Boxhall Beesley Elvis Presley and The Beatles


Jun 12, 2004
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You know, it just occurred to me that many famous people from Titanic lived to see TV, rock-n-roll, Elvis Presley, and even The Beatles. It would have been interesting to engage in a conversation with Boxhall about the Titanic, but I think it would have been even more interesting to have discussed rock-n-roll and Elvis Presley with him. Oh, what would he have said! HA! I say this considering that the band on board the Titanic was a long shot from rock-n-roll, hehe. I apply the same consideration and correlative questions to Beesley and Frederick Fleet, who died in the late 60s and therefore lived to witness The Beatles during their heyday (peace-n-love, sex, the hippie generation...), although they were considerably old at the time.

By the way, when did the first ships go out with TV and other electronic systems? It would have been interesting also to gain Boxhall's perspective on that, hehe.

Sorry, just thinking aloud and sharing some random thoughts...
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
I think it depends on what electronic systems you're talking about. Radiotelegraph had been in use practically from the turn of the century, and radar was appearing on warships by the close of the 30's but I don't think TV could have been put on board much befor the 50's.
 
Jun 12, 2004
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In any case, Boxhall, and most likely Pitman, were around when such entertainment systems were introduced to ships' accommodations.

Still, I'd be curious what their perspective would have been on that.
 
Jan 16, 2006
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I doubt TV's were onboard even in the 1950's. I was born in 1963 and remember as a young child, my mom telling my dad,(while he was on the roof,messing with the antenna) " A little more to the left, good, good, right there..." Gosh, come to think of it, I HOPE he was on the roof. Anyway, I think you get my point.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Anyway, I think you get my point.<<

I'm not sure I do. Any televisions on shipboard would invariably be closed circuit systems with "broadcasts" being little more then shows that had been prerecorded.

Televisions go back as far as 1928 when the first primitive sets became available. They weren't very practical and the first commercial broadcasts didn't start taking place until around 1935. I don't know when they started appearing on ships, but on a closed circuit system, antennea placement wouldn't really be an issue unless they were trying to pick up shoreside broadcasts.

Just as a little diversion, you might find the following website to be of interest. http://www.tvhistory.tv/index.html
 
May 1, 2004
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From Marilyn Mohr-Wisdom : "I was born in 1963 and remember as a young child, my mom telling my dad,(while he was on the roof,messing with the antenna) " A little more to the left, good, good, right there..." Gosh, come to think of it, I HOPE he was on the roof."

Ahh, the memories you brought back of a summer Saturday afternoon. Dad on the roof, sweating, adjusting the antenna. Brother Don up there with him, steadying it. Mother on the front lawn, alternately wringing her hands and moaning "Don't Fall. Don't Fall." Brother Doug and myself shouting from the front door "We lost the picture! No! It's there! No! We lost it!"
Mmm. Dear old 1960's!
 
Jan 16, 2006
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The point that I was trying to make is that TV's were not on ships at that time, at least not for viewing shows and the like. Sure, they used them for closed circuit but thats a whole different thing.....
Now, back to the already in progress television program.
 

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