Cameron's Apology


Jun 12, 2004
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Mike-

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This tends to keep the habital part of the house above any likely storm surge.
This would seem to be pointless in some storms like hurricanes that are so vast that elevation of these homes would have to be space needle-height to avoid being caught in said storms. But I can see preparing for certain eventualities.


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I'll bet some of Titanic's officers and crew had a thing or several dozen to say about some of the ports they've been to and what they would do to their pay packets.
What kind of pay do mariners (officers and crew) earn nowadays? It's likely more than in 1912, but, with inflation, spending is relative, allowing for just as much of a struggle as seafarers in the past.

I can imagine that [some] ports would likely be like amusement parks to many of them, where blowing all one's money would be like sneezing, especially those sailors seeking, er, companionship for a night or two. ;)

I would be curious about that in which the seafarers of 1912 commonly engaged while in port.​
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>This would seem to be pointless in some storms like hurricanes that are so vast that elevation of these homes would have to be space needle-height to avoid being caught in said storms. But I can see preparing for certain eventualities.<<

It seems to work well enough that they continue to do it this way.

>>What kind of pay do mariners (officers and crew) earn nowadays?<<

Can't really speak to that since my service was with the military and not the merchent navy.

>>especially those sailors seeking, er, companionship for a night or two. ;) <<

I'll invoke the Fifth Amendment on that!
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Jun 12, 2004
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It seems to work well enough that they continue to do it this way.
I was only kidding, Mike, hehe. The stilts would give structures reinforcement. Still, I'm not sure I'd want to be in that area when a hurricane does hit. If I survive, I'd be shaken for a long time.


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I'll invoke the Fifth Amendment on that!
So will I! hehe.​
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>The stilts would give structures reinforcement.<<

To a point, but that's not the real objective. The idea is to keep the habitable portion of the home dry. Typically, the part at ground level is walled in and used as a garage or basement to store things in. This is the part which gets washed away, but nobody minds because it was expendable in the first place.

At least you...hypothetically...have a home to return to.
 
May 3, 2005
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>>especially those sailors seeking, er, companionship for a night or two. ;) <<

>>I'll invoke the Fifth Amendment on that!<<

This is all hearsay evidence, which of course is not admissible in any Court of Law, much less in any Court of Inquiry, but from what I have heard from some sailors it was something to do with "Cigareets and whiskey and wild, wild women."
 
Jun 12, 2004
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The idea is to keep the habitable portion of the home dry.
It still sounds like a stretch in a hurricane, where anything and everything is bound to get smacked around. Of course, you didn't say that it would be an easy process, only that that was the idea intended.

And to think: The BMW you park in your garage on any given day quite literally might get washed away the next day.​
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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quote:

I would be curious about that in which the seafarers of 1912 commonly engaged while in port.
The Titanic's deck officers enjoyed a variety of activities - James Moody, for example, did everything from rollerskate to exploring mine shafts in Valparaiso. Harold Lowe enjoyed fishing very much (one reason he loved New Zealand). All of them liked to socialise - they attended social functions. They had friends in many different parts of the world, and would visit them when in port. Many did enjoy a drink (there's a photo of several Oceanic officers, including Lightoller and Boxhall, in port with pints in front of them). Moody also refers to looking forward to sharing birthday celebrations with two colleagues, as the dates fell next to each other. They went sightseeing - there are many postcards still extant from Moody and Boxhall showing the sights in the cities they visited. Several were keen photographers - Lowe's albums are full of photographs he took of the places he visited, and I had a very enjoyable time recently with his family and some Museum staff identifying Sydney and Melbourne landmarks and locations he photographed. They attended shows - and Moody's correspondence refers to seeing films in NY.​
 
Jun 12, 2004
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Thank you, Inger. Needless to say that all of these officers were deeply (religiously?) into families, friends and cultural experiences. I presume that they all knew one another personally before Titanic (obviously those relationships involving Moody, Wilde and Murdoch were pre-sinking)? Did any of these men ever serve together on ships other than the Olympic? And did the surviving officers continue their associations after the Titanic incident?
I'd be interested in knowing how the sinking affected their post-Titanic relationships.
 

Inger Sheil

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Not all of them knew each other, Mark...I'd have to trace through the map of interpersonal relationships and look up my notes, but it goes roughly like this.

Wilde knew Blair (he'd served with him prior to their assignment to the Titanic, Murdoch, Lightoller (?) - that I can confirm.
Murdoch knew Wilde and Blair that I can confirm
Lightoller knew Boxhall, Pitman, Moody, Murdoch, Wilde (? need to check my recollection) and Blair.
Pitman knew Lightoller and Moody (that I can confident about).
Boxhall knew only Lightoller.
Moody knew Lightoller and Pitman. He had heard good reports of Murdoch. He did not, contrary to what Marcus thought, know Blair prior to their Titanic assignment as far as I can ascertain.
Lowe knew none of his Titanic colleagues prior to sailing.

Following the sinking, Lowe seems to have had little contact with his colleagues. Boxhall and Lightoller remained friendly. Pitman did meet Boxhall on at least one later occasion - I have no data on his continued relationship with Lightoller.
 
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Hi Inger,

As you know I wondered how Lowe got on with his colleagues. Lowe seems to me to be a lone wolf. Not that he didn't like the other Officers so much as he seemed to prefer to think on his own and go his own way. Lowe was also a Teetotaller if I'm right. I wonder what effect that had on his relationships with his fellow officers. All I can say is I'm waiting for the book on Lowe to come out, Inger.
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Jun 12, 2004
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So am I! ;) If I remember rightly (and, Inger, you can correct me if I'm wrong. I am going by what I've read), Lowe committed suicide by shooting in 1944 upon hearing of his son's death in the war.
 
Jun 12, 2004
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Um, Mike, I read the end where it says he died, but it doesn't say anything about his having died from hypertension; it only gives the date. Besides, if he did die from hypertension, what caused it?
 

Inger Sheil

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That "other" Lowe is one of those strange claimants to the name - rather like the Pitman and Lightoller who happened to share nothing more than a name.

Harold Godfrey Lowe did indeed die on May 12, 1944 of hypertension compounded by Malaria. He had been in poor health for some years, and had already suffered a stroke that left him in a wheelchair ("bathchair" as it was known at the time). Sadly, this seems to have been a genetic legacy of his mother's branch of the family - I've found several close relatives on the Quick side who died of a stroke, no doubt caused by hypertension, at almost precisely the same age.

Harold had only one (known!) son, Harold William George Lowe, who did serve with distinction in WWII. He only passed away in 1999. He was a friend, who was highly supportive of the work on the biography - his input was invaluable.
 
Jun 12, 2004
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Mike-

I didn't notice that. Thanks.

Inger-

Where did the story come about in which Lowe committed suicide? This I found in at least two books. Was it misinterpretation on the writers' parts? Legend?

Or is it that I have this story mismatched with the wrong person?
 

Inger Sheil

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You might be compounding a couple of stories, Mark. Fred Fleet committed suuicide in 1965 following his wife's death and his eviction. He hanged himself. Jack Thayer committed suicide (using razors) in his car after the loss of his son during WWII.
 
Jun 12, 2004
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No, I wasn't compounding stories--Jack Thayer was the one about whom I was thinking.

I remember, too, Fred Fleet and his suicide by hanging in 1965. His body, if I remember rightly, was found in someone's back yard.

I need to brush up on my reading. It has been a while. But when time permits.

In any case, thank you!

Now, back to the topic of the thread . . . .
 

John Clifford

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Mar 30, 1997
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quote:

back to the topic of the thread . . . .
I think we've been discussing places to recommend to James Cameron, for his next home (no, I don't know how many he owns, or can own).

I can attest that the one reason I don't mind living in Southern California is the mild weather in the winter, and I have become used to the hot temperatures in late spring and summer: name a month and I can remember a year when we had warm-to-hot days in that month. Yes, many of us get used to wearing shorts most of the time.
Yes, we have two- to three-times more people here, and not enough roads.

I wouldn't mind moving to warm area desert communities, except Las Vegas (too phony),.
One of my cousins has a condo in Myrtle Beach, so I would like to visit there, and could live in that area, although I know there are alligators in the Carolinas, too.
Yes, that is the consequence of the "we can build homes anywhere there is land" mentality: move close to the swamps and marshes, and you can expect to see gators in the yard, while if you build homes in hillsides, the fire danger is always present.

BTW, to Michael and Traci, I do hope that it will be quite a while before the likes of "Hugo", "Fran", and "Isabel" make return visits.​
 

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