Californian menu & pc


Status
Not open for further replies.
Jun 10, 1999
1,284
21
313
ATTN: Jason Tiller -

Hi Jason, thanks for alerting us to an auction containing the above noted. Would you happen to know the end results? Or, if there are any images available on-line? I surmize these *rare* Californian collectibles garnered high interest, ala items pertaining to Carpathia.

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 
Jun 10, 1999
1,284
21
313
First and foremost, pardon my mispelling of the "Ship that stood still". You posted a brief note on ET news (see past additions). The site is Ballmoney, Co. Antrim, and the auction notification was published in the Belfast Telegraph.

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 

Senan Molony

Member
Jun 28, 1998
1,690
18
313
Dublin
Read this closely -

"The auction organisers have up for sale a postcard of the SS California, a menu card dated 17 April 1913, and a "View Scotland by Anchor Line" postcard again showing the SS California.

The Anchor Line's California is not the Leyland Line's Californian.

End of confusion.

Practically worthless cards, then - misunderstood but one hopes not mis-sold.

There are no specific Californian printed postcards that I am aware of, apart from ones that may be overwritten.

I have one or two postcards written by Captain Lord, but they do not show the Californian. They are from a later timeframe in any case, as the Californian was sunk in WW1.

Mixing up California and Californian is quite common, and may be knowingly done by some sellers on eBay.

The confusion existed in 1912. California called to Queenstown that year and Fr Browne is one who notes there were some who would not go in her - highly ironic and utterly ignorant, as Californian rushed to the scene as soon as she became aware of the emergency and was the second ship there.

The California didn't get there, but it seems harsh to blame her if she was hundreds of miles away, or in port!
 
Jun 10, 1999
1,284
21
313
Thanks Senan, I stand corrected, perhaps my reason for the intital mispelling of the vessel. However the auction house noted the California in relation to the Titanic disaster.
The only postcard even close to a Californian is the one you featured in an ET article, the same one I have, which states "______leaving Boston".

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 
Jun 10, 1999
1,284
21
313
EPILOGUE post: Myself having slithered from a rock = California and hardplace = Californian and in a world of misinformation, and with retrospect, I would have been spared some embarassment had a *labled* Lordite (Albeit I did miss it myself) caught the misleading, in relation to Titanic auction article in Nov. of this year. FYI, the postcard I mention in post 1202 can be seen @ GreatShips.com. You will have to search for it..."Liner leaving Boston" it is featured in an anonymouse column. You will note that in my intial post and acting on subconsious, I labled the topic heading CALIFORNIAN...so thanks again to our beloved Senan for coming about with his boat ;-)


Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
Member
Aug 20, 2000
8,239
29
398
Niagara Falls, Ontario
19th of November was your adding to the news forum on this Belfast, Telegraph article

Oh, that article.

"The auction organisers have up for sale a postcard of the SS California, a menu card dated 17 April 1913, and a "View Scotland by Anchor Line" postcard again showing the SS California.

Exactly the reason why I couldn't recall posting an article about items up for auction, from the Californian.

As Senan remarked, the writer of said article obviously made a common error.
 

Senan Molony

Member
Jun 28, 1998
1,690
18
313
Dublin
Hi Ioannis,

You have caused me to correct myself. It was the Allan liner California that called to Queenstown, not the Anchor Line vessel of the same name. My mistake.

The Anchor Line went direct from Scotland, but the Allan Liners frequently called in Ireland, principally at Moville, Co Donegal.
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Jul 4, 2000
6,359
375
433
It was the Allan liner California that called to Queenstown, not the Anchor Line vessel of the same name.

The Leyland Line ship, of course, was Californian.

The Allan Line ship was also Californian.

The Anchor Line ship was simply California, with no "n".

White Star's last sailing ship was also California.
 
Mar 18, 2008
2,652
1,153
248
Germany
>>Hi Ioannis,

You have caused me to correct myself. It was the Allan liner California that called to Queenstown, not the Anchor Line vessel of the same name. My mistake.

The Anchor Line went direct from Scotland, but the Allan Liners frequently called in Ireland, principally at Moville, Co Donegal.<<

Hi Senan!

So I correct you without knowing it! I did not notice it. I would if it would be Cunard or White Star but not Allan and Anchor Line!
 

Senan Molony

Member
Jun 28, 1998
1,690
18
313
Dublin
Hi Gents,

Aye, you're right, Mark. Should have been an 'n' on the end of the Allan Liner, as they all ended that way - Corsican, Sardinian, etc. [Shouldn't post at 12.46am.]

Actually there are quite a lot of "Californians" generally, never mind the more common "California."

Here is a 1906 PC of a vessel called the Californian in the Pacific. Seems to stand to reason there would be more of them of this name on the West Coast!

207504.jpg


Think I could offer this at auction with a reserve price of a modest $1,000 ?
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Jul 4, 2000
6,359
375
433
The San Francisco Call, 13 May 1900
Retrieved from the California Digital Newspaper Collection web site,
http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cdnc/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=p&p=home


STEAMSHIP CALIFORNIAN SUCCESSFULLY LAUNCHED
---
Largest Freighter Ever Built Here
---
Another Greater Boat to Follow

---
WHEN the massive hull of the steamship Californian slipped gracefully last
night from the ways at the Union Iron Works and her keel churned the waters
of the bay the event marked the beginning of a new era in shipping on the
Pacific. It sealed the doom of the fleet of sailing ships that have for so
many years monopolized the trade of the Hawaiian Islands and the clipper
ships from New York.

Ten thousand people witnessed the launching, which was a success from every
point of view. A full moon illuminated the scene, and its radiance brought
out in bold relief the great iron hull of the steamer and the crowds of
eager spectators who lined the beach and occupied every point of vantage.
Hundreds of people were admitted to the grounds and watched the busy
workmen, who swarmed about the steamer and rapidly tore away the shores and
spurs. It was 10:10 p. m. before the foreman announced that all was in
readiness.

To Miss Edith Chesebrough, daughter of A. Chesebrough, vice president of the
American-Hawaiian Steamship Company, was accorded the honor of christening
the largest merchantman ever built on this coast. Surrounded by a bevy of
friends and invited guests, she stood upon a platform erected at the bow.
The conventional bottle of champagne hung by a long blue ribbon from the
bulwarks. E. R. Dimond pressed an electric button. There was a crash of
timbers amidship, the great hull trembled violently and then commenced to
move slowly and gracefully down the ways.

"I christen thee Californian," were the words used by Miss Chesebrough as
she swung the bottle back and broke it full upon the bow.

The crowd cheered and the tugs and vessels in the bay saluted shrilly.
Before the cheering had ceased the Californian floated at anchor in the bay.
Among the specially invited guests were the following: Rear Admiral and Mrs.
Beardsley, Miss Helen Chesebrough, A. Chesebrough, Captain Benham, Mr. and
Mrs. E. R. Dimond, Horace Platt, Judge W. B. Cope, Mr. and Mrs. Norman
McLaren, Mr. and Mrs. Tatum, Irving M. Scott; Paul Chesebrough, Louis
Rosenthal, Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Hamilton, Henry Rosenfeld and Louis Rosenfeld.

The Californian is the pioneer of a line of steamships under construction
for the American-Hawaiian Steamship Company to ply between San Francisco,
Honolulu and New York. Her dimensions are: Length over all, 435 feet; beam,
51 feet; depth, 33 feet; gross tonnage, 6000 tons; dead weight carrying
capacity, 6250 tons; horsepower. 2200; speed 10 1/2 knots. Three steamers of
the same size are now on the ways at Philadelphia. The American will be
launched in thirty days, the Hawaiian a month later and the Oregonian before
the end of the year.

Mr. Dimond announced last night that the keel of a steamer of 11,500 tons
register will be laid in a few days on the ways the Californian has just
left, and another of the same size will be built in the East. The six
steamers will give a monthly service between this port, Honolulu and New
York, only stopping on the Chilean coast for coal.

F. H. Turner, who has been appointed chief officer of the Californian, will
take charge of her at once. Captain J. J. P. Morrison, her master, has not
yet arrived from the East. Chief Engineer Chisholm, formerly of the Senator,
will have charge of her mechanical department.

-30-
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads