Cabins for stewardesses

Oct 9, 2015
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I was looking over the number of stewardesses and the number of cabins and was just wondering if anyone had any idea about how the cabins were divided/how many rooms stewardesses were in charge of? I realize that most passengers had valets and maids, but the ratio of rooms to victualing crew seems a bit staggering. No? Maybe thats just me?

And the bell system. I'm having a hard time figuring that out. Did the passengers ring a bell that connected to a stewardesses corresponding room? So only the stewardess assigned to that cabin would be notified of a passenger needing their assistance? Or did it go to a general room, and whichever stewardess was available went to the passengers aid?
 

Charles

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Mar 28, 2015
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Hey Everyone,

As you guys may know, there are 14 Stewardesses that served First Class, 4 that served Second Class, and 1 (the matron) that served Third Class onboard Titanic.

-While I was looking at the possible locations of stewardesses, I learned that Sara Stap (the apparent Chief Stewardess) served and stayed on A-Deck by herself.

-Jane Kate Gold and Annie Martin (friends) was on B-Deck.

-the famous Violet Jessop, Elizabeth Leather, Mary Sloan, and Evelyn Marsden all were on C-Deck (Leather/Jessop in the forward section, and Sloan/Marsden in the aft section, leaving an empty midships).

-Alice Prichard and Katherine Smith were on D-Deck

-Annie Robinson was on E-Deck with another unknown person

(Thanks to Craig Stringer)

The remaining First Class Stewardesses are Mary Roberts, Mary Gregson, Mabel Bennett, and Hypatia (Harriet) McLaren. The empty C-Deck cabin seemed to only hold 2 Stewardesses, and Annie Robinson apparently shared her cabin with someone else, leaving 1 stewardess without a cabin.


I was wondering if anyone can clear this up.

Regards,
Charles
 

Charles

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Mar 28, 2015
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One more thing, I read that Mary Roberts shared with Mary Gregson, while Mabel Bennett with Hypatia McLaren (just FYI)
 

vonfrieddorf

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Jun 10, 2016
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Well, Charles ...

Altogether, there were 23 female crew aboard: two restaurant cashiers (technically not crew, as they were employed by Gatti), two Turkish bath attendants, one steerage matron, four second class stewardesses; leaving 14 stewardesses in first class. All are paired, as you have them above, except for Miss Stap and Mrs. Robinson. With an even number, if one is alone in a room, then another one must needs be. That would indicate that either Mrs. Robinson was quartered with another pair of stewardesses, or that she was alone in a cabin.

Hope that helps.
 

Charles

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Mar 28, 2015
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All are paired, as you have them above, except for Miss Stap and Mrs. Robinson. With an even number, if one is alone in a room, then another one must needs be. That would indicate that either Mrs. Robinson was quartered with another pair of stewardesses, or that she was alone in a cabin.
Yes I understand. However, Miss Stap apparently was by herself on A-Deck, and I see no 3-stewardess rooms on board. Is it possible that maybe one stewardess quartered herself in an empty first class cabin?