Britannic's Grand Staircase - Honour and Glory Clock


Colin Renner

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Mar 12, 2009
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I've seen the illustrations of the stairs, but they don't seem to be able to answer my question: was there an Honor and Glory Crowning Time clock fitted into that particular staircase, if only to fit in with the Olympic and Titanic?
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>...if only to fit in with the Olympic and Titanic?<<

I have the impression from this that you mean a ship other then either the Olympic and Titanic. If this is the case, exactly what ship would you be referring to?

If it's the Britannic, to my knowladge, the clock was never fitted as the ship was at least partly stripped of some of her fittings for wartime service. That it was fitted on the Olympic is a documented fact courtesy of a well known photo of the Olympic's Grand Staircase.

If it's the Titanic you're referring to, there has been some controversy over that. Some aspects of the Titanic's fitting out were a bit rushed in order to get the ship into service after several delays. As a possible consequence of this, the clock may have been left on the beach as fitting it in was not a priority. Since no photos of the Titanic's intact Grand Staircase are known to have survived to the present day, this can't be verified one way or another.
 
Nov 26, 2005
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>>Probably. Harland & Wolff had a habit of building ever larger versions of the same ship. The decor varied some but not by a whole lot.<<

I would agree and really there isn't much reason not to have a clock there since A. it's attractive and B. it's functional. Why fix something that isn't broken? Just my thought.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>Why fix something that isn't broken? Just my thought.<<

White Star and Harland & Wolff probably thought the same. Take a look at a lot of their ships of this period. Same hull form, same long forecastle, and this applied to livestock carriers and passenger ships in equal measure. While they could be innovative at times, they tended to stick with the solid and conservative.
 

Colin Renner

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Mar 12, 2009
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Now that I think about it, why not change it up a little? As the design had already been incorperated in to Titanic (supposedly) and the Olympic.
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,602
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Easley South Carolina
>>that White Star basically had "modified clones" of the same design.<<

That's about the size of it.

>>Now that I think about it, why not change it up a little?<<

They did. Nothing dramatic however. Harland & Wolff's engineering and White Star's preferences tended to be more for the evolutionary...making incremental improvements on what came before...as opposed to revolutionary. Sometimes they even came up with some very cost effective solutions.

The combination reciprocating engines/turbine plant for example. It was powerful enough to make the ship fast enough for a 21 knot oriented service without breaking the bank. It didn't catch on in the long haul but it served well for the time.
 

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