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george bowes

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I speculate that this crew member was body#219 picked up by the MacKay-Bennett. He was identified as M.Rame as read from markings on his personal effects. I propose that the name was misread as the name Rame does not appear on any list. Body #219 was wearing a fancy vest and cufflinks which could describe a saloon steward. His age was estimated at 35, Rowe was 31.
 

Bob Godfrey

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The description of the clothing on the body doesn't correspond to any kind of WSL crew uniform, but if not a passenger he could perhaps have been a restaurant waiter or a mail clerk. I wouldn't place much reliance on the name (if indeed that's what it is). I have odd bits of paper in my wallet with contact names written on them, and many people in 1912 bought second-hand clothing and other items marked or engraved with names other than their own. Does anyone know on what item this 'name' appeared, or whether it appeared more than once?
 

george bowes

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Follow up on Body #219: a history of my messages connecting M. Rowe to this body can be found in E.T. by searching under Body #219.

W. Rowe was a saloon steward (first class) and I believe that his clothing (fancy vest with chain) could be the "garb" for a bartender or a waiter. I could not find any information of a formal uniform for these stewards. As fas a the name M. Rame on his underclothing could have been misread as then name "Rame" appears on any list. I stand by my hypothesis that could be "Rowe". However, it cannot be proven as many mistakes could have been in identification. Body #4 , the male child, is an example as he went through "four" different identities.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Look at other body descriptions. Many are described as wearing uniforms, which were familiar to those writing the descriptions. Saloon stewards (there were no bartenders) did have a uniform and this body wasn't wearing it. If he had been then the body would have been listed as "probably a steward" or the like. Fancy vests and striped shirts might be favoured by New York bartenders, but were not part of any WSL uniform.
 

george bowes

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Body #219: I have checked other body descriptions and learned that most stewards were wearing white jackets with a number badge. M.Rowe was wearing two coats but no steward jacket. I do a agree the body could have been that of a restaurant waiter or a mail clerk. However, the name W. Rame on his clothing could have been M. Rowe. I have read there were errors/misreading on names of identification. No one can know the truth...
 

Bob Godfrey

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"M.Rowe was wearing two coats but no steward jacket"

Correction - Body No 219 was wearing two coats and no steward jacket. And no other part of a steward's uniform either.
 

george bowes

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I concede. I did not base my conclusion that body# 219 was M.Rowe (first class saloon steward) on the description of clothing as I learned that the body had no uniform/white jacket, badge, etc.I noted the name W.Rame and could not find that name on any list and that misreading of names on other identifications. I noticed that the name M. Rowe could fit. This was the crux to my hypothesis. We can never know the truth.
 

george bowes

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Looking into identities of bodies, It is interesting to note that some bodies remain still unidentified at this time (43). I mention body #112 (steward's uniform, badge #42), body #125 (steward's uniform, badge#37 and initials G.V.N on drawers) body #212, badge #73, and body #214 badge #41... I shall continue my research into why identification was not made through steward uniform and badge number? Hope for responses.
 

george bowes

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Thank you Bob:
You saved me time. This article (thanks to the author) is just what I needed, especially Body 125. Gunn is another example of misreading names and makes my case for M. Rowe more plausible.However, the possibility of wearing another person's belongings still exists.
 
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First off I support the that it is Rowe. They all dressed differently and I personally feel that they knew that they were going to die so they would dress their best. Just look at steward Sidney Halloway's body account. They thought he was a joiner officer, but as we know he was a clothes presser. Just saying that a lot of the bodies got misidentified or other stuff like that. I hope this helps! - Andrew
 
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