Cabin bathrooms


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What were the cabin bathrooms on Titanic called in the proper British terminology- watercloset? Lou? Crapper?Bathroom?

Im of the assumption the water closet was the area where the toilet was located, and the area with the bath had a different name....

Forgive my ignorance here...
Also, it should be noted that "The Big Piece" had 2 small 'water closet' portholes..Above each porthole was a pipe..I have long wondered what was this pipe used for, and do we have photos from Olympic where such a similar intact pipe can be seen?
Note this photo I snapped on the Big Piece,(at close of St Paul Titanic exhibit, 1999)
an inboard view, of a wc porthole and the aforementioned pipe..

regards

Tarn Stephanos
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On the accommodation plans supplied to First Class passengers the rooms in question are labelled as bath and wc. The wc might also be called a toilet or lavatory but never a 'bathroom' - that usage of the term is strictly American.
 
In the Shipbuilder the reference in the text pages is to: "a private bath and lavatory" with 10 of the 3-berth rooms forward on C-deck having their own private bathrooms.
As Bob advised the deck plans show: Bath and WC.
Fare Rate booklets say: "with Private Bath and Toilet".
 
S

Scott R. Andrews

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Tarn,

The pipe is vent for the drain. It's there for much the same reason that your household sewer pipes have an atmospheric vent on the roof. While there's no sewer gas to vent with the direct overboard discharge type of waste disposal used on these ships, a vent is still required to allow pressure to balance in the soil line. If I recall from the last time I saw the "Big Piece", there is a second vent connection on that plating as well; I suspect one was for the toilet and the other for bathtub. Since both fixtures had trapped drains and both emptied a large amount of water into the drain at any given use, they required atmospheric vents to prevent a vacuum from building in the soil pipe behind the down-flowing mass of water.

BTW, the public lavatories group inboard would have had similar atmospheric vents for the soil pipes, but the common practice was to vent these into a casing from which the air was being exhausted to the outer atmosphere, such as the fidley trunks.

Regards,
Scott Andrews

PS - Did you also notice the round escutcheon plate for the shower cage still affixed to the plating above the location where the bath tub once sat?
 
S

Scott R. Andrews

Guest
Tarn,

Sorry, I didn't read your post carefully enough; you did mention the second vent fitting. As for the two small port holes, look carefully and you will see that one is a bit smaller than the other (9 inches rather than 10 inches IIRC). The smaller one was for the WC.

Regards,
Scott Andrews
 
Hi scott
There was a twisted pipe above each wc porthole, though now there is just one, I think the other one was removed during conservation in VA.....

I have heard they were used for ventilation purposes, as opposed to drainage...Since the pipes ran above the portholes, could they have come down from the above lavatories in B deck ?

Im trying to imagine the appearance and positioning of the pipework in the pre sinking layout.
Im assuming the pipeworks were exposed....

The 2 small portholes were actually equal size...

Someone on another thread made excellent sketches of the Boat deck cabins..I hope they could concider doing sketches of the C-79/C-81 cabins and bathroom areas...

regards

Tarn Stephanos
 
S

Scott R. Andrews

Guest
Hi Tarn,

Yes, they were for ventilation purposes for the drains within that particular bath room and WC. They simply allowed air to be drawn into the soil pipe below each tub and toilet from outside the shell plating. There is nothing on the opposite side of the plating from those pipes but a small opening. Think of it in these terms: if you up-end a large bottle filled with water, the water will not flow smoothly out of the bottle; as the the water flows out, the vacuum formed in the air space above the water still draining from the bottle causes outside air to be drawn into the bottle through the same opening through which the water is attempting to flow out. The result is a stilted, concusive flow of water. If, however, you were to poke a hole in the bottom of the bottle while the water was draining, the flow would suddenly increase and become smooth. Essentially the same thing happens within a drain pipe with no means provided to allow an outside source of air to enter. Further, without an atmospheric vent on the soil pipes the temporary rise in pressure in the drain lines from air being pushed ahead of a large column of water (say, from the toilet being flushed) will force some of this air out of the nearest opening offering the least amount of resistance; absent the atmospheric vent, this will most likely be the drain trap of the tub or sink in the adjoining bath, or possibly the drain trap of a nearby stateroom wash basin. With an atmospheric vent on the line, the water in the traps offers more resistance to the moving air within the drain pipes than does the air column within the small vent pipes, so a sudden rise in pressure in the drain line from a flush or a draining bathtub never forces air and noxious gases into the bath rooms, nor does a sudden drop in pressure ever attempt to draw air into the drain pipe through the sink, tub or toilet traps.

Regards,
Scott Andrews
 
Good post Scott, that makes the purpose of the pipe quite consise and clear..
As it was bent and twisted, Im wondering in its original pre-bent postioning, it ran along the overhead, or perhaps downwards?

Ken's accounts of the Cameron dive indicated lavatories within the wreck seem to have surviving metal walls....

In the first photo, remants of one of those metal walls can bee seen...

regards

Tarn Stephanos
 
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Here is an expanded view of the inboard area of the watercloset remanants on the Big Piece..
As the small porthole on the left has to its left a steel wall remanant, and the right a fragment of the same(bolted to a rib), I have a hunch the porthole to the left was above a toilet, and the porthole to the right above a bath tub.
What do you all think?

Regards

Tarn Stephanos
 
Tarn,

Well if the "Big Piece" is from the correct place of the ship as we know it, i.e. cabins C79 and C81, then (looking from the inside) on the left was the bathroom, and on the right was the wc, as per deck plans.

However I see what you mean about the extra piece of metal on the frame beam, which suggests that on the left was the toilet, and on the right was the bathroom.

The portholes could not be the same. The wc porthole was 10" and the bathroom one was 12", but that's referring to the hole that was cut out in the actual hull. With the porthole installed, the surface area of the glass was smaller.

If what we're seeing is accurate (and not a flipped photo) then the big piece cannot be from C79/C81. It can be from C86/C88 if the piece is indeed from that area in line with the engine casing. If not, there are a number of other possibilities on the port and starboard side.

Daniel.
 
Hi Daniel
I think the Big piece was definatly from the C-79-C-81 area, even exterior photos of Titanic in that same region reveal the two lavatory portholes to be of roughly equal size.....

To the left of the left most porthole, there is a survivng metal partition, and on the beam to the right of that same porthole what appears to be the fragment of a wall section, bolted to a beam.
Such suggests a confined space, no doubt the area for a toilet...

Does this contradict the layout for this area as detailed in Titanic's deck plans?

The view of the photos would be inboard...

regards


Tarn Stephanos
 
Anyone here with a knack for art willing to post a sketch of how the "Big Piece" bath & water closet areas were likly layed out?

Thanks


Tarn Stephanos
 
Tarn,

Thats what I meant, where the big piece suggests was a toilet, on the Titanic, if this section really is from C79/C81, then there was a bathroom there. You can see this for yourself in Susan Wels' book, "Legacy of the World's Greatest Ocean Liner". Or even on Eaton and Haas' deck plans.

Unless we're misinterpreting the other small wall fragment, the big piece may have been incorrectly identified as being from the starboard cabins C79/C81.

Regards,

Daniel.
 
Hi Daniel..
I seem to recall odd numbers on the porthole rims, which itself was proof the big Piece was from the starboard side...
All I can suggest is that the deck plans are wrong.......
Clearly, looking at the above photo, if that metal shard bolded to the rib was part of a wall, there would not have been room for a tub in that area , but there would be room for a toilet.
But its inconsistant with the plans....We have a mystery here...

Regards


Tarn Stephanos
 
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