Captain Rostron


Arun Vajpey

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You have adroitly side stepped my response that it must have been obvious Titanic had sunk to debunk your own view.
Our friend side-stepping the point under discussion? Not really for the first time, is it Julian?
What we don't know for sure is why Cottam didn't send any wireless messages from approximately 3.15am to 8.30am on the 15th April.
I can think of 3 possibilities but accept that none of them might be true. Please remember that it is conjecture only before telling me off.
  1. You mentioned that the wireless set on the Carpathia was an older model. Cottam had been using it a lot earlier that night. Knowing that once the survivors were on board the set would be overworked, might he have been servicing it in readiness?
  2. Again, knowing that Cottam would be working had sending out both official and private messages once the survivors were on board, Rostron might have allowed Cottam - or even instructed him - to take a break when he could.
  3. Considering the amount of work involved to prepare the Carpathia to receive over 700 survivors and then the actual tasks of helping them as they came aboard, every available pair of hands would have been required. Maybe that included Cottam.
 

Jim Currie

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Hi Jim,

Of Cottam waiting up for a reply from the Parisian, we don't know what message Cottam sent to Sutherland and when, but as Sutherland had 'done an Evans' and retired early and closed his set down, and no PV recording this, I think it is reasonable to assume the message sent by Cottam to Sutherland took place much earlier than you suggest. I can't myself think what it was that Cottam wanted off Sutherland on the Parisian that caused him to stay up waiting for a reply. (Cottam clearly wasn't waiting for a reply to a MSG status message to the Parisian).

Am I correct to assume Cottam changed his wavelength to listen to Cape Cod ? Then changed back to another wavelength to send the message to Titanic?

If so, and my ignorance of these things regarding wavelengths may become readily apparent, if Cottam was listening to Cape Cod, would he really be able to receive a reply from the Parisian and Sutherland?

Was it a plausible claim by Cottam? The Parisian hadn't communicated via wireless for some considerable time because Sutherland had turned in and gone to bed. Captain Hains had told him to do so apparently.
Hello Julian.

I will answer both of your posts here.

First, you credit me with a clever avoidance which I do not merit.
I did not respond to your assertion as to what Cottm guessed about the progress of the sinking simply because it bore no connection to the actions of Rostron, who we are discussing.
However, on that subject - If Durrant was listening and passed the intelligence to Rostron, then half an hour after he had turned Carpathia, Rostron knew Titanic was going down fast by the head and 20 minutes later; that they were putting people in boats. Yet we are told by Rostron
"At 2:40, I saw a flare, about half a point on the port bow, and immediately took it for granted that it was the Titanic itself, and I remarked that she must be still afloat,"
So if Cottam did his job, Rostron knew Titanic was sinking half an hour into his rescue mission but the latter tells us he took it for granted Titanic was still afloat an hour and a half later (more, if as Sam tells us - Rostron got his green flare sighting time wrong).
Does that answer your question?

As for your comparison between Lord's action in staying below that night? We are discussing "Chalk and cheese."
The examples you gave were the actions of Officers on the bridge of a ship that was underway. Lord did exactly the same thing and had not his ship been stopped for ice, would have remained on the bridge until he deemed it was safe for him to leave it.
If you look at the relevant part of the UK inquiry, you will find that Lord's interrogators made the same mistake. It is not necessary for the captain of a ship to remain on the bridge when his ship is stopped and not in danger. In fact, a moving ship, in clear visibility at night is in more potential danger than was the stopped Californian, yet the captain goes to bed at night on a moving ship. Do you understand?

If we are to believe the content of the running commentary in the wireless log of the Mount Temple, then Carpathia was off the air for 2 hours 50 minutes - from 10-35 pm EST until 1-25 am EST the next morning.
There was another huge gap between 2am EST until 6-45 am EST.
All-in-all, Cottam transmitted a total of 4 times in a period of 8 hours 10 minutes.. between 10-35 pm EST and 6-45 am EST.

When listening to Cape Cod, Cottam would tune -into the transmitting frequency of the sending station. Can't remember what that was. If a powerful, nearby station was transmitting on the same frequency, then its signal would jamb the distant station. If Cottam, as claimed, was listening to or for another station, then Titanic's very first cry for help would have blasted his ears.
Then there is his contradiction of taking down Titanic messages to pass on the next day, versus his telling Titanic that Cape Cod had messages for him. A liar has to have a good memory - Cottam was no so blessed.

Talking about true heroism, long hours, exhaustion and wireless, reminds me of the story of another WSL vessel, the RMS Republic, lost due to a collision in fog three years earlier. See https://www.earlyradiohistory.us/1909men.ht
 

Arun Vajpey

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The sort of picture of Rostron and his crew that is being painted above, the only thing that has not been claimed is that they stood on the decks of the Carpathia and burst into the Horst Wessel Song.
 
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By the way, if you want to be constructive and at the same time, taken seriously, Sam, I suggest you quote the evidence as given, and try to resist the temptation to lead with personal, unsupported opinion or, as in this case, a falsehood and sarcasm. Lord did not see any rockets and heard of only one when he was below.
OK, let me quote the evidence, which of course is somewhat inconsistent, depending on who you want to believe.
I said in my post #197 above: "Because he was informed that there was a ship firing rockets in the night."

From the evidence of 2/O Stone: "I, at once, whistled down the speaking tube and you came from the chartroom into your own room and answered. I reported seeing these lights in the sky in the direction of the other steamer which appeared to me to be white rockets. You then gave me orders to call her up with the Morse lamp and try and get some information from her. You also asked me if they were private signals and I replied, ‘I do not know but they were all white.’ You then said: ‘When you get an answer let me know by Gibson.’"

Try and get information from a ship throwing rockets that had not responded to your previous attempts at Morse signaling any time before? Really?

I also said, rather sarcastically, in my post #197 above: "But that was no reason to go topside to see for himself what was happening" even after Stone told him that he didn't know what they were except they appeared to be white rockets.

Clearly, Lord's 2nd officer was informing his captain about seeing rockets in the night and was, in Stone's own words, "I just took them as white rockets, and informed the master and left him to judge." But Lord decided to stay below rather than seeing for himself what was happening. Perhaps if Lord was told about only one rocket, as he had claimed, he could have said 'if you see any more, call me up immediately.'

In my post #197 I also said, yes, rather sarcastically, that: " Oh, I forgot, Capt. Smith didn't know the rules about how to fire distress signals, so it was Smith's fault that Stone didn't recognize them as such. Just white rockets showing stars, one at a time at intervals, in response to their failed Morsing attempts to warn Californian that there were big icebergs about."

Need I remind you Jim that it is you who has been trying to convince readers here that Titanic should have been firing their distress socket signals at intervals of about 1 minute because they could be used either as rockets throwing stars one at a time at short intervals, or a cannon making a loud report which were required to be fired at 1 minute intervals. And as for my remark about the rockets being used "to warn Californian that there were big icebergs about," I didn't make that up. Here from Stone's own mouth:

"I thought that perhaps the ship was in communication with some other ship, or possibly she was signaling to us to tell us she had big icebergs around her."
 
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Jim Currie

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OK, let me quote the evidence, which of course is somewhat inconsistent, depending on who you want to believe.
I said in my post #197 above: "Because he was informed that there was a ship firing rockets in the night."

From the evidence of 2/O Stone: "I, at once, whistled down the speaking tube and you came from the chartroom into your own room and answered. I reported seeing these lights in the sky in the direction of the other steamer which appeared to me to be white rockets. You then gave me orders to call her up with the Morse lamp and try and get some information from her. You also asked me if they were private signals and I replied, ‘I do not know but they were all white.’ You then said: ‘When you get an answer let me know by Gibson.’"

Try and get information from a ship throwing rockets that had not responded to your previous attempts at Morse signaling any time before? Really?

I also said, rather sarcastically, in my post #197 above: "But that was no reason to go topside to see for himself what was happening" even after Stone told him that he didn't know what they were except they appeared to be white rockets.

Clearly, Lord's 2nd officer was informing his captain about seeing rockets in the night and was, in Stone's own words, "I just took them as white rockets, and informed the master and left him to judge." But Lord decided to stay below rather than seeing for himself what was happening. Perhaps if Lord was told about only one rocket, as he had claimed, he could have said 'if you see any more, call me up immediately.'

In my post #197 I also said, yes, rather sarcastically, that: " Oh, I forgot, Capt. Smith didn't know the rules about how to fire distress signals, so it was Smith's fault that Stone didn't recognize them as such. Just white rockets showing stars, one at a time at intervals, in response to their failed Morsing attempts to warn Californian that there were big icebergs about."

Need I remind you Jim that it is you who has been trying to convince readers here that Titanic should have been firing their distress socket signals at intervals of about 1 minute because they could be used either as rockets throwing stars one at a time at short intervals, or a cannon making a loud report which were required to be fired at 1 minute intervals. And as for my remark about the rockets being used "to warn Californian that there were big icebergs about," I didn't make that up. Here from Stone's own mouth:

"I thought that perhaps the ship was in communication with some other ship, or possibly she was signaling to us to tell us she had big icebergs around her."
That is a heck of a lot of words to say very little, Sam I am perfectly aware of the reasons for your totally unconnected remarks. (and the mark of approval).
What's a flash and a few stars between friends?
Again I suggest -.why not constructively contribute?

Oops! I nearly forgot.
You wrote:
"it is you who has been trying to convince readers here that Titanic should have been firing their distress socket signals at intervals of about 1 minute because they could be used either as rockets throwing stars one at a time at short intervals, or a cannon making a loud report which were required to be fired at 1 minute intervals."

Nonsense! I don't have to convince readers of anything,,, they can read the Rules for themselves: You should try it yourself instead of interpreting:
From the UK Inquiry:
"Distress signals. - These were supplied of number and pattern approved by Board of Trade - i.e., 36 socket signals in lieu of guns, 12 ordinary rockets, 2 Manwell Holmes deck flares, 12 blue lights, and 6 lifebuoy lights."
And what do The Rules say about the guns these signals replace?
 
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Paul Burrell

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That is a heck of a lot of words to say very little, Sam I am perfectly aware of the reasons for your totally unconnected remarks. (and the mark of approval).
What's a flash and a few stars between friends?
Again I suggest -.why not constructively contribute?

Oops! I nearly forgot.
You wrote:
"it is you who has been trying to convince readers here that Titanic should have been firing their distress socket signals at intervals of about 1 minute because they could be used either as rockets throwing stars one at a time at short intervals, or a cannon making a loud report which were required to be fired at 1 minute intervals."

Nonsense! I don't have to convince readers of anything,,, they can read the Rules for themselves: You should try it yourself instead of interpreting:
From the UK Inquiry:
"Distress signals. - These were supplied of number and pattern approved by Board of Trade - i.e., 36 socket signals in lieu of guns, 12 ordinary rockets, 2 Manwell Holmes deck flares, 12 blue lights, and 6 lifebuoy lights."
And what do The Rules say about the guns these signals replace?
Hi Jim

I have been trying to formulate a question in my mind regarding this subject without repeating myself, which is difficult given this Merry-go-round keeps spinning. Albeit, I am enjoying the ride!

What we know for fact is that Titanic was sending up distress signals. I am willing to concede those distress signals were not precisely fired in line with the rules; you have evidenced this. However, the rules leave some element of interpretation - the regular intervals part - and Rowe, Boxhall and everyone else had lots of things to think about. Probably they thought the intervals were regular.

We surely must also agree that Stone and Gibson only saw Titanic’s rockets. Even if there was another ship (or ships) between Titanic and Californian, they were not firing rockets. Any suggestion that the ship firing rockets was sailing away is pure fiction, I think. We have been here before; you know my thoughts on this.

It is established that rockets at sea are rare.

So, would you be willing to put yourself metaphorically in Stone or Gibson’s shoes. What would you have thought the rockets were for? I assume, given your admirable defence of the Californian’s crew and their conduct, that you would think they were not distress signals. But, then what would you interpret them as?

On another thread recently you said - ref the rescue and Rostron’s radio silence; forgive me, I’ll have to paraphrase slightly - that Lord would have effected a rescue if he had news of Titanic sinking because he would have realised that Stone and Gibson saw her rockets. Why? Stone and Gibson knew at the BI that Titanic had sunk but still maintained they had no idea what the rockets were for.
 

Arun Vajpey

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Gibson testified that Stone told him "A Ship is not going to fire rockets at night for nothing". I think that sentence sums up the situation.

It did not matter whether Stone, Gibson or anyone else thought that the rockets fired were white, coloured, shooting starts, company signals or whatever. When Captain Lord was informed of those rockets, irrespective of the number, he should have made the monumental effort of getting off his butt, going up on the deck and getting more details. This was especially the case when he had stopped his own ship in the middle of the ocean as a precaution against icebergs and knew that his own wireless operator had sent ice warnings to other ships. The fact that he was not in bed but just resting (presumably on a chair) in uniform would have made that task even simpler. It the rockets turned out to be harmless - no big deal; Stone would have gone back on watch, Lord back to the chart room and Evans back to bed. But the fact that Lord did not even do that simple task was a monumental failure of duty and responsibility and the fact that any action on his part would probably have made little difference is completely besides the point.

No person with a modicum of intelligence and retaining mental faculties in the right order would think it was not necessary for Lord to go up and check or wake his wireless operator after the duty officer or the apprentice reported seeing another ship firing (a) rocket or rockets.
 
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Jim Currie

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Hi Jim

I have been trying to formulate a question in my mind regarding this subject without repeating myself, which is difficult given this Merry-go-round keeps spinning. Albeit, I am enjoying the ride!

What we know for fact is that Titanic was sending up distress signals. I am willing to concede those distress signals were not precisely fired in line with the rules; you have evidenced this. However, the rules leave some element of interpretation - the regular intervals part - and Rowe, Boxhall and everyone else had lots of things to think about. Probably they thought the intervals were regular.

We surely must also agree that Stone and Gibson only saw Titanic’s rockets. Even if there was another ship (or ships) between Titanic and Californian, they were not firing rockets. Any suggestion that the ship firing rockets was sailing away is pure fiction, I think. We have been here before; you know my thoughts on this.

It is established that rockets at sea are rare.

So, would you be willing to put yourself metaphorically in Stone or Gibson’s shoes. What would you have thought the rockets were for? I assume, given your admirable defence of the Californian’s crew and their conduct, that you would think they were not distress signals. But, then what would you interpret them as?

On another thread recently you said - ref the rescue and Rostron’s radio silence; forgive me, I’ll have to paraphrase slightly - that Lord would have effected a rescue if he had news of Titanic sinking because he would have realised that Stone and Gibson saw her rockets. Why? Stone and Gibson knew at the BI that Titanic had sunk but still maintained they had no idea what the rockets were for.
Good morning, Paul. I trust this finds you well.

As I pointed out to Sam - this tread is about Rostron - not Lord et al. However, I will not be discourteous and ignore your question. First, though, concerning your remarks about Rostron.

If you read my post again, you will find that I was pointing out the fact that if Rostron had been an efficient navigator - knew where he was and kept other potential rescuers in the loop after he arrived at the scene of the disaster - then when Lord had Evans call CQ, he (Lord) would have put two and two together and been able to head in the direction in which the signals had been seen. Since there was relatively clear water between Californian and Carpathia, it is conceivable that Californian could have been on the scene quicker and without having to cross the ice barrier twice.

Now back to the beginning of your post.

The firing of distress signals are the prerogative of the Master and the Master, in this case, was, without question, one of the most experienced mariners of his time. As such, he would have been careful to ensure that a distress signal would be recognised as such.
If we believe popular timings, then Smith did not allow firing of his signals for over an hour after Titanic had hit the iceberg and for almost an hour after he knew his ship was in serious trouble. When he did allow them to be fired, he knew help was on the way and he already had a ship in sight -a potential rescuer - heading straight for Titanic. He was still continuously transmitting a wireless call for assistance. Consequently, all he had to do was to ensure that he had the undivided attention of the approaching vessel. . In addition, he used his signaling lights to ensure that if the approaching vessel did not have wireless, he could open communications with her.
In short - I think Smith deliberately did not use his signals as per the Rules but used them as a means of holding the attention of a vessel already in sight and getting nearer.

There is no doubt that Stone and Gibson saw Titanic's distress signals, but the crucial point is that they did not recognise them as such, and did not do so in particular because of the two reference points they were using i.e. the masthead light of the nearby vessel and the horizon beyond that vessel.
If the signals were from the nearby vessel and these were socket signals, then even if the observers were too far away to hear the sound of detonation, the starbursts would have been at least three times the height of the masthead light. In addition: the first clearly identified signal was described by Stone as "In fact, it appeared to come from a good distance beyond her."
The only way he could have had that feeling would have been with reference to his natural horizon - seen or not.

I would not have interpreted what Stone saw as anything. Signals were. and still are. designed to convey an unmistakable message. However, as can be seen, if they do not convey that message or conform to the expected, they simply confuse. Consequently, if I had been in Stone's sea-boots, I would have done exactly as he did and followed the standard instruction of all Naval College advisors which was "If in doubt, get the Old Man out".
 
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There is no doubt that Stone and Gibson saw Titanic's distress signals, but the crucial point is that they did not recognise them as such,
IMO, they didn't want to admit that they saw distress signals and did nothing more than inform Lord about it. Nowhere did anyone use the excuse that the intervals were not short enough. Nowhere. In fact:

8028. Do you mean to tell his Lordship that you did not know that the throwing up of “rockets or shells, throwing stars of any colour or description, fired one at a time at short intervals,” is the proper method for signaling distress at night? - Yes, that is the way it is always done as far as I know.
8029. And you knew that perfectly well on the night of the 14th of April? - Yes.
The Commissioner: And is not that exactly what was happening?
8030. (Mr. Scanlan.) You have heard my Lord put that question. That was what was happening? -
Yes.
8031. (The Commissioner.) The very thing was happening that you knew indicated distress? - If that steamer had stayed on the same bearing after showing these rockets -
8032. No, do not give a long answer of that kind. Is it not the fact that the very thing was happening which you had been taught indicated distress? - Yes.
8033. (Mr. Scanlan.) You knew it meant distress? - I knew that rockets shown at short intervals, one at a time, meant distress signals, yes.
8034. Do not speak generally. On that very night when you saw those rockets being sent up you knew, did you not, that those rockets were signals of distress? - No.
8035. (The Commissioner.) Now do think about what you are saying. You have just told me that what you saw from that steamer was exactly what you had been taught to understand were signals of distress. You told me so? - Yes.
8036. Well is it true? - It is true that similar lights are distress signals, yes.
8037. Then you had seen them from this steamer? - A steamer that is in distress does not steam away from you, my Lord.
8038. You saw these before this steamer steamed away from you? - I saw them at the same time the ship started to alter her bearings.

Steaming away and firing rockets at the same time. That was Stone's excuse for not calling them distress signals.

We've been down this road before.
 
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Oh, by the way. Just because a socket signal could be used as a gun or a rocket does not mean that they have to be used as both guns and rockets to signal distress at night. On Titanic they were being used as distress rockets, which can be seen at a much greater range than the sound that they produced. I also find your statement that Smith was not trying to convey distress by firing these signals the way they did, but was only trying to ensure that he had the undivided attention of the approaching vessel, as quite absurd. How was would this supposedly approaching vessel know that Titanic was in distress? Did her lights look somewhat queer? Did she appear to have a list? Certainly they were not in wireless contact and they were not responding to Morse signaling.
 

Jim Currie

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IMO, they didn't want to admit that they saw distress signals and did nothing more than inform Lord about it. Nowhere did anyone use the excuse that the intervals were not short enough. Nowhere. In fact:

8028. Do you mean to tell his Lordship that you did not know that the throwing up of “rockets or shells, throwing stars of any colour or description, fired one at a time at short intervals,” is the proper method for signaling distress at night? - Yes, that is the way it is always done as far as I know.
8029. And you knew that perfectly well on the night of the 14th of April? - Yes.
The Commissioner: And is not that exactly what was happening?
8030. (Mr. Scanlan.) You have heard my Lord put that question. That was what was happening? -
Yes.
8031. (The Commissioner.) The very thing was happening that you knew indicated distress? - If that steamer had stayed on the same bearing after showing these rockets -
8032. No, do not give a long answer of that kind. Is it not the fact that the very thing was happening which you had been taught indicated distress? - Yes.
8033. (Mr. Scanlan.) You knew it meant distress? - I knew that rockets shown at short intervals, one at a time, meant distress signals, yes.
8034. Do not speak generally. On that very night when you saw those rockets being sent up you knew, did you not, that those rockets were signals of distress? - No.
8035. (The Commissioner.) Now do think about what you are saying. You have just told me that what you saw from that steamer was exactly what you had been taught to understand were signals of distress. You told me so? - Yes.
8036. Well is it true? - It is true that similar lights are distress signals, yes.
8037. Then you had seen them from this steamer? - A steamer that is in distress does not steam away from you, my Lord.
8038. You saw these before this steamer steamed away from you? - I saw them at the same time the ship started to alter her bearings.

Steaming away and firing rockets at the same time. That was Stone's excuse for not calling them distress signals.

We've been down this road before.
Hello Sam.
You began the above with "IMO" - you should have added "for what it's worth" then I could have answered, "nothing as far as this thread is concerned".
However, your assumption that I would take the bait was correct - I have nothing better to do.
You quote a particular passage during the interrogation of Stone and completely ignore the level of competence of those asking the question :
"Mr. Butler Aspinall:
As I understand it, white lights are distress signals; company's lights are very often coloured.
The Commissioner:
Would distress signals be coloured?
Mr. Butler Aspinall:
I have not got the exact wording of the regulation in my mind.
The Attorney-General:
I do not think there is anything about that in the regulations."

Like all amateurs - the learned (?) friends above, had no idea what distress signal Rules were until they looked them up, On the other hand, Stone and men like him had - from the very beginning of his career - to learn these Rules verbatim as well as demonstrate an understanding of the reasoning behind them. All for the very simple reason that someday, his life might depend on such knowledge.
How on earth, could those asking these questions competently judge the answers given?
We most certainly have been "down that road" many times. However, where we get to, depends on the road map used. Most historians use "Google," the mariners in the Titanic tragedy depended on ability and training. IMO Rostron gets a 7/10. :cool:
 

Jim Currie

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Oh, by the way. Just because a socket signal could be used as a gun or a rocket does not mean that they have to be used as both guns and rockets to signal distress at night. On Titanic they were being used as distress rockets, which can be seen at a much greater range than the sound that they produced. I also find your statement that Smith was not trying to convey distress by firing these signals the way they did, but was only trying to ensure that he had the undivided attention of the approaching vessel, as quite absurd. How was would this supposedly approaching vessel know that Titanic was in distress? Did her lights look somewhat queer? Did she appear to have a list? Certainly they were not in wireless contact and they were not responding to Morse signaling.
Read the evidence properly - not selectively, Sam.
The Socket signals were supplies instead of (in lieu of) guns - no in lieu of flames from a burning tar barrel or continuous sounding of the whistle or any other signals of distress. Titanic had ordinary rockets as well as socket signals. These were to be fired at "short intervals".
You find the idea that Smith was using his socket signals in the way I believe (not state) absurd because you cannot visualise the situation - cannot accept that there was indeed a vessel approaching as described by Boxhall. All simply because it rubbishes the idea of Titanic turning northward and bringing Californian on her bow.
If I remember correctly, you even postulated that Rostron was firing socket signals the same as Titanic. How on earth do you know that?
 
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Not surprising at all. The road is just a very long, meandering loop that gets us nowhere new but keeps passing the same points of un-interest before getting back to to where we
started from.
Yes. As Mark pointed a while back not everybody uses the same platforms/devices and many don't seem to have the right hand column of "similar threads" in their systems. Exact same discussions took place 20 years ago. But that's not a bad thing because even though Titanic interest is not where it was there are still new people discovering it. But all is not lost as many of the younger people getting into Titanic and her story are using the tech of today to re-tell the story. As in many of the good graphic platforms they are using to illustrate what in the past we only could read about. Some of it though does need a better machine to take advantage of their work than I have. I can't even over-clock my system. It's like 2 generations behind now as far as RAM goes. Lots of clicks and stutters when looking at some of the stuff they have produced.
 
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Arun Vajpey

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Nice post Steven, but I think the "Road" that Sam (and so, yours truly) was referring to is a specific, well trodden, named country lane and not a general highway. If you get my drift.
(You may want to remove your 'like' for post #214 ;) ).

Otherwise I find the points being discussed in this thread most stimulating.
 
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Nice post Steven, but I think the "Road" that Sam (and so, yours truly) was referring to is a specific, well trodden, named country lane and not a general highway. If you get my drift.
(You may want to remove your 'like' for post #214 ;) ).

Otherwise I find the points being discussed in this thread most stimulating.
You could be right. Not the first and won't be the last time I misread the gist of a post. No the "like" is fine. There's lot's of country lanes here. But that's ok as someone pointed out there's always new members here and it's new to them. It's easy to forget when the years start piling up. Cheers.
P.S... In my previous post I said my machine was like 2 generations behind. I was wrong. It's like 4 gens behind. I didn't realize the gamer's which make a lot of these Titanic graphics are past DDR6 now. My RAM is still DDR2. A dinosaur machine now...:eek:
 
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