Cabins on boat deck


Nigel Bryant

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Aug 1, 2010
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Beside cabins for the use of officers, Titanic had a selection of cabins for first-class passengers on this deck. There were about five staterooms located here in total, quite small but none the less comfortable. These staterooms were marked from W to Z, I think. Also on the portside for these staterooms was a public W.C and bathroom for these staterooms.

Best,

Nigel
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Yes, Lee. Across the centreline between the two rows of passenger cabins. On the deckplan onsite they are shown as an 'island' of 3 adjoining rooms labelled 'Marconi'. From port (top) to starboard these were Silent Room, Marconi Room, bedroom.
 
Apr 24, 2003
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Can anyone of you tell me why they installed more cabins for passengers on the titanic than the olympic had (especially on the boat deck and A-deck), although in 1912 it was unusual that the cabin place were sold out( because of the big competition) and the additional cabins would certainly remain empty.
Why haven´t they used the space for more public rooms to make the ship more attractive? Maybe a little theater or cinema? Or a childrens playroom?
Remember for example the childrens playroom on the Britannic. Why didn´t they install such improvements on the Titanic? I mean, its not difficult to imagine that one would need something like this.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
It was a streightforward business decision made with an eye towards increasing the ship's earning potential. While some of these berths would remain vacant during slow times of the year, they would tend to fill up when business picked up for whatever season was popular for vacations.
 
Apr 24, 2003
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Michael,
in my opinion, in the years before the First world war ocean liners never were sold out ( big competition, big supply but less demand ) - even in the vacation season ( in the summer). I think White Star knew that, so in my eyes your argumentation doesnt make sense. To make a comparison: During the great depression time in the thirtees the French Liner "Normandie" only had room for about 1800 passengers but lot of room for public space ( I know, the Normandie was subsidized, Titanic not). Could it be that they installed more cabins on titanic to get more prestige for the ship? Having the biggest number of berths means having more prestige?
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>in my opinion, in the years before the First world war ocean liners never were sold out <<

Fair enough...now what are the facts that can be found in the documentation? I doubt any ship ever sold out to 100% capacity, but the capacity wouldn't be there in the first place unless there was a perceived demand at the time which...in the view of the owners...made it worthwhile. Simply put, the shipping lines wouldn't spend the money for it if they thought there wasn't a reasonable chance to get a return on the investment.

Could prestige have been a part of it?

Sure.

But I believe it unlikely that this would be their only motivation. They still had to answer to stockholders after all.
 

Bob Godfrey

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>>a perceived demand at the time<<

And in the future. Ocean liners were designed with at least a 20-year working life in mind, and White Star might well have been responding to existing trends which suggested ever-increasing wealth and a growing demand for First Class travel in the social and business sectors. The Great War, the Stock Market crash and worldwide Depression could not have been foreseen.
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Hi!

This is an interesting topic. I'm late, as always.

With regard to capacities, liners such as Imperator were carrying 3,600 passengers prior to the war. Olympic's first class was solid on a number of occasions. As long as one class can sell out, it will need more cabins; but you don't need the whole ship to be fully booked for one class to need more cabins. Variety is also an option. Even if a ship is two-thirds full the extra capacity can come in handy, and as others have opined increasing the earning potential of a vessel was important.

I agree with what Bob said as to future trends. One interesting point is that extra cabins were needed even in the 1930s, and even with the poor economic climate that had not been foreseen. Majestic had additional tourist class cabins added in 1935, while in 1932 Olympic found her tourist class accommodation booked in excess of capacity on at least one occasion -- with 600 passengers in that class alone.

Best regards,

Mark.
Rambler's Annoymous.
 
Jun 4, 2003
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Hi Again! What about the aft grand staircase? Only a few really know its existence. Who would choose an A-deck cabin there? Possibly someone who would get off the ship the nest day, like Father Brown. Don't you think it would have been too noisy with all those people there? I would not select for myself, though! Thank you!
 
Mar 20, 2007
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Wasn't Thomas Andrews housed in one of the handful of staterooms (I think there may have been only two) located at the top of the aft Grand Staircase? Father Browne, I believe, was in the other.
 
May 25, 2007
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Yes, Father Browne was in A-37 on the starboard side, while Thomas Andrews was in A-36, on the port side. And yes, there were only two of these cabins. They were the aft-most A-Deck staterooms.
 

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