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I can well understand the confusion of non-seafarers with the sketches such the one posted by Steven (and me - I have to say). Such sketched are based on the assumption that the viewer has a basic knowledge.
In fact, some of the labels in Steven's sketch are directions relative to a part of a ship, some are positions relative to a part of a ship and others are actual parts of a ship. The word ship itself is a misnomer. Here's a wee sketch that might help. I don't have the originalView attachment 74475 Hope this helps Kareen (or is it Lili?) ;)
Yes thats much better Jim. Thanks. I was familar with every term on your diagram but the shoulder. I just don't ever recall hearing that term. I was never a ship driver but to you all that's probably a common term. But I'm going to cut myself some slack because my search engine didn't know what it was eithier. When I typed in "port shoulder" this came up...:p
.jpg
 
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If moderators are becoming not very happy about the topic, you could reassure them and invite them for the supper : a recipe of marinated pork 108 years of age, in a sauce made of salted water, heavy metals, hydrocarbons, and all you can think about ! lol!:D

They would have to settle for BLT's and beer.
Lili-marlene..as in the WW1 & WW2 song?
I'm glad you found Jim's diagram useful. I did. And learned something new. But I'm not sure if that applies to all ships...the "shoulder" I mean.
 

Jim Currie

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They would have to settle for BLT's and beer.
Lili-marlene..as in the WW1 & WW2 song?
I'm glad you found Jim's diagram useful. I did. And learned something new. But I'm not sure if that applies to all ships...the "shoulder" I mean.
You are correct, Steven, the word "shoulder" was a simile used at sea when I was a lad. I don't think you will find that description in a Ship Building Manual. Well spotted.

PS Having lived through WW2 I remember it very well.;)
 
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You are correct, Steven, the word "shoulder" was a simile used at sea when I was a lad. I don't think you will find that description in a Ship Building Manual. Well spotted.

PS Having lived through WW2 I remember it very well.;)
Thanks for the reply. Yes a lot of the older terms for many industries are not used anymore. I've been reading thru some of the old International Marine Engineering papers from the turn of the 19th/20th century. Lots of stuff I've never heard of before but am impressed on the technical knowledge they had back then. Especially since they did it all on paper and manual calculations.
 

Jim Currie

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Thanks for the reply. Yes a lot of the older terms for many industries are not used anymore. I've been reading thru some of the old International Marine Engineering papers from the turn of the 19th/20th century. Lots of stuff I've never heard of before but am impressed on the technical knowledge they had back then. Especially since they did it all on paper and manual calculations.
Hi Steven,
It might surprise you to learn that I do not use my computer when re working navigation problems concerning the Titanic story. I still have my 70-year-old tables and use them, the same formulae and paper in in exactly the same way as did Smith, his officers and the officers of all the ships involved in the Titanic saga.
 
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Hi Steven,
It might surprise you to learn that I do not use my computer when re working navigation problems concerning the Titanic story. I still have my 70-year-old tables and use them, the same formulae and paper in in exactly the same way as did Smith, his officers and the officers of all the ships involved in the Titanic saga.
Its good that you can keep those skills alive. I understand in a way what your saying. I often have to use the older ways of doing things when I restore older machines. Old manuals and procedures and in some cases making/modifing tools you can't find anymore. But the one thing the computer is good for is tracking down parts. I don't think I could have completed my last project without it. Just curious...do you ever break out your old sextant and take a sighting?
 

Jim Currie

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NewtonMearns, Glasgow, Scotland.
Its good that you can keep those skills alive. I understand in a way what your saying. I often have to use the older ways of doing things when I restore older machines. Old manuals and procedures and in some cases making/modifing tools you can't find anymore. But the one thing the computer is good for is tracking down parts. I don't think I could have completed my last project without it. Just curious...do you ever break out your old sextant and take a sighting?
Nope! Had 2 of them and they were very old. All my work after 1974 was done witn GPS, Stoped even using that 16 years ago :D :D :D:D
 
They would have to settle for BLT's and beer.
Lili-marlene..as in the WW1 & WW2 song?
I'm glad you found Jim's diagram useful. I did. And learned something new. But I'm not sure if that applies to all ships...the "shoulder" I mean.
Yes that's for the song and obviously my other History's hobby along with TITANIC : the Second World War. I'm trained as a Historian and History is a part of me. I risk myself to answer your question : a friend of mine, who is a former Captain and who had been Master of many wooden built Schooners with steam Engines (That's him who built 3 wooden's TITANIC : one of 4 feet long ; one of 9 feet and a last one of 12 feet -- and he is teaching me how to do it) and he told me that he did used those terms like "shoulder" etc. In French he used "épaule" for Shoulder ; "hanche" which has no equivalent in English because that would be "hip" but I never heard about "hip" in Ship's orientation. Take Care !

PS to all : is someone could be able to provide me an Article titled something like "Your Answer does not please me". It is an Article about Lord Mersey, and I would like to read it so much ! The title here is not exactly the same, but it looks like it at 90%, therefore one could easily recognize it in spite of the fact that is not literally the good one. Thanks !
 
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Yes that's for the song and obviously my other History's hobby along with TITANIC : the Second World War. I'm trained as a Historian and History is a part of me. I risk myself to answer your question : a friend of mine, who is a former Captain and who had been Master of many wooden built Schooners with steam Engines (That's him who built 3 wooden's TITANIC : one of 4 feet long ; one of 9 feet and a last one of 12 feet -- and he is teaching me how to do it) and he told me that he did used those terms like "shoulder" etc. In French he used "épaule" for Shoulder ; "hanche" which has no equivalent in English because that would be "hip" but I never heard about "hip" in Ship's orientation. Take Care !

PS to all : is someone could be able to provide me an Article titled something like "Your Answer does not please me". It is an Article about Lord Mersey, and I would like to read it so much ! The title here is not exactly the same, but it looks like it at 90%, therefore one could easily recognize it in spite of the fact that is not literally the good one. Thanks !
I'm don't know of an article about that but Mr. Currie might be able to help you as he mentioned that in the post below. I'm guessing that might be from the british inquiry but that would only be a guess on my part. As in he might have made that statement outside of the inquiry.
see post 2163
 

Jim Currie

Member
Apr 16, 2008
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NewtonMearns, Glasgow, Scotland.
Yes that's for the song and obviously my other History's hobby along with TITANIC : the Second World War. I'm trained as a Historian and History is a part of me. I risk myself to answer your question : a friend of mine, who is a former Captain and who had been Master of many wooden built Schooners with steam Engines (That's him who built 3 wooden's TITANIC : one of 4 feet long ; one of 9 feet and a last one of 12 feet -- and he is teaching me how to do it) and he told me that he did used those terms like "shoulder" etc. In French he used "épaule" for Shoulder ; "hanche" which has no equivalent in English because that would be "hip" but I never heard about "hip" in Ship's orientation. Take Care !

PS to all : is someone could be able to provide me an Article titled something like "Your Answer does not please me". It is an Article about Lord Mersey, and I would like to read it so much ! The title here is not exactly the same, but it looks like it at 90%, therefore one could easily recognize it in spite of the fact that is not literally the good one. Thanks !
Some information for you Kareen;
"

haunch​

(hônch, hŏnch)
n.
1. The hip, buttock, and upper thigh in humans and certain other animals.
2. The loin and leg of a four-footed animal, especially as used for food: a haunch of venison.
3. Architecture Either of the sides of an arch, curving down from the apex to an impost.

[Middle English haunche, from Old French hanche, from Frankish *hanka.]"
As for " Buttock"? That is used in Naval Architecture as follows:
"Buttock line Line depicted on a lines plan showing the intersection of the hull moulded surface with a vertical plane parallel to the centreline."

Stay safe
 
LOL ! Thank you Jim. :D Yes I knew about those words and their meaning, for I am making ship models, but maybe I was not clear in what I said to Steven. To get things clear, what I wanted to say is that I don't know if in English you use the word "hip starboard" or "hip to port" to designate the mid-ship to port and mid-ship to starboard, because in French a seaman do use the word "hanche tribord" and "hanche bâbord" for speaking about something that would be in his mid-ship. I hope to have been clearer this time;)
 

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