Bridge telegraphs

B

Bob Read

Guest
Parks:
I have heard that Bill thinks the most inboard
port telegraph is the emergency engine telegraph.
I have never seen any reasoning as to why. I have seen some speculation about the inboard starboard telegraph relating to an inability to read the port side of the dial in the Browne photo. My impression is that the inability to read the dial relates to the reflection angle on the glass rather than an absence of actual markings.
With that said, how would one distinguish between the two? The photo evidence appears to be just too thin. In the Browne photo we can see standard engine telegraph markings on the inboard port telegraph. I would expect the starboard inboard
telegraph to appear identical. The only way I could envision this being settled is if in some archive there is found an actual description of the individual telegraphs. Given the black hole that is the H&W archive at present I fear it may be some time before this mystery is resolved.

Regards,
Bob Read
 
P

Parks Stephenson

Member
Bob,

I hold to the speculation about the difference in reflection. I don't believe the photographic evidence is too thin at all. What's more, the reasons for that dial looking different from the others in the photograph make sense to me.

Bill is still in the midst of his research. After talking with him on the subject, I am content to wait until he completes his study of the telegraphs, because I know he has the practical knowledge and the resources to back up his assertions. If, however, you have an alternate explanation for the telegraph positioning with either resources or practical logic to back up your speculation, I will be more than glad to hear it.

After prodding J.W. Ray & Co., I've come to accept that the kind of straight-forward explanation for each individual telegraph probably doesn't exist. However, there is enough material in various places that can be drawn together to reconstruct a plausible description of the telegraph layout. After that, it's up to the individual to believe or disbelieve....or, in your group's case, to model one way or the other.

Parks
 
P

Parks Stephenson

Member
Maureen,

My thanks to you and Tom Bodette. :)

It's good to be back in time for the holiday shopping season to begin in earnest.

Parks
 
N

Norman Olsen

Member
Bob, One question about telegraphs. Which one communicated with the turbine engine room, if any did? If none did, how did the bridge comunicate with the turbine room, other than by phone? Norm Olsen
 
M

Morgan Eric Ford

Guest
There wasn't a separate telegraph for the turbine. The controls for the turbine were located on the starting platform for the recip engines. The turbine operated on the exhaust steam of the recip engines so there wasn't anyway to throttle it separately, the only control they had over it was to either engage or bypass it.
 
Andy A Carter

Andy A Carter

www.andycarter.net
Member
I think I'm right in that the Telegraphs were connected by Ropes, Cables and Pulleys running through the Ship.

The question I have is, I can understand that when you move the Telegraph Lever and your pulling on the Ropes etc it works - how does it work moving the lever the other way when you pushing on a Rope etc?

Thx Andy
 
Roger Southern

Roger Southern

Member
I think I'm right in that the Telegraphs were connected by Ropes, Cables and Pulleys running through the Ship.

The question I have is, I can understand that when you move the Telegraph Lever and your pulling on the Ropes etc it works - how does it work moving the lever the other way when you pushing on a Rope etc?

Thx Andy
I'll have a crack at this. Just remember that it was a loop of chain not just one length. Think of a bicycle chain- it works both ways by pulling in one 'end' or the other, i.e you can pedal or back-pedal and the chain moves both ways. Same basic principal with the telegraph connections at each end. Make sense?
 
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Andy A Carter

Andy A Carter

www.andycarter.net
Member
Hey Roger,

thanks, makes perfect sense, I was a bit slow there.

I like your profile picture, the 4 Litre R, I own one.

Regards

Andy
 
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Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

Staff member
Moderator
Member
There is plenty of good stuff including an excellent diagram regarding the Bridge telegraphs and how they worked, in the book "TITANIC: The Ship Magnificent Volume 1: Design & Construction". If you can find copies of these books (there are two volumes), I highly recommend purchasing them. There are no other books such as these; they are truly a goldmine of information.
 
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Seumas

Seumas

Member
There was a great illustrated article by Bill Sauder hosted on Parks Stephenson's old website (now down) about the various kind of telegraphs but sadly the *Internet Archive snapshots did not preserve most of the photos and CGI images which were essential to understanding the thing.

Here it is if anyone is still curious - Titanic's Engine-order Telegraphs

* If any of you want to save snapshots of websites, I'd recommend using, Archive Today at - archive.ph - it saves all the images whereas the Internet Archive often fails to capture images.
 
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Andy A Carter

Andy A Carter

www.andycarter.net
Member
There is plenty of good stuff including an excellent diagram regarding the Bridge telegraphs and how they worked, in the book "TITANIC: The Ship Magnificent Volume 1: Design & Construction". If you can find copies of these books (there are two volumes), I highly recommend purchasing them. There are no other books such as these; they are truly a goldmine of information.
Thx Jason,

I do have Vol 1, fantastic book but I'm away for a couple of weeks and woke up thinking of this.

Andy
 
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