Breakfast and lunch on Titanic

B

Bob Godfrey

Member
She'll be likewise delayed getting out of her 'Sailor's Friend':

Untitled 15


Jake, what style do you recommend?:

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M

monica e. hall

Member
Hhmm. This has got me wondering how Jack and Rose got her out of her corset in Billy Carter's Renault. And then back into it afterwards. Extraordinary the daft things one will think about. I wish I'd never mentioned corsets now ... and one wonders if the Sailor's Friend would have been better than the White Star's life jackets? And did anyone take aboard a Registered Tourists Bath to avoid the queues for the bathrooms, which must have been quite a tricky business from what I can see from Titanic's layout?
 
J

Jake Angus

Guest
Bob, I'd recommend at style that's not shown: handlebar.

Monica, as far as Jack and Rose getting into and out of their respective garments in the Renault, haven't we all had to shed our garments and re-clothe in record time on one or more occasions? Necessity is, after all, the mother of invention! ;`}
 
J

Jake Angus

Guest
...getting back to First Class perquisites... let's say a passenger gets the munchies in the middle of the night. Does the passenger ring the bell for the steward and request a glass of milk and a turkey sandwich? Or were the stewards officially 'off duty' until breakfast the next morning, leaving the poor passenger to toss and turn until the sun rose over the North Atlantic?
 
L

Lee Gilliland

Member
Gee Jake, I thought that was a lot more interesting! Spoilsport! ;-)

To get back to your comment, I would imagine they would have a concierge or night manager - it's a long-standing hotel amenity, and that was what Titanic was, after all.
 
B

Bob Godfrey

Member
The same question cropped up in this thread:


Violet Jessop's memoirs suggest that a steward's working day was infinitely flexible and expanded or contracted to fit the amount of work available, so that periods of heavy demand were interspersed with stretches of boredom and nothing much to do. Those who were on call at night probably didn't didn't have too many bell calls to deal with - at least when the sea was calm!
 
Hitch

Hitch

Member
Could anyone please tell me if you could have breakfast in the Verandah Café?

Thanks.
 
D

Diego Uriol

Guest
I've always heard that passengers had lunch and dinner in the dinning saloon, but what about the breakfast. Where was it taken? In the dinning saloon also?
 
A

alex.titanic

Member
What were the first class passengers given for breakfast? I know that menus of what they had for lunch and dinner have survived but I haven’t heard a lot about what was offered for breakfast. Also, were married ladies expected to come down for breakfast? Because, I know in Edwardian culture they were offered breakfast in their rooms.

Thanks! :)
 
Thomas Krom

Thomas Krom

Member
Hello Alex,

1579521840033

Here is a picture of the breakfast on the 11th of April in the first class dinning saloon.

It states the following:

“Baked Apples, Fresh Fruit, Stewed Prunes, Quaker Oats, Puffed Rice, Fresh Herrings, Findon Haddock, Smoked Salmon, Grilled Mutton Kidneys & Bacon, Grilled Ham, Grilled Sausage, Lamb Collops, Vegetable Stew, Fried, Shirred, Poached or Boiled Eggs, Plain or Tomato Omelettes, Sirloin Steak & Mutton Chops, Mashed Sauteed or Jacket Potatoes, Cold Meat, Vienna & Graham Rolls, Soda & Sultana Scones, Corn Bread, Buckwheat Cakes, Blackcurrant Conserves, Narbonne Honey, Oxford Marmalade, Watercress”



There also was a picture taken in the dinning saloon during breakfast on the 11th by Francis Browne before he left the ship in Queenstown, it is the only picture of the room taken on-board the Titanic. Here it is.

1579521855995


I read some stories that some first class passengers recieved their breakfest’s in their staterooms. A famous example is Thomas Andrews Jr who got his breakfast existing out of fresh fruit and tea every morning on 7 o’clock in his stateroom A-36 (in Harland and Wolff bedroom B style). I am sure of it other passengers who were sea-sick would get their breakfest in their staterooms (If I remember correctly there was once mention of it by a passenger).



I hope it helps.



Yours sincerely,



Thomas
 
Milos Grkovic

Milos Grkovic

Solo 3D modeller and Artist
Member
I agree with @Thomas Krom comment posted above.
 
Mike Stevens

Mike Stevens

Member
The "all you can eat" stand in line with a plate or tray and pick what you wish to eat from a table type buffet was unheard of until Herb McDonald came up with the idea in 1946 at the El Ranch Vegas resort on the strip in Las Vegas. It was a simple spread of cold cuts, snacks, and a few hot meals and was served at midnight, as a way to get hungry people who were leaving the shows at other establishments to come and eat. The cost was just $1. It worked, and besides being popular, was cost effective because it eliminated the overhead of keeping an entire restaurant staff on duty. It also provided gamblers for the graveyard shift, a time when casinos are usually the least busiest.

On ships, especially prior to WW2, the term "buffet" does mean a lavish spread of all you can it. However it means you can request whatever you wish off the menu and the waiters will bring it to you. You can eat as much as you like, until the restaurant runs out of your selection. Prior to WW2, the wealthy considered it beneath them to do the plebeian "work" of having to dish up their own food and bring it to the table. They confided that was the job of servants, and their rightful job was to be "served". The idea of an anytime, walk in, grab a plate and load up as much food as you like, then find a place to sit and eat was unheard of in 1912. Too bad nobody had thought of this, it might have been a big attraction.

Cafeterias did exist, in large cities, but again, catered to the working class who punched a time clock. With every minute of a lunch hour counting, going to a cafeteria, grabbing a tray and then having a staff member dish up your food from a prepared selection, then paying for that and eating it was very popular. New York City in 1900 was cafeteria heaven. But it was not all you can eat. You got one portion, and if you wanted "seconds", then you paid for a second portion.

Royal Caribbean in the 1980s was offering a midnight buffet, which was very popular. Now I understand almost no cruise line offers midnight buffets, or not the giant full spreads of foods that they used to offer. At every seating in the restaurant, you could always ask for more, and the waiters would say "are you sure you want more?", or something to try to discourage you, but if you said yes, then off they would go and come back with another plate of this or that. That is how most of the old liners worked. Of the old liners, one of the earliest "stand in line and fill your plate" buffets that I am aware of was Matson Lines in the mid 1950s with the "Aloha Buffet". They weren't being nice to you, they were just trying to cut cost by reducing staff. The advent of tourist class airfares on United and Pan Am with their DC-6Bs was starting to pull away passengers from ships. Now you could be in Honolulu in just 8 hours by air and on the be on the beach the same day.
 
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