Cafe Parisian

  • Thread starter Matthew Charles O'Brien
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Matthew Charles O'Brien

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Hello all,

Was the Cafe Parisian run by the staff of the restaurant proper? Was a full menu served here if it was?

Happy New Year,

~Matt
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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The CP was promoted as a replica of a Parisian sidewalk cafe, a place where friends could meet for conversation with drinks (coffee or something stronger) and light refreshments. Unlike the Verandah Cafe (Palm Court) areas on A deck above, there were no White Star stewards allocated to work there, so I assume it was run by Mr Gatti as a sideline to his a la carte restaurant, and that the two Frenchmen in his staff of predominantly Italian waiters were the 'genuine French waiters' who were said to be part of the attraction of the CP. Not one of the White Star crew of 1st Class saloon stewards (waiters) was French.
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Hitch

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Jan 6, 2006
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I have two small questions:

1. Could you also only drink something in 'Cafe?'

2. This may sound silly, but is it 'Cafe Parisian,' with an 'A' or is it 'Cafe Parisien' with a 'E' ?

The reason why I'm asking this is because in two books of mine about Titanic, they always write it 'Cafe Parisien' but online they write it 'Cafe Parisian,' and sometimes 'Cafe Parisien'

Can someone please help me out?
Thank you so much.
happy.gif
 

Bob Godfrey

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On the deck plans which the WSL gave out to their passengers it was spelled Parisien. I've no doubt that you could sit there and eat, drink or do neither without risk of being asked to leave!
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

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Hi everyone!

I recently heard a rumour that new-married young couples in honeymoon usually have dinner in the Cafe Parisien. Would it be possible? Thanks
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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It might be possible, but I can't see the attraction. Would be like taking your new bride to the best restaurant in town and then asking them to set up a table for two on the pavement outside. Honeymoon couples generally don't want to draw attention to themselves! :)
 
Sep 1, 2004
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I recall reading somewhere that the passengers could eat "al fresco" - on the fresh air. SO I suppose that they could eat in the café too.
 
Mar 20, 2007
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The Cafe Parisien was intended as an alternative venue for mid-morning refreshment or afternoon tea. Those electing to dine in the a la carte restaurant could follow up their repast with a liqueur sipped amidst the wicker and ivy. Looking at photographs, I see a dresser at one end of the room for crockery and a sort of multi-tiered circular buffet. Presumably, sandwiches, cakes and pastries were laid out there at certain times of day, from which passengers could choose what they wanted.

Unlike you, Bob, I do see the cafe's attraction. It must have been lovely to sip and nibble and people-watch in the fresh air, as the Atlantic slipped past the open windows. I recall reading that the cafe was very popular with the 'younger set' in first-class - or those who fancied themselves as young. Didn't Mrs Candee adjourn there with some members of 'Our Coterie' after dinner on Sunday night, until the cold drove them all inside? No matter who the clients, the brief success of the Cafe Parisien aboard the 'Titanic' inspired the White Star Line to fit a more elaborate version aboard the 'Olympic' soon after the disaster.
 
Dec 29, 2006
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I was looking at a TV documentary about the Olympic class ocean liners the other day, and it suddenly occurred to me that the Cafe Parisian seemed to be full of ivy; was this real ivy and, if so, were there have been problems with insects?
 

Aly Jones

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Dec 15, 2019
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Hi standly, you wouldn't believe what I was thinking the other day? I was thinking since there was no fly screens on Titanic, how did they cope with flys and insects in the cafe partisan, the bridge, gym etc...

I'm not sure if its real ivy or not. Let's hope someone more knowledge can help you out with ur question. I would like to know, also think this will make a great discussion.
I was looking at a TV documentary about the Olympic class ocean liners the other day, and it suddenly occurred to me that the Cafe Parisian seemed to be full of ivy; was this real ivy and, if so, were there have been problems with insects?
 
May 3, 2005
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I was looking at a TV documentary about the Olympic class ocean liners the other day, and it suddenly occurred to me that the Cafe Parisian seemed to be full of ivy; was this real ivy and, if so, were there have been problems with insects?
I'm trying to recall if we ever had any problems with insects during my sea duty.
None that I remember.
But my question is whether or not you have more or less problems with insects on a ship at sea ?
While in port ?
 
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Aly Jones

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Dec 15, 2019
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I had notice that Olympic class liners had plants everywhere on board. I know for a fact spiders love living in trees (we used to have real xmas trees) and found spiders were living in the trees.. So I'm wondering if they had a spider problems on board???
 

Tim Gerard

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Feb 26, 2019
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I was able to find, Cafe Parisien had specifically English Ivy, which apparently today is considered an invasive species in parts of the US, particularly the Northwest.
 

Stephen Carey

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Apr 28, 2016
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You don't get flies at sea - nothing for them to live on... Cockroaches however thrive, one of the reasons why inspections are so thorough, but you still can't get rid of the buggers. I was never on a ship that had fly screens and we only opened the ports at sea, not in port owing to noise, dust and... flies... Once air conditioning became the norm, the windows and ports wouldn't open anyway on the more modern ships otherwise you'd destroy the air con.
As for the ivy, it could have been either cloth replica or real. A dose of Flit from the Flit spray would fettle any beasties living in them, and "poison ivy" is not something you get in UK!
 
Aug 18, 2020
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F.G. Bealing and son, in Highfield, Southampton supplied the palms, plants and flowers for Titanic, Olympic and other WSL vessels.

In “Titanic Voices”: “Bealing’s may also have provided the ivy climbing the trellised walls of the Cafe Parisien, Palm Court and Verandah Cafe, although as some of this was photographed by H&W’s own photographer it is not clear if this work was already done in Belfast, or the photographer came to Southampton on the crossing from Belfast.”
 
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