Boxhall's Green Flares


Mila

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However, the earliest that rockets were seen from those in the boats was about 45 minutes before the first boat was picked up. (See Boxhall, American inquiry p. 911). Distress rockets (actually socket signals) of the kind used on passenger vessels of the time would go to heights of 600 to 800 feet. If Carpathia started to send them up as early at 2:45am they should have been seen by those in the boats. They were not.
Sam, I hope you agree now that the rockets seen at 3:30 were actually not rockets themselves, but flashes at the base. So in the light of this, I believe we should take another look at 2:40 flares. Rostron was probably closer to the boats at 2:40 than you believe he was. Maybe he was close enough to see the flare. Another possibility is that he might have seen a reflection of the flare ( there were many highly reflective icebergs all around).
 

Mike Spooner

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Major Peuchen said one of the lifeboats had - "a sort of a bluish light......we thought at first was a steamer or something." Was this bluish light coming from Boxhall's flares? Was the atmopshere causing the light to turn blue?

Titanic fired rockets which were reportedly white, but Hichens said - "They were blue."

John Poingdestre said he saw an emergency boat with - "a blue or a green light."

Ernest Gill on the Californian saw the tail end of the rockets and said - "They looked to me to be pale blue, or white. It would be apt to be a very clear blue."

Was something in the atmosphere affecting the colours?


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Or were they colour blind?
 
Mar 22, 2003
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Sam, I hope you agree now that the rockets seen at 3:30 were actually not rockets themselves, but flashes at the base.
No, I do not.
Aaron asked: >>Was something in the atmosphere affecting the colours?<<
What you have are different people trying to described what they saw. I think Lightoller said it best when he said they were: "Principally white, almost white."
How about white with a slight shade of blue, perhaps? The one thing is clear. The Cotton Powder Company didn't supply a multicolor, 4th of July fireworks display to be used for distress signals.
 

Mila

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No, I do not.
Yeah, right, and I guess it is precisely why so very few of the survivors saw the rockets at all, and Mr. Stengel who did , saw “that flashlight, it was like powder was set off“. Of course it is the right way to describe a rocket exploding into the stars.;)
 

Jim Currie

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I'm sure you have all heard of the light spectrum and seen rainbows. Perhaps the ideas of different colours were exacerbated by the amount of steam condensate which must have been lying in a flat 'tablecloth' above the sinking vessel?
 

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