Berg Talk


Status
Not open for further replies.

Susan Alby

Member
Oct 22, 2004
188
2
183
If the Iceberg that hit the RMS Titanic could talk, what would it have said to the ship while it was approaching?

"YOU THINK YOUR BIG?"
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,666
881
563
Easley South Carolina
>>If the Iceberg that hit the RMS Titanic could talk, what would it have said to the ship while it was approaching?<<

Something along the lines of "Bloody Hell!" as the ship approached and hit the berg?
wink.gif
(With thanks to Senan Molony for that one.)
 

Damon Hill

Member
Jun 13, 2004
142
6
183
I like that card in newsagencies of a family of Polar bears swimming along with the Titanic sinking in the background, with a caption reading "First holiday in years and a boat hits our bloody iceberg!"
 

Susan Alby

Member
Oct 22, 2004
188
2
183
Thank you, Gentlemen.

Does anyone know how BIG the 'Bloody Berg' was in comparison with the ship?

All my best
 

Jeremy Lee

Member
Jun 12, 2003
1,374
11
233
The exact size of the iceberg will probably never be known, but according to early newspaper reports the height and length of the iceberg was approximated at 50 to 100 feet high and 200 to 400 feet long.
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Mar 16, 2000
5,055
339
433
The berg may have been quite small, as bergs go. About all that is known is that it was higher than the stemhead and lower than the crow's nest. About 70 feet high seems about right. Its length is quite unknown. It seems to have had a pointed top, rather than being a flat object.

I once did a 'back of an envelope' calculation that put its weight as low as 100,000 tons. Roy Mengot, using more elaborate methods, put it as low as 75,000 tons. Either way, it was quite big enough to do the deed.

Forget newspaper reports. They wildly exaggerated the size of the berg and the damage it did. Bergs in that region are quite small, as bergs go. They've come a long way from their parent glaciers and have been at sea for at least a year.
 

Susan Alby

Member
Oct 22, 2004
188
2
183
A photograph was taken of the actual iceberg by a passing (German) ship the day following the disaster. It closely matched the description of the survivors who saw it.

Cheers
 
Jan 21, 2003
271
4
183
Speaking of bergs anyone here about that MASSIVE berg blocking the passage for penguins in i believe the north pole.
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Mar 16, 2000
5,055
339
433
Chris, they must be long distance travelling penguins, a new breed, made by GM. The incident is in the Antarctic, where penguins live, though some live further north, like the ones in my local waters, where it's about 40°C today. Antarctic bergs can be the size of a small nation and one such has got in the way of penguins making for their feeding grounds.

On photographs of the berg that dunnit, I have about eight different photos. There's a thread about photos on this site. Personally, I don't believe any of them show the real culprit.
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Feb 9, 1999
5,343
69
398
The plight of the Adelie penguins is terribly sad - and does, as Dave post suggests, give an idea of just how big a berg can be:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/4094815.stm

The iceberg afflicting the Adelies of Cape Royds in Antarctica, known as B-15A, is some 3,000 sq-km (1,200 sq-mile) in size...and, according to the BBC article above, was the largest floating object in the world when the story was written.

Apsley Cherry-Garrard, who so loved these little birds and devoted much time to them in The Worst Journey in the World, would be heartbroken. He spent a good deal of time after his Antarctic sojourn campaigning to save them from indiscriminate slaughter.
 
B

BOB WILSON

Guest
Why have i never heard of other ships being struck and sunk by Icebergs.

LEEDS. UK.
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,666
881
563
Easley South Carolina
>>Why have i never heard of other ships being struck and sunk by Icebergs.<<

Probably because so few of them have had the press the Titanic has. The fact is that icebergs have been killing ships for centuries. Titanic is hardly unique, just the most notorious.
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,666
881
563
Easley South Carolina
>>Or the death toll?<<

Not quite sure what you're driving at here. The Titanic's death toll was very high in sheer numbers, but this merely reflects the fact that this was a very large ship capable of carrying a lot of people. Be that as it may, the casualty figures didn't hit 100% of all aboard. The same can't be said of literally thousands of vessels of every type, large and small, which set out on a journey across the ocean and were never heard from again.

You can be certain that some of these "mysterious disappearances" were helped into Davy Jones Locker by ice.
 

Jeremy Lee

Member
Jun 12, 2003
1,374
11
233
Yeah, I agree but then again not many ships the size of the Titanic would encounter ice and sink, the Titanic was just at the wrong place at the wrong time. 10% of Titanic's death toll may well be over 100% of other smaller vessels who run into ice. Add the 'unsinkable is sinkable' label and you have a notorious shipwreck!
 
B

BOB WILSON

Guest
Its my view that the iceberg was in some respects simply another ship [admittedly made out of ice]that had full right of way for obvious reasons. At a guess it was visible for some 20 miles and the look out had at least 45 minutes to spot it. This suggests he had wrapped himself up nice and warm and was sound asleep. Because it was a very cold Evening, no passengers were on deck and therefore unable to see it coming and give warning. If the Titanic had had a fender bar fitted along it's sides that protruded say 18 inches from the hull [inc a 10 inch compression gap] this bar would have buckled but saved the ship.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads