Can anyone suggest some great Titanic books

  • Thread starter Ronan Martin McCoy
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Ronan Martin McCoy

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Does anyone know of any Titanic books(Especially those concerning Irish passengers)?
Thanks,
Ronan McCoy
 

Smith Mize

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Dec 20, 2002
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Yeah. I think the best one I've read was Titanic An Illustrated History by Don Lynch (text) and Ken Marschall (paintings). The introduction is by Robert Ballard, and after reading the entire book, I think that it's one of the best parts. Also, if you're looking for a book that's cheaper, you can buy Titanic by Leo Marriott. Titanic An Illustrated History is truthfully worth the pay, around $30 (American money). Titanic was on sale for $5 when I bought it, but you should expect to spend around $15 if its not. There are plenty more that I fail to name, but I've been outta here for a while, need to catch up!

- Smith [email protected]
 

George Behe

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Dec 11, 1999
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Hi, Ronan!

At the moment the only book on the Irish passengers is Senan Molony's "The Irish Aboard Titanic." However, you'll definitely want to keep your eyes peeled for the day when Phil Gowan and Brian Meister publish their own magnum opus on the Titanic's passengers and crew; that much-anticipated work will supersede all previous efforts by other writers.

All my best,

George
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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a very fine book that is not easy to find is Titanic: The Full Story of a Tragedy by Michael Davie. It contains much good material on some of the people involved and on the British inquiry. It deserves to be much better known.
 
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I finally got to read Senan's book on Titanic's Irish and was very impressed. George is right of course about the book Phil and Brian are doing; Phil has made a particular study of the Irish passengers. For an excellent biography of the most famous Irish-American passenger, read "Molly Brown: Unraveling the Myth" by Kristen Iversen.
 

Inger Sheil

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Feb 9, 1999
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Ronan, I can recommend Sen's book without reservation - it's an invaluable title, and one of the best ever released in this field both on the points of original research and literary style. There are a few threads about it in the book section - here's the earliest:

https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/cgi-bin/discus/show.cgi?tpc=5671&post=2323#POST2323

Another Irish title is Belfast's Own, by Stephen Cameron - this is also a very well researched title on Irish links (in this case, the Belfast story about the ship, its builders, and local crew and passengers). The two books can almost be read as companion titles, and complement each other very well. Like Molony, Cameron has demonstrated what excellent fresh material is out there for author/historians to explore.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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When Ronan asked this same question in his McCoys thread before repeating it here, ANTR was in fact the first book mentioned in response. But Walter remains the guv'nor so he deserves to come up again!
 

Inger Sheil

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Lol! Now now, Stuart...you know I'll stay out of touchy sectarian and socio/political issues...! Well, maybe just a dabble. IMHO, it is certainly an Irish book, although perhaps might not be considered as such not by some more hardline nationalist or unionist definitions. Unionists might consider themselves British, but while they prefer to be part of the Union they're still Anglo-Irish. Senan Molony himself has referred people to the 'Belfasts Own' text to give people a more complete idea of the Irish situation as it pertains to the Titanic - 1912 was, after all, well before the formation of the Irish Free State, although dominant nationalist or loyalist sympathies were already clearly identifiable in some geographic regions (e.g. that particular North-East corner that would one day become Northern Ireland). Many of those characters who surface in Cameron's book would have considered themselves Irish as well as loyal British subjects, and would have seen no contradiction. I've mentioned before that I find it intriguing that Pirrie, certainly one of the Ulster establishment, was pro-Home Rule (didn't stop those ugly sectarian incidents that erupted later in 1912 in the Harland & Wolff yards, though).
 
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Geoff Tibballs - Titanic
Eaton & Haas - Triumph & Tragedy
Eaton & Haas - Destination Disaster
Dr. Ballard - Discovery of the Titanic
James Cameron - Ghosts of the Abyss

And if you want a good laugh...

Gardiner & Van Der Vat - The Riddle of the Titanic
 
Sep 5, 2005
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Now that we're getting down to the nitty gritty in Xmas shopping and perhaps just an excuse to pick up something for myself, what do you think are the best Titanic books, probably with emphasis on passengers/Edwardian period, aside from Walter Lord's books? I'd even appreciate nominations on the hard-to-find, as I have some birthdays coming up in the next few months. Thanks.
 

Henry Loscher

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Mar 6, 2003
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I have a special place for one of the most interesting persons connected with the disaster. Charles H. Lightoller certainly led a most interesting life. His story is vividly told in the book "Titanic Vovayger - The Odyssey of C.H. Lightoller: by Patrick Stenson. I enjoyed it very much and think you will as well.

Regards, Henry Loscher
 

Ernie Luck

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Nov 24, 2004
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I have an arrangement with our local second-hand book shop that they telephone me if they get any Titanic books in. last week they telephoned "we have two Titanic books and a magazine"'.

The books were 'Titanic voices', 'Titanic, the illustrated history' and the magazine was the 1972 anniversary edition of 'Titanic; the deathless story'. The shop does not pay much or charge much, I bought the last two for £6 & £1. Ballard's books turn up quite frequently.
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

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I didn't know where to post this, but I'm looking forward to have "Titanic: An Illustrated History" and I'm having a bit of problems to buy it. I thought someone could send me a copy, if it's possible. Forgive my ignorance and if it's really a stupid request you don't even need to answer. You just can't imagine how difficult it is to pursue those books here and I've heard so good commentaries and references about this book that I decided to ask someone. Really, if you don't answer I understand.

Best regards, João
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Joao, most of us do our book-buying online and we can do that from any PC at any location - here in the UK, in Portugal, somewhere in the Amazon jungle, no problem. Online dealers like Amazon.co.uk will be happy to serve you and to deliver anywhere. They have two second-hand copies of Illustrated History on offer right now for the very low price of under three pounds. Even with carriage to pay, that's a bargain.
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

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Bob, I forgot to thank you for the suggestion. Forgive my ignorance, but how do I buy it? By e-mail? May I ask the book to be sent by Blue Post?
I normally go to the library when I buy a book but recently I prefer to use the online book-sellers. However, things in Portugal are quite different. Could you give me a bit of advice in this procedures?

Best regards, João
 

Bob Godfrey

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Jim Mueller

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I am a new reader to the Titanic, although my fascination has been for decades. I am looking for a good Titanic book. I have been reading the posts here and getting good info. I was going to buy "A night to remember" but it starts with the Titanic already approaching the ice field...I want to read more on the construction and the elegance of the Titanic too. I guess I want the whole story. I thought about buying "Unsinkable" but I have read from the folks here that it is not a very popular or accurate book.

Any help is GREATLY APPRECIATED !!

Thank you.
 

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