forgetting the marlin spike to keep it company and a bit of sail twine.

David
 
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