Cameron to release TITANIC in 3D


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Feb 7, 2005
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Sounds like Cameron is quite passionate about this idea!

I really enjoyed seeing "Ghosts of the Abyss" in 3-D on an IMAX screen (several times). Although not in 3-D, we saw the last of the "Matrix" films on an IMAX screen--an eye-popping experience! This weekend here locally, they're showing "Spiderman II" on an IMAX screen, which is expected to draw a large crowd. It would be fantastic to see "Titanic," "Lord of the Rings," "King Kong," or "Star Wars" (some of the films listed) on a large screen in a 3-D format.

There's nothing like seeing a big movie on a big screen! Adding 3-D would make it even better.

Denise
 
Sep 26, 1999
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I don't think making movies in 3D is what is going to save the industry. Have they thought of lowering the price of admission for a movie ticket?

[Moderator's note: This post was in another thread outside of this subtopic, but has been moved to the pre-existing one on the same subject. JDT]
 
Jul 9, 2000
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I wonder if releasing the flick in 3-d would do a lot of good. It isn't as if the technology to make anything in 3-d is much of a secret. It's been around for years and copyright pirates rarely have a lot of trouble in keeping up with security measures.

Further, could anyone stand to watch it for three+ hours? My understanding is that the glasses needed for the format can give you the Mother of All Migraines after about an hour.
 
Mar 3, 1998
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I'm not going to get all excited about this. My read on this is that it's typical Cameron...he sees the way forward and is essentially saying, "Come on, let's go, I'll take the first step if need be." I don't read his comments to mean that he's literally planning on making a 3D version of "Titanic," at least not in the immediate future.

Parks
 

Andrew Epps

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Feb 15, 2005
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I think Parks is right, it is not all about Cameron remastering Titanic in 3D, It is about steering the industry towards new technology, namely Digital 3D. Digital 3D overcomes a lot of the obstacles and challenges of conventional 3D technology that as Michael stated has been around for decades. I do agree with Darren that simply cranking out crap in 3D will not do a thing to save the industry. However, A good new film that embraces the new format and does not go for the gimmicky gratuitous "3D comin' at ya" shot can definitely be a great experience. What is killing the movie industry now is that there is a TON of films coming out and there is too much "style over substance" and while there is a faction of the paying audience that will go see anything, there is a growing number of people that are growing weary of the cookie cutter formula films that the major studios are cranking out. There is also the issue of theaters that need to keep up to date with the technology and insure that they can give audiences as good of an experience as they can now get at home. of course that is just my opinion...
 
Mar 3, 1998
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I was talking with Earthship Productions today about another subject and toward the end of the conversation, asked about this latest news article. Come to find out, Earthship has been deluged with calls today from people asking to get in on the "Titanic 3D" project. If you're thinking about calling, you will be told -- as has been everyone else -- that there is no such project in the works.

The article mentioned above was not announcing a new project, so please don't call to apply. There's nothing to apply for. Besides, Earthship wouldn't be doing that work, anyway..."Titanic" belongs to the studios (Paramount and Fox).

Parks
 

Andrew Epps

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I don't think that there would be a call or need for anyone "getting in on it" other than the staff that would be needed to sit in front of a computer and render the 3D effect from the digitized elements of the original film.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>of course that is just my opinion...<<

And I don't think you're the only one who holds to it. If the movie industry wants to "save itself," they'll need to do way more then just thrown new gimmicks into the work. A flick could have all the whiz bang golly gee whiz willikers wow technology that one could dream of stuffed into it, but if it's a lousy story that draws no interest, nobody is going to pay attention. They sure as hell won't pony up the cash for admission.
 
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Donna Grizzle

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I am one of those weird people that actually prefers seeing movies in a theater. I say weird because 99% of people I know would tell me they prefer to watch a movie at home. I think it's the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard of. I CAN'T watch a movie at home...impossible. The phone's ringing, my cat's are knocking things over, people are just walking in and out of my house. Pretty much, if I don't see it in the theater, I'll never see it.

Now, what do I think is killing the movie industry? Well, if you're like one of my friends who doesn't like going to see a movie in the theater, you don't have to! Surely you can wait 3 months for the movie to come out on dvd, heck not even so long now with all this piracy going on. If you hate the theater that much, you can just "tough it out" and wait for the dvd release. They're getting these movies out of the theater and onto dvd way too fast. I don't even get to see half the movies that I want to in the theater because they're gone in the blink of an eye.

Now granted, timing in seeing a movie in the theater is essential. Unless it was a Titanic movie, there's no way I'd be going to see it opening weekend. Uh uh, I'll calmly wait for that Monday morning matinee when all the little kiddies are in school.

It also wouldn't hurt if they could lower the price of concessions, namely the popcorn and soda! Ridiculous, but I buy it anyway. When I go to the movies I go all out for that movie experience and it of course wouldn't be complete without popcorn.

3D is definitely cool for action/adventure, horror movies but it won't work for everything. I'd have no desire to see the latest Jane Austin adaptation in 3D, but Titanic???? Bring it on! I've just been dying to see it in the theater again anyway for the last 8 years, 3D or not!
 
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Matt Pereira

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I used to enjoy watching movies that were 3D didnt care much for the glasses much that you have to wear to watch the movie but id watch Camerons Titanic if it was done in 3D be something different than a war film or a gangster film that is in 3D i dont think a film based off of a true story has ever been in 3D
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>I am one of those weird people that actually prefers seeing movies in a theater.<<

So do I...if it's known to be a good movie. I don't think that a flick like Titanic or any of the Star Wars series looks all that swift on the telly unless you have a widescreen.

>>Now, what do I think is killing the movie industry?<<

I think that misreading the target aurdiance has a lot to do with it. Besides, as you said, why shell out the cost of the ticket and the pricey snacks when you can see it on HBO or get a DVD and watch it anytime you want to. No gas being guzzled and you can even get past the endless previews if you know what buttons to click.

I wouldn't mind the price of the popcorn if the butter they were using on it was really butter. Instead, they're going more and more to these neferious toppings and melted "spreads" which are supposed to be heart smart, but all they did was make me ill!
 
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I kind of agree with you, Donna, about movies in a theater. While it is way too expensive to do frequently (at least for me), there are some films that were meant for the big screen...by that I mean, the impact seems to be more powerful.

DVD's at home are nice for times when you just want to "veg" and relax and are a great option to be able to see your favorites over and over without shelling out extra money. The only thing about home viewing is that distractions kind of "break the mood" of the film. But the up side is that you can pause it and not miss a thing.

I completely agree with Michael about such films as Star Wars...they were meant for the big screen.

But, it is nice having the option of either method of viewing. And, since films manage to make their way to DVD in 6-8 months, you won't have to wait forever to see something (just don't let anyone tell you what happens).
 
Jul 9, 2000
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What I like about home viewing is that you don't have to put up with a crowd of a couple hundred people and all the idiosycracies they bring with them...like uncontrollable kids, ringing cellphones and pagers, some idiot giving a play by play of the whole film...you get the picture.

Also, I can get coffee and snacks the way I like it, when I want to, without having to deal with pricetags marked "Arm leg and Firstborn" and not miss a thing.
 
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Donna Grizzle

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Michael- I'm tellin' ya...Monday morning(or earliest showing) matinee. Any weekday will do really but if you ever have the opportunity to do it on a Monday, that is the time to go my friend. I don't think I've ever been to one where there was more than 10 people in the theater. Holidays are the exception, as is the entire summer unfortunately because all the kids are out of school, but even then still, it's the best time to go.

I think my friends and I are going to brave it when Poseidon comes out. We'll probably go that Friday night which tells you how much I've been looking forward to this film!
 
Jul 9, 2000
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I've done the Monday matinee thing and it does have it's virtues. I love going into a cinima when a flick is at the hight of it's popularity only to find it practically empty. No squalling kids, no ringing pagers and cellphones and the popcorn is actually fresh. Fortunately, I have a variable work schedule which makes that possible. If I had to keep bankers hours, it just wouldn't happen.

Now if only they would wake up and do away with those bloody previews! One or two are fine. Half a dozen spanning nearly half an hour....grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!!!!!!!!!
angry.gif
 

Dan Cherry

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Dec 14, 1999
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I attended the opening night of Titanic here back in '97; the theater was only about 25% filled - no bawling 'tweens', no hard-of-hearing non-English speaking person asking for a translation from his seat-mate; by the time I attended the January 1, 1998 viewing at the invitation of friends, it was a different story. I could have made a killing selling tissue to the multitudes of 9-13 year olds.
 
Jul 12, 2003
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I feel the same way Michael....get rid of the previews. Plus, here in California, the theater runs commericals, still ads and trivia games BEFORE the previews. It seems like the time it takes to run those (which they manage to do twice sometimes) equals the length of a film.
 
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