Boat 8 Passenger


Mike Poirier

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Dec 31, 2004
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According to A Night to Remember, a girl was about to enter boat 8 and exclaimed, " I have forgotten Jack's picture " and ran below to get it. And she made it back in time to board the boat. Who was this girl?
 

Remco Hillen

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Jan 6, 2001
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Boat 8 was under the command of Able bodied Thomas Jones, and lowered on the port side as the 5th boat, at 01:10
it contained 28 persons.
First class passengers in that boat:
Ellen bird(maid to Mrs. Isidor Strauss)Cherry, Gladys
Miss Roberta Maioni
The Countess of Rothes
Mrs Tillie taussig
Miss Ruth Taussig.

Remco:)
 

Remco Hillen

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Jan 6, 2001
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....I'm not into that....I just told you what I knew about boat 8.
Maybe Cherry or Gladys.
Really don't know

Remco:)
 

daniel

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Feb 23, 2011
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Although I don't know who it could have been for sure, I think it might have been Miss Meioni. She did have a romance on board with a crewman, and since she had to evacuate the ship, perhaps she ran down to take his picture.

It's just a thought, might not be true.

Daniel
 

Mike Poirier

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Dec 31, 2004
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Hi Daniel,
Good hypothesis. As the Countess and company were on B deck it would not have taken Roberta too long to run down and get it. Someone like Ruth Taussig would have gone down to E deck and by then the boat would have been gone.
 
K

Katia

Guest
Hi Michael!
I DO NOT know who the girl was but I support Daniel idea.

Anyway, the most probably girls who'd be her or Miss Ruth Taussing (because were the only one that were "girls" and not "women" do you understand??

Hope you find out (if you do please tell us!!!)
:eek:)Kátia
 
Dec 4, 1998
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I, too, support Daniel's hypothesis, and you can eliminate several of the ladies. You can eliminate the married ladies (IE Countess of Rothes, Mrs Taussig, etc) and the older ladies of the lifeboat (Lily Bonnell). It comes down to the young maids of the lifeboat, and to Miss Cherry and Miss Taussig. (I do not think that it could be Ellen Bird, however, as when you think about it, the lifeboat was about to be lowered when Mrs Straus refused her spot and gave her fur coat to her maid to watch over and keep warm. I am certain Mrs Straus would not allow Ellen to rush below decks.) Somebody should just go and try to ask Mr Walter Lord, who wrote that specific piece of information, for he would have a much better clue than the lot of us.
 
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John Morris

Guest
Personally I think that Ruth Taussig is the only possible person to have gone back to her cabin. 1) It certainly would not have been the married ladies, as mentioned above, 2) It also would not have been any of the maids, no maid would ever be allowed by her employer in 1912 to go back and get a picture of whomever, it just plain out would not be allowed, this leaves out Ruth Taussig. I also read above that somebody said that it could not have been her because her cabin was on E-Deck and it would take too long for her to get back in time for launching however do remember this, one she probably was not wearing a corset which would have restricted her ability to move quickly, two she was 18 and therefore although in a dress could have run much faster than any other woman, and three it could be possible that she never got all the way down to her cabin, remember this boat was launched at approxamately 1:10AM and water was already flooding the E-Deck landing area of the grand staircase, Miss Taussig might have seen the water, panicked, and run back up to the lifeboat before she even reached D- or C-Deck.

Just my thoughts,
John Morris
 
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Mike Shetina

Guest
I have found over 30 innacuracies in ANTR and am not sore with the author, but Walter Lord has taken much dramatic liscence in my mind.
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
The Countess of Rothes was put in charge of life boat #8 by Jone.,Jones stated that she had alot to say,She was in charge of the tiller.She was in charge of stering the boat.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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If the spirit of seaman Jones is looking down upon us he'll be amused by that suggestion. He was clearly uncomfortable in a position of authority and no expert at exercising it, but nevertheless he was in charge of the boat. Normally the boat commander would take the tiller, but there was a shortage of experienced rowers so he decided he should take an oar himself. The Countess had doubtless convinced him that she knew how to take instructions for steering a boat, so he gave her that job to free his hands for rowing, not because he thought she'd do a better job.
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
>>If the spirit of seaman Jones is looking down upon us he'll be amused by that suggestion<<

You mean ,he would be happy?
If he's spirit is looking down upon us,i would be horrified. I'm scared of ghosts lol.





>>The Countess had doubtless convinced him that she knew how to take instructions for steering a boat, so he gave her that job to free his hands for rowing, not because he thought she'd do a better job.<<


Don't worry. I know that men ruled over women and men ruled everything back in those days.
wink.gif
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Men should be in charge? Well, that goes without saying!
grin.gif


But I'd have made the same comments had you suggested that Jones put a male passenger in charge. He was placed in command of the boat not because he was a man, but because he was a seaman. It's experience that counts. And apart from Jones the Countess was possibly the only person aboard with experience of steering a boat.
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
>>But I'd have made the same comments had you suggested that Jones put a male passenger in charge<<

Oh, Ok then.


I agree with experience counts.Countess was experience enough. She must have been an out door girl!


>>Men should be in charge? Well, that goes without saying!<<

What does that mean? You agree?
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>Don't worry. I know that men ruled over women and men ruled everything back in those days.<<

I'm sure Margaret Brown would find that amusing. She was quite the "take charge" sort of personality when she saw the need and she had the force of personality to get away with it in a day when few women could.

In any event, this really had nothing to do with the situation at hand. As Bob pointed out, Able Seaman Jones was put, and remained in charge because he was a seaman. The problem here was that the need for seamen outstripped the availability of seamen so they had to make do with scratch crews of passengers, firemen, and even some hotel staff who either volunteered or were essentially drafted.
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
>>I'm sure Margaret Brown would find that amusing. She was quite the "take charge" sort of personality when she saw the need and she had the force of personality to get away with it in a day when few women could. <<

Yes. M/Brown was one tough cookie.

In any event, this really had nothing to do with the situation at hand. As Bob pointed out, Able >>Seaman Jones was put, and remained in charge because he was a seaman. The problem here was that the need for seamen outstripped the availability of seamen so they had to make do with scratch crews of passengers, firemen, and even some hotel staff who either volunteered or were essentially drafted.<<

Michael sir.

I was not actually arguing with bob, i was actually agreeing with him.
All i stated was the countess was put in charge of rowing the boat from seaman Jones
wink.gif
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
What i mean by Her being in charge of Life boat -A book i read states -*Jones put the countess of ruthes in charge of the tiller* Jones qouted *and it seem she had alot to say so i put her in charge of sterring the boat. I did not mean she was in charge of Jones and the whole life boat.

>>but Seaman Jones retained command<<

I did say- I know that Men rule over Women and Men rule everything back in those days!
 
Dec 5, 2008
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>>"I did say- I know that Men rule over Women and Men rule everything back in those days!"<<

Queen Victoria might disagree...
 

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