Brand Names of the Era

Apr 11, 2001
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Old Codgers everywhere- may you be sweetly remembered today of all days! Yes, those were the days my friends... I too remember television sets the size of fishbowls, chamber pots, slop jars and outhouses, pumps and Fletcher's Castoria, Bromo Seltzer, Lydia Pinkham and the simple pleasures of growing up on a chicken farm. The big thrill was hearing the Grand Ole Opry, watching the Lone Ranger in black and white, wearing bits of kid leather called "kits" in my hair so there would be ringlets for Sunday School, chicken every Sunday, the women chattering obstetrics while doing dishes after Sunday dinner while the menfolk snoozed on the front porch or watched Casey Stengel and Whitey Ford at Yankee Stadium, there were maybe 5 kinds of chewing gum, and Schwinn was the bicycle to have. My vintage is 1951 and most of the above is Gilded Age stuff-so too true, Bob and Dave- we were "almost there". But today- I am thinking of taffy. Yes- that 1880's seaside confection which was the #1 souvenir from Atlantic City to Brighton Beach and Torquay. The Brits will call it toffee and shipping companies put it up in tins- I have a small collection of Queen Mary tins. QE2 still has the toffee tins in their gift shop. Fralinger's at Atlantic City New Jersey is still in business. The tale goes that there was a storm and a local confectioner's candy shop was flooded with ocean water near the beach- all was a loss except for the taffy which he dried off and wrapped in waxed paper , boxed and the rest is history. It makes a good story. I still have a taffy pull about once a year using Granny's molasses taffy recipe. It is to be made in winter as humidity is death to taffy. Today is a grand taffy day- it is minus 2 here in Connecticut at the moment. Just remember to butter your hands! I bought a tin of Harrogate toffee recently- from that famous Gilded Age spa town- not a bit like American taffy. Ours is softer, usually pastel colors and fruit flavors or chocolate. Alas, with so much dental work, my taffy days are over.
 
Nov 9, 2002
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Hey All,
Im not sure if anyone had put this down here yet but since im just getting over the stomach flu....TERRIBLE! I lost 12 pounds....And people were already saying I needed to gain! Anyways Canada Dry Gingerale has been around since 1904. Hope this helps. PS Thanks for giving credit to the Persians up there Shelly!

Sahand
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Before Valentine's Day is over- we must mention cotton candy which appeared at Ringling Bros. Circus in 1900- Tom Patten getting the patent! Popcorn has been around for ages with Jolly Time being America's first brand name founded by Sioux City Iowa's native son Cloid Smith in 1914. Popcorn machines run on gasoline were on storefronts to attract attention back in 1885. Charlie Cretor's copper poppers can still be found. During WWII, with sugar rationing, popcorn consumption rose 3 times, as there was little candy, and went up 500 times in the 1950's as families plopped down in front of television sets at night. Two German brothers named Ruekheim thought of pouring molasses syrup on popcorn for the Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, and Cracker Jacks were born and immortalized in that favorite baseball park ditty "Take Me Out to the Ballgame- buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jacks" in 1908. And now candy lovers- a photo of our rock candy which looks like those science experiments we did with sugar and string-and off to raid the fridge for sugar!
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Apr 11, 2001
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More Gilded Age brands and icons:
1910 teabags introduced (a groan from the Brits)
1911 Crisco put on the market (groans from chefs)
1912 A prize put in Cracker Jacks
1912 Hamburger buns discovered!
1912 Lifesavers introduced (peppermint in 1913)
1912 Lorna Doone cookies by Nabisco
1912, Ocean Spray cranberry juice, bottled vitamins, Whitman's Chocolates Sampler
1913 The Oreo Cookie
And the soda wars were raging Dr. Pepper and Canada Dry Gingerale in 1904, Pepsi in 1902 and the Dixie cup (white and green)to drink your "pop" in 1908. Food icons like the Campbell Kids appeared in 1904, the little Morton Salt Girl in 1914 (when it rains it pours) and Mr. Peanut in 1916. And thanks Mr. Hershey for the plain chocolate bar in 1900- also the year of cotton candy and Chiclets chewing gum!
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
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I keep coming across 1912 ads for Harley Davidson motor bikes. The featured a whole 4" of travel in the seat springs.