Cabin F-180


Arun Vajpey

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Based on BB's Titanic Deck plans, It appears that the Third Class cabin F-180 was just aft of the No:6 hatch in the stern section. If that is the case, what would form the fore-side wall (the wall towards the bow) of that cabin?

Also, being centrally located, there would be no portholes for such cabins. Did that mean F-180 was windowless?
 

TimTurner

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Yes, it was windowless, but the corridor just outside went the full width of the ship and there was a window at each end.

The forward bulkhead would have been the wall separating it from the cargo hatch. There was a wall there, it wasn't open to the cargo hatch. Is that your question?
 
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Arun Vajpey

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Yes, it was windowless, but the corridor just outside went the full width of the ship and there was a window at each end.

The forward bulkhead would have been the wall separating it from the cargo hatch. There was a wall there, it wasn't open to the cargo hatch. Is that your question?
Yes, that answers my question, thank you.
I was thinking that a centrally located aft cabin like F-180 could have an air pocket trapped within during the sinking for up to a minute after the stern section sank.
 

TimTurner

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It might have, but a few things to consider:
The door to F180 was rear facing, so the air 2ould have easily escaped. What your looking for is a cabin or room with forward or a side facing door.

Remember that just because there is a wall on the blueprints doesn't mean that it was water tight. Small openings around pipes wires a fixtures would have let air escape pretty quickly.

What you really want is a room on the forward side of a watertight bulkhead.
 

Arun Vajpey

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The door to F180 was rear facing, so the air 2ould have easily escaped.

.
But how quickly? The Titanic sank by the bow and so up until the stern itself submerged, there would be air above (to the rear of) F-180 and so the air within the cabin would not have displaced. Even after the stern submerged, parts of it would take a short time to flood within and I was wondering if this applied to Cabin F-180?
 

TimTurner

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The air would have exited out as fast as the water came in (air is more fluid than water, so it will always win this kind of race).

Air is compressible, where water isn't. The air would have displaced into the space occupied by the other air and the pressure would have increased slightly. Its impossible to tell how long it would have taken for any art of the stern to flood for certain.
 

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