Britannic Headlines

Apr 22, 2012
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Hello,


Exactly Mike!
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Mark,

I guess you're right about it being good that Britannic is being promoted, even if it is on a terrible made-for-television flick. You're right about the fictional love triangle story being one of the main reasons I didn't like the film; why don't any film makers seem to think history is entertaining?! I think the film would have stood much better had it been focused on Violet Jessop. The story writer could have still had a main character who was a young lady, and had survived the sinking of the Titanic!


Cheers,
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-B.W.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Brandon asked; "why don't any film makers seem to think history is entertaining?!"

Probably because to a lot of people it isn't. If one takes as close a look at the Titanic and Britannic...or any other maritime event...one is immidiately struck by just how mundane the events were that led up to it. People simply went about the business of their daily lives.

No big deal, and no fanfare.

Then everything goes to Hell!

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Apr 22, 2012
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Hello Mike,

Yeah you're probably right. I like the way A Night to Remember does it; they skip all the "boring" stuff and lead us up to the night it all goes down. It still shows only the history of the event.


Cheers,
happy.gif


-B.W.
 
Sep 5, 2001
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Britannic did make the NY Times in the few days following her sinking. Unfortunately, the articles are unimpressive. Very little factual information can be found and they are laced with propaganda.

The Times might be a better choice, simply because it is a British publication. I've not seen The Times' coverage (the index at our library is in a very out-of-the-way location). The Times is a very odd newspaper; the headlines are not on the front page. I'll check our index tommorrow or Friday.

Nathan R.
 
Sep 5, 2001
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Coeverage by The Times was really not that extensive. Articles on Britannic appeared on Nov. 23, 25, 27, 29 and Dec. 4.

Although coverage in The Times is not much different from what appeared in the NY paper, the British publication includes a map of the area where Britannic was sunk.

According to The Times, Britannic was mined or torpedoed 1.5 miles (I had no idea it was this close. Is The Times report correct?) off the island of "Zea". This is also near the SE point of Attica. The map indicates that Britannic was sunk on the western side of the island in a "channel" of some sort.

The British government also made quick restitution to Oceanic Steam Navigation Company. Britannic was valued at 2,000,000 pounds according to the paper. I presume that this amount was forwarded to the liner's owners.

"Keiler Zeitung", a German newspaper, indicates that Britannic was struck by a torpedo because she was being used as a "transport" vessel. Pointing out the high number of people on board Britannic, the Germans offered this as proof that the vessel was being used to transport (soldiers?).

Due to conflicting evidence, a hearing convened shortly after the sinking was unable to determine if the ship was sunk by mine or torpedo. Of course, the English paper proclaimed the sinking to be a savage act by the barbaric Germans.

Nathan Robison
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Hi Nathan!

This can only be a quick reply I am afraid -- 'Zea' is a common spelling in numerous sources, even including Lloyd's. In fact, it's probably more common than 'Kea.'

<FONT COLOR="119911">Britannic was mined or torpedoed 1.5 miles (I had no idea it was this close. Is The Times report correct?)

This estimate fits some survivors' recollections. If you look in the 'Report of a formal investigation' Britannic thread then there should be some info. I posted from Lloyd's and the Admiralty, if I recall correctly.

<FONT COLOR="119911">The British government also made quick restitution to Oceanic Steam Navigation Company. Britannic was valued at 2,000,000 pounds according to the paper. I presume that this amount was forwarded to the liner's owners.

No, but a good amount some 250,000 less was forwarded early in 1917; there was some lengthy correspondence about it between Sanderson and Officials. Britannic's exact value was under 2,000,000, but this fits as a round figure. Estimates vary (also detailed in the other Britannic thread).

Best regards,

Mark.
 
P

Phillip Ivey II

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HOSPITAL SHIP BRITANNIC SUNK; 50 LIVES LOST; Giant White Star Liner Torpedoed Off Island of Kea, in Aegean Sea.
Special Cable to THE NEW YORK TIMES.. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Nov 23, 1916. pg. 1, 1 pgs


LONDON, Thursday, Nov. 23. -- The hospital ship Britannic has been sunk by a German submarine in the Aegean Sea. The story of the submarine attack is told by The Daily Chronicle's Athens correspondent in the following dispatch dated Tuesday:



This article appeared in the New York Times on November 23, 1916 out of the London office.