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Aug 15, 2005
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"They don't see it as graverobbing. They see it as the preservation of history."

That's a topic that I'm tossed up on.
I see it as grave robbing, yet at the same time, want there to be artefacts remaining for the future generations to remember our ship by.

Some days I feel disgust, and others I think, "Yeah, great. She won't be there forever, afterall."
 
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Adam Tarzwell

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My opinion on the matter of salvage and expedition is I think while we still can there should be as many expeditions as their can be to try and get into the ship as deep as the possibly can go. Bring back lots of images and video of the ship its self but in terms of taking artifacts.... I think everything sank there for a reason in the early hours of April 15th, 1912 and I think they should stay there. That's my opinion. Visit the site as much as you want but leave everything in peace. I did go to the travelling expedition a few years back with all the artifacts and yes it was an amazing experiance and I was astounded but I kind of think its disrespectful to the people who lived and the loved ones they lost. We are disturbing their final resting place....
 
Aug 15, 2005
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Well said, Adam!

I couldn't have put that better myself.
I think It's because I love to go to these exhibits and say to myself, "Look - There! THAT is a piece of THE Titanic!" that I feel the way I do about salvage.
And yes - We should go deeper into the wreck and get as many images as we possibly can before it's too late.
 
Nov 18, 2004
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Mr Standart

What is your source for the claim that passengers did not keys. I am generally curious on topic and would love to read-up a bit more.

Chris
 
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Adam Tarzwell

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It must have been annoying if a passenger locked themselves out of their room and have to go and find a steward hehe.
 
Aug 15, 2005
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Well, that really is a bummer to learn, Mr. Godfrey!

That's a big portion of my novel that needs rectifying now.

Sh...
100395.jpg
 
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Adam Tarzwell

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>>Not in 3rd Class - no keys to worry about there. No locks on the doors!

Oh my!!! It could have been a free for all down there. In this day and age you would never dream of leaving your room unattended without it being locked! What about in 2nd class? Did they have locking doors?
 

Trevor Powell

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Aug 22, 2005
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>>What about in 2nd class? Did they have locking doors?<<

Yes, Adam, the second class cabins had doors with locks. Ellen Walker (who recently passed away this month) owned Her mother(Kate Phillips)'s second class cabin keys which left the Titanic with her.
 

Noel F. Jones

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May 14, 2002
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I can't speak for Titanic but it was the general custom for passengers to be in possession of the keys to their own rooms which they could lock or leave open as they wished.

The bedroom stewards/stewardesses worked with a section pass key when servicing the rooms.

In practice, when on passage only the most paranoid passengers would actually leave their rooms locked when they were about the decks.

In port was another matter; then it was advised that rooms be locked at all times. If going ashore at wayports, transit passengers were advised to lodge their key with the bureau. This provided a check on who was ashore and who wasn't when departure time became imminent. Of course this was not applicable to an express transatlantic passage.

Noel
 

Gary.J Bell

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May 30, 2004
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Hi
Im was wondering if anyone knew if the First and Second Class cabins were locked once the Titanic began to sink? I have heard of cases were some people were nearly locked in their cabins due to Stewards not checking if anyone was inside first, and this seems to lead to a yes on the question. But with such a short time to lock all cabins on A B C D and maybe E Deck, maybe they were not locked. And as for Second Class, were they locked?
 
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Dalles McKinsey

Guest
Hello everyone. This is my very first post. I discovered this message board earlier this evening. I am a descendent of Ernest Edward Samuel Freeman which as some of you may know was not only the personal secretary to Mr. Ismay but he was also Chief Deck Steward on the Titanic. His body was recovered as body # 239
I know a little about Titanic from family accounts. Before the ship set sail they did have a introduction party to introduce the employees to the ship and to get them familiar with the layout. I do have some personal affects from Titanic, a set of keys that was found with my gr-gr grandfather. I know that one of the keys went to a desk, another to a safe and I assume a master key for any locked doors.
Although it is true that most of the cabins didn't have actual locks on them, they did have locking chests/cabinets and the most valuables were stores in safes. Anyway, I look forward to reading your posts.

Thanks!
Dalles
 
Jun 4, 2003
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Just wondering: since there aren't any keys for the staterooms' doors, I would have to sleep in my cabin at night with an unlocked door? I would not like this at all in any case!!!
 
Jul 9, 2000
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I think you could have locked the door from the inside if yoiu wanted to. Even if not, remember that this was a different age with some different attitudes.

These days, if you defend yourself from an intruder, you might just find yourself facing charges. Back then, if you beat the living snot out of an intruder or blew him away with your trusty six-shooter, it would tend to be understood that he had it coming to him.

That sort of attitude had a wonderful effect on discouraging unwelcome midnight visitations.
 
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