Bill DeSena


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Dec 12, 1999
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Now we know why Phillips and Bride could transmit to Port Said! The power of noodles! (Sorry Maureen, I know "macaroni" was a typo, and I mean nothing by the comment. I'm in a strange phase, since I'm moulting right now).

And Bill, next time someone holds another's head underwater, just give the girls a brief description of the functions of a corset. That should engender discipline.
 
Sep 12, 2000
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Actually, I do make a lot of typo's, but I actually typed that one correctly...for me...with colonel versus colonial mustard going around I figured a little marconi wouldn't stretch as far as the macaroni would.

As for me, no facial hair, no purple scales, and absolutely no molting. Fairly boring life with no corset tying fathers in my life.
 

Inger Sheil

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Feb 9, 1999
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Bon, you're a darling, but stop trying to redeem my irredeemable reputation :)

The beauteous Bonnie is too kind, and one of the brighter lights in the Titanic Harbour in more than one sense.

Ing
 
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Bill DeSena

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I'll try this once more, the last one got bogged down in messages that had nothing to do with me and I am extremely vain.

I have been interested in Titanic and nautical history since I was a child and read many books about ships and wrecks. My favorite has always been Titanic its stories just don't fade away after you put the book away or the video cassette back in its slipcase. Why? The awful nagging questions that the tragedy raises are just as germane today as they were then and that's the 'why.' Being an experienced world traveller I have been in some tight spots before myself so I always ask myself what I would have done had I been on Titanic that night and that's when the voyage back to her really starts for me. I am glad this group has the 'bug' too and applaud those of you who have the time, talent and skills to contribute new information to the body of knowledge already in the archives. I hope all of you continue to share your ideas and research here with the dilettantes who try to also add value to the discursions.

Thanks
Bill
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>I am extremely vain<<

Hmmmmmmm...Bill, I don't suppose we could persuade Carly Simon to put this one to music, could we?

Seriously, you may as well re-iterate your extensive body of experience and varied careers. Some of the knowladge and experience you've picked up has cut through some foggy questions here on more then one occassion.

Hope to see you back on the Archaeology board sometime soon, shipmate.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Bill DeSena

Guest
Thanks Michael and a belated Happy Holidays to you and all here!

Yes, I loved that song and thought it was about me too, LOL.

My resume reads like an adventure novel but its all true so here goes the highlights.

I am 48 now and served in the USN 1968-72 on USS Ranger as a Shipserviceman, worked in the tailor shop, cobbler and dry cleaning plants. Went directly into the San Francisco Fashion community as a designer of men's wear from 1972-76 and did costume work for local theatre.

My interests shifted to law enforcement and in 1976 joined the SFPD as a patrolman. I worked the infamous 'Tenderloin' and earned the sobrequet 'The Angel of Death,' from my fellow officers after having single-handedly discovered 7 corpses one each night for a solid week. I left the PD in 1982 and worked for the next 4 years in business as a Realtor and Insurance Broker in Marin County then an offer from the Department of the Navy to work in Intelligence got me back into public service.

It was just after the Walker spy case made sensational headlines and the Navy had egg on its face for its sloppy security that they decided they needed the help of professional police investigators to do their document security. Like most government jobs I worked this one lasted for a month or so before the role was totally changed to a research position at the Pentagon. Rather than shreding documents and burning them I was now involved with weapons technology research in Washington. One day a college associate from Nigeria was being led on a tour and happened to see me in the hallway this lead to his offering me a job consulting for the Nigeria Police. I quit the DOD and started my own consulting firm and departed for Lagos in 1989.

I was supposed to develope riot training for the police and hired military specialists from the British Special Air Services, and former French Foreign Legionares. I was given a police rank of inspector, a uniform, car and driver and a small estate with servants for the next 2 years of my employment.

I returned from Nigeria in 1991 and took the next 3 years off to become an Old Roman Catholic Priest using some of my money to develope a mission to help black children get a better education. The death of my bishop and issues with the new regime made me choose retirement and so I went back to college to study history graduating cum laude in 1996 I was planning to get a grad degree and teach history, but.... I met my wife in college and together we started a techical consultant firm and employment agency that we work now together.

I told you its been an interesting ride and its still not finished yet!

Regards
Bill
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Sounds like you've been all over the place and then some. When I was on the Ranger, the cobbler shop was long gone, but the dry cleaning plant/tailor shop was going strong. I've run both geedunks on the ship, been part of the breakout crew and had custody of the vending machines (14 of the buggers) for nearly a year. As much as I got around, I knew the ship better then anyone in my department.

By the way, did any of those corpus kaputskies die of natural causes?

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Bill DeSena

Guest
No Michael they didn't.

1) Monday: Tossed from a window nearly hit me over an unpaid gambling debt.
2) Tuesday: Shooting over a drug deal.
3) Wednesday: Homicide in hotel room with barbel stuck in head, two gays having a dispute and the weights used as a weapon.
4) Thursday: Alleyway, homeless man died of hypothermia (they always look so peaceful).
5) Friday: Elderly woman jumped from hotel window impacted on red car hood.
6) Saturday: (overtime weekend) Hooker throat cut by pimp in backseat of his car, he didn't drive away from the redzone fast enough before I walked by to write a ticket.
7) Sunday: Stabbing in a restaurant over a money dispute with his ladyfriend. The patrons kept eating and when the coroner carried the corpse away the owner wanted to know who was paying his check.

I guess the hypothermia one is the closest to being 'natural' causes. My nickname was the result of the watch commander asking me after the third corpse was found within an hour of my going on patrol if I was killing them! He said: "You must be the f*&%^ing angel of death." The name stuck unfortunately.

Regards
Bill
 
Dec 12, 1999
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Bill -

That's quite an interesting story. It goes to show that there are still some people out there with incredible life experiences, even in this digital age. Congratulations!
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Hmmmmmm...they got stabbed, shot, slashed and tossed from windows. In the ratholes where you were patrolling, the local thugs probably thought that WAS natural causes.

Wouldn't some of those be regarded as "Public service" killings by some of the detectives? At least that's the euphemism they're supposed to be using in New York City. I've never heard of anyone crying when a pimp assumes room temperature.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Bill DeSena

Guest
Dear Michael,

While I do recall a certain degree of callousness or bravado being displayed the officers of the SFPD never expressed the view that they were "public service killings." Every death is a human tragedy no matter whose and under what circumstances they happen, further, they are more tragic when their poor life choices result in not only their degradation but their ignominous demise. While a clergyman I officiated at more than a few funerals and thus had the unique oppurtunity in life to be on both ends of death it gave me a perspective on it that I dare say few people have.

I've buried infants died from aids and crack from their mothers and young men whose lives ended too soon, along with white haired grand parents with a full quiver of mourning children, grand and even great grand children. Its a human thing that we all seem to share regradless of the circumstances of our lives to mourn our dead regardless how they lived and died.

Regards
Bill
 
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Susan Markowitz

Guest
Hi, Bill -- and welcome to ET! You really have led an amazing life... It's great, too, that after all those "lives", you went back, got a history degree, and launched yet another new career.

You have my utmost respect for the efforts you've made on behalf of those less fortunate. It takes so much strength-of-will to face death on a daily basis, whether as a police officer, a clergyman, or a doctor, and not burn out or give up hope.

Hope ET provides en enjoyable change-of-pace from your workaday life!

All the best -- Susan :)
 
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Bill DeSena

Guest
Thanks Susan for those kind words! Yes, the board does provide many fun moments in a busy fast-paced high tech world. When I review my life thus far it gives me pause to consider how differently it would have been had I stuck with one career for 30 years. I'm glad I didn't!

Regards
Bill
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Hi Bill, and that's the real problem with being in the clergy, or on the police force or other services such as fire/ambulance/paramedic, you see everything up close and personal. You see people at their very best and also at their very worst, and it's the latter which causes so much burnout among those that have to deal with the carnage on a day to day basis. Small wonder that one sees some of what can be described as "Gallows humor" among such people. It's mental self defence.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Bill DeSena

Guest
Hi Michael,

I guess you have a point there,... I always used to go eat after viewing a horrid crime scene and smoke a cigar it seemed to make things better to deal with.

Regards
Bill
 

George Behe

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Dec 11, 1999
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Hi, Bill!

To answer a question you posed to me some time ago, things on the 'Flashy Front' are going exceptionally well; Santa brought me a copy of "Flashman and the Tiger," so now I can look forward to some good reading in the days ahead. :)

All my best,

George
 
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