Boston Mails China


Mar 19, 2008
14
0
31
I have been a collector of "Boston Mails" china for many years. The pattern was registered in 1841. It comes in four colors (lavender, blue, brown and black" and several varieties including Gentlemans Cabin, Ladies Cabin and Saloon. I have seen in some places

cabin.jpg


the assertion that this china was used on board the first four cunard liners but I found this hard to believe. For one reason, the Brittania made its maiden voyage on July 4, 1840 and the pattern wasn't registered until late 1841. In addition there is just too much of it around in a variety of pieces and shapes. Does anyone in the group have any hard information and/or anyone else a collector of this china.
 

1862

Member
Dec 27, 2014
1
0
11
Palm Springs, CA
The china was issued and used on the four ships and also sold mainly in the US.
The late maritime dealer Ted Hindmarsh, who lived near there, told me this
was always an issue until his uncle, the Boston harbormaster, in the 1930's
dredged the docks were the first ships tied up. They found some of the china
in the mud and was assumed the stewards, instead of having to wash a batch
before going ashore, tossed it out the port. Seems a logical connection to the
ships then. I have the largest collection of this china too, and started collecting it
in 1977. Will attach an article I wrote some years ago later when i get it scanned.
 

Attachments

  • cabin.jpg
    cabin.jpg
    67.6 KB · Views: 196

Charles Sachs

Member
Feb 27, 2015
2
0
11
Happy to answer any questions you may have.
On occasion some unusual pieces surface like
a domed small serving plate. Attached is a story
I did for Collector's Showcase Sept/Oct 1984.
The large covered pieces are rarest, usually
without the lid. Ladles are impossible to find.

Boston Mails China Outside Brochure Mar 15 2015  1.02 MEG.jpg


Boston Mails Brochure Inside 527K.jpg
 

Charles Sachs

Member
Feb 27, 2015
2
0
11
The china was not used until all four ships
were in service. It was sold in the US for
the historic interest and maybe why some
more unusual pieces were made, like the
chamber pots (have two, black and one
color with full borders). The cake stand on
the front of the brochure is really special.
Hollow pieces, like the water pitchers,
are very rare. With the tossing ships, can
image the pieces broken on a nasty voyage.
 
Mar 7, 2019
1
0
1
Hi Charles, I have a client with a beautiful collection of blue and white Boston Mails "Ladies Cabin" Staffordshire china which has been in their family since the 1840s. Do you still collect pieces or know anyone who does? I know the pieces are rare: large covered dish, large platter, 2 dinner plates, large square footed serving dish. Thank you in advance, Ann
 

Similar threads

Similar threads