Cabin keys


Oct 27, 2005
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This might be a really stupid question but did each cabin have it's own key? like today's cardkeys? if so, when and where did the passengers get their keys to their respective rooms?
 
Oct 27, 2005
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so that means that when the passengers wanted to get into their cabins...they had to call their stewards? explain better please...sorry for the iconvienience(i know that's not the correct way to write it)
 

Brian Ahern

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Dec 19, 2002
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Joao,
I believe the cabins were generally kept unlocked. If passengers had valuables they were worried about, they could put them in the purser's safe.
While the ship was sinking, survivors recalled stewards going around locking stateroom doors. It seems it was something very noteworthy to people, leaving me to believe it hadn't happened yet during the voyage.
 

Bernard Reece

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Oct 31, 2005
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Hi all this is my first post.
Can any one tell me is there any records of the dead and the survivors if there is can you access them.
regards bern
 
Oct 27, 2005
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i think this site has a pretty good list of survivors and deaths. The best I've seen actually. I think it's in Topics Lost and Saved...might be wrong though...
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>so that means that when the passengers wanted to get into their cabins...they had to call their stewards?<<

Nope. As Brian said, the cabins were routinely unlocked. That would be unthinkable today, but in this respect, the Edwardian era was a very different world and nobody gave it a second thought.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>No. He means that the routine was for them to be left unlocked round the clock.<<

That's exactly what I mean. Again, it may be hard to us to grasp something like that these days. With personal security on everybody's mind, it's very hard for us to imagine a time when the doors were left unlocked even in a few urban areas. The Edwardain era was one such time.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Many of those 1st Class passengers wouldn't have carried house keys either. It was their expectation that servants would be on hand to look after their property in their absence, and to let them in if the front door happened to be locked when they returned at any hour of the night or day. When travelling they expected no less from the servants of the shipping line.
 
Oct 27, 2005
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Thanks you so much now it's all so clear. speaking about cabins, if you go "General Titanica" i had a dream concerning a cabin, could you all go there and check it out?
 
May 3, 2005
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Would the vacant cabins have been locked or unlocked ?
And according to some reports, there were quite a lot of vacant cabins in all classes.
There is one story about a Mother trying to find her children during the sinking. They had been using a vacant cabin as a playroom.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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A wild guess on my part, but I'd bet that they were locked. There really wouldn't be many good reasons for them to be open and having them secure would mean that the hotel staff wouldn't really have to worry about keeping them in order. Perhaps Bob Godfrey has something a bit more definitive on that.
 
May 3, 2005
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>>A wild guess on my part, but I'd bet that they were locked.<<

That would be my guess, too. But I'm biasing my opinion as a 2005 frequent motel tourist. What with key cards and all that on motels, that is....the vacant rooms in motels are definitely locked to all but the staff.....However, 1912 was not 2005....Maybe the stewards made special concessions for the children in the reference to their using the vacant room or rooms for playrooms ? ......
 

matthew ewing

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Oct 10, 2005
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I was reading the posts and was just wondering, how many of the valued things you think are gone that the passengers had due to corrosion, bacteria and whatever else is that deep down, and graverobbing
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>However, 1912 was not 2005<<

Indeed it wasn't, and one other factor that would serve as a deterrant to unwelcome intruders is the possibility of "severe consequences" for being caught in places where they didn't belong, with having the pogies kicked out of them and arrest being the mildest. In some places, breaking and entering was likely to be greeted with an awesome display of firepower!

>>Maybe the stewards made special concessions for the children in the reference to their using the vacant room or rooms for playrooms ? <<

It's possible. One of the mandates the hotel staff had was to do whatever was possible to make the journey more comfortable and it wouldn't be much of a stretch to have arrangements made for a spare room opened up for the kiddies to play in.

>>how many of the valued things you think are gone that the passengers had due to corrosion, bacteria and whatever else is that deep down<<

Depends on what it was. If one is talking about stones and precious metals, quite a bit of it may well survive to this day. If one is talking about organic remains such a paper money, unless it's protected somehow, most of that is probably long gone.

>>and graverobbing.<<

What graverobbing? If you're talking about salvage, then it would depend on what's been recovered from the debris field since the ship itself is off limits. (The caveat is that at least one possible illegal expedition may have been out there but there's no way of telling what if anything they may have nicked from the wrecksite)

In any event, it might be wise to be careful about throwing about inflammatory terms such as "Grave robbing." The disdain for salvage is not a sentiment universally shared or agreed upon. Some of our boards most respected members have taken part in RMS Titanic Inc.'s salvage expeditions and public expositions. They don't see it as graverobbing. They see it as the preservation of history.
 

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