Boat Deck Cabins

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Jeremy Lee

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Jun 12, 2003
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Wouldn't it look a bit strange in the cabin when sunlight poured though them? But it wouldn't be too bad, I bet they used matching colours.
 
Jun 4, 2003
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Hi! A general question: I have seen in many photos that almost all beds -mainly first class- have a kind of a small hammer hanging near them or something to that effect. Can anybody explain this to me? Your input is much appreciated! Thanks!
 

Nigel Bryant

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Aug 1, 2010
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Hi George,

That was a bracket for hanging one of the portable lamps, seen on the table in the photograph of Titanic's B-57 in "Titanic & Her Sisters". The lamp could be moved if need be to provide additional lightening for the occupant, for reading etc.

Cheers,

Nigel
 
Dec 7, 2000
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George,

Here's a picture: on the left is one of those brackets by itself, and on the right, is a lamp hanging on one of those brackets. You can sort of see the bracket behind it as well.

85067.jpg


Daniel.
 

Jeremy Lee

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Jun 12, 2003
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Was the lamp already supplied in the cabin, and you fixed it yourself where you wanted it to be, or you had to go and collect it (like its optional).

Thanks!
 

Jeremy Lee

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Jun 12, 2003
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>>The lamp could be moved if need be to provide additional lightening for the occupant, for reading etc<<

I mean, were there many brackets supplied in the cabin so that the occupant could move it around as they pleased so where were the other brackets?

Also, a screwdriver would have been used right? so one must be supplied.

Anyway thanks Dan!
 

Dan Cherry

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Mar 3, 2000
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Jeremy,
my impression is that the brackets were only where they could have specific, concentrated use and there was no flat surface to place the lamp upon. That one place would be the bed. The lamp's underside would have had screw slots that one would merely slide over the bracket and lock into place. It's similar to locking a smoke detector to the ceiling or upper wall of a house. The screws are there in place, and all one needs to do is slide the detector into place over the screws for a stable fit.

> Also, a screwdriver would have been used right? so one must be supplied.

Um, no. The WSL wouldn't have had a do-it-yourself bracket and screw pack, obviously - there was no need to have passengers hang a bracket where they saw fit. The WSL already took care of that. The lamp fit on the table, desk/dressing table or easily slid onto the bracket over the bed...The overhead light would have taken care of the rest of the passengers' lighting needs.
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Jeremy and Dan,

There were only so many of those "T" brackets fitted in a cabin, and as Dan said these were usually fitted above each bed. In fact, in the 1st class cabins (only, there were none in 2nd or 3rd class) there was one fitted above each berth. Even where the pullman berth was concerned. Whether it is folded up and not used, or lowered for use, there was a fixed permanent bracket to hang a lamp on, higher up on the wall for that berth.

You may notice that the very top of the bracket had a knob. The portable lamps had a protrusion with a hole in it, so that you could hang the lamp, while the other/bottom, wider end of the "T" supported the lamp.

In the photo below you can actually see the knob on the bracket, and that protrusion with the hole on the lamp. Of course the bottom of the bracket is straight (rather than curved as in the photo above) because as you can see the base of the lamp is straight:

85084.jpg


Technically the lamp could swing on its bracket (it was not slotted and fixed into position as Dan described). The following mainly applies to the larger cabins (i.e. suites) but sometimes there were additional brackets elsewhere on the paneling and not only just above the bed. This was found in the larger cabins where additional permanent wall lights were not included (you would have seen from photos that some styles had these), so a bracket was generally fitted above the sofa. However in the simple cabins, there was generally only one bracket per berth.

In the picture below, you can see the knob and the lamp hanging on it.

85085.jpg


Regards,

Daniel.
 
Jul 11, 2001
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WOW! That is so cool! I have often wondered what that attachment was for. Thanks for those pics. Amazing after all these years we can still learn something new about the Ship.
 
Jun 12, 2004
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>>The outer was clear glass, then was a solid board which could be closed to block out sun light, and innermost was a stained glass panel. Or was is the stained glass panel was in the middle? Either way, the two inner ones could be slid (down) out of sight while the outer - clear glass - panel slid up.<<

Daniel, the shudder, as always, was most likely on the inside, with the stained glass in the center. How could a shudder be closed if it had been in the middle? The stained glass panel, if on the inside, would have to be lifted first. That's too inconvenient. It would obviously make better sense to fit the shudder on the insider where it could just simply be lowered or raised and/or adjusted if necessary.

By the way, where did you find this information? Would it be noted on the blueprints? Most likely, I suppose, as the blueprints naturally provided a detailed guide for construction, so such information would, of course, have to be. I just wondered.

Take care
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Mark,

I cannot remember the reason for my confusion, maybe some source mentioned the 3 panes in no particular order and I got confused as to which went where. Or ... perhaps the stained glass was on the outside, that even though the shutter was closed, the inner most pane in the cabin was still aesthetically pleasing.

As for the sources, I think one of them was the H&W Olympic specification book 1911 - 1913, and the other was a 1911 Peskett report. The latter one mentions these in more detail.

Daniel.