Booze


Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,043
107
333
UK
Ethanol is bad news, Senan. Decline all invitations to the Smoke Room, get on the waggon and ride it down to the 3rd Class Dining Room where you can order a good healthy fry-up. If you must, you can cover it with this:

www heinz co uk/sauce-partners/hp-sauce/hp-guinness
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,043
107
333
UK
Well, it didn't fool me. It's not far off the right colour and the right flavour but it has no head at all. And you need to buy at least three jars to fill a pint glass.
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,043
107
333
UK
Welcome back, Ryan! It's good to have a man of taste and discernment onboard once again. However, it's my view that the best invention since the knife was the fork. Or maybe the spoon. Being from Darwen you might be unfamiliar with these later developments but you really should try them if you come down south. MUCH more effective than the fingers, especially for soup.
 
Aug 15, 2005
908
5
183
35
Darwen, United Kingdom
An implement invented finally for the consumption of soup? What amazing times of technological advancement we live in...
Good t'see thee, Bob! I have missed your good self, you know?

I'll see you around the boards no doubt. - just gonna pop for a cuppa and stick another nail in the coffin for the time being. Chat soon!
 

Keira Bryant

Member
Mar 6, 2021
1
0
1
Hi everyone, I am particularly interested in the dining experience on Titanic,
Most sources claim that there were 850 bottles of liquor and around 1000 bottles of wine on board.
That doesn't seem like a large amount of alcohol for the crossing. I recall that there were about 325 first class passengers who would probably be used to the large variety of wines customary at dinner. In addition to that, there were many second class passengers who would want to access wine because they would have been able to had they been travelling in first class on another ship. My question is was there not the usual Edwardian food and wine pairings in the general dining room? Were people simply not drinking? or was the bottle size larger in 1912?
I would be very grateful for any help
 

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