Carpathia's Interiors


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Matthew O'Brien

Guest
What is known about the Carpathia's interiors, particulary in reference to the first class areas? Does anyone know of any pictures out there online of the inside of this ship?

Thanks,

Matt
 
M

Mike G. Anderson

Guest
Matt,

The thing about Carpathia was that she was built not for luxury, but economy. Equipped with large refrigerated storage compartments for food, as well as second and third class areas, she had no first class! I imagine the fact that the ship was a dual-purpose friegter/liner might have driven away the 1st Class passengers, so Cunard simply nixed the idea of a premier class. Ironically, Carpathia was one of Cunard's biggest ships, a mere 1000 tons off the size of Saxonia! It's rather amusing such a large ship had no first class!

Getting back on subject, the interiors were nothing extremely special, owing to its two-class distinction. However, she was a well equipped ship for her time. 3rd class had a bar, sitting room for the ladies, smoking room, and a 325 person saloon. (This seems small considering it could hold 1500 3rd class passengers) 2nd class could only hold 200 passengers, so extra facilities were meager. However, it is said that they were tastefully appointed.

Hope that helped!
 

Dave Hudson

Member
Apr 15, 2011
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"...she had no first class!"

Actually she did. When completed in the spring of 1903, Carpathia was intended for Hungarian emigrant service between Fiume and New York. At this time, she only held 204 2nd class and 1,500 3rd class.

By 1905, however, it was determined that Carpathia would be better suited for the Mediterranean tourist service. At that time, the Mediterranean was viewed much like we think of the Caribbean today-a warm, touristy locale that primarily catered to retired American vacationers. Because of this, many smaller vessels were put on routes from the US east coast to Italy as well as round trip cruises within the Mediterranean. Tourists either took 2nd or 3rd class depending on how big their vacation budget was. 3rd was still limited to southern European immigrants.

When this change took place, her accommodation was altered to 100 1st class, 200 2nd class and 2,250 3rd class passengers.

David
 
M

Mike G. Anderson

Guest
David,

Thanks a lot for the correction! Sorry about posting the wrong information. Can I just ask a few questions? I would really appriciate that!

1.With the inclusion of a first class only an afterthought, what did they do for public rooms. (Saloons and lounges come to mind) Were first and second able to be integrated?

2. Where was first class? Promonade deck or in converted/added deckhouses? Was it once 2nd class space?

3."...it was determined that Carpathia would be better suited for the Mediterranean tourist service." Not to sound harsh, but I don't understand how Carpathia would be better suited for anything other than the Fiume-New York route. Carpathia seems perfect as a lucrative venture...she was rather large and rather efficient and allowed food to be shipped to overpopulated eastern Europe. With a constant stream of emmigrants, I would imagine using the Carpathia on an underexploited route would be a profitable venture. Did Cunard put another liner in its place?

Sorry about the error! Thanks in advance.
 
Oct 20, 2009
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wondering if anyone has seen any other interior photos specifically 1st class smoking room, kitchen.... like to see photos of these rooms my grandfather mentioned after being rescued
 

Mike Poirier

Member
Dec 31, 2004
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Hello Mr. Williams
If I recall correctly, Titanic Triumph and Tragedy by Jack Eaton and Charlie Haas has some nice interior shots of the Carpathia. Also, I remember John and Vera Gillespie's excellent- The Titanic Man also had some interior shots.
Mike
 
Oct 20, 2009
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Michael

Thank you. I do have the for first book you mentioned (packed away) but have never heard of the other one. Thanks but no need to call me Mr. in the future.
 
Apr 5, 2006
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Hi, I have been looking for interior photos of the Carpathia for years with no success. Could anyone tell me if there are any in existence?

Thanks!
Luke
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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There are a few in Eaton and Haas' Titanic: Triumph and Tragedy.

[Moderator's Note: This message and the one immediately above it have been moved from a separate thread to this pre-existing one. MAB]
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
Member
Dec 3, 2000
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Niagara Falls, Ontario
Hello Luke,

Due to copyright issues, photos such as those ones are not permitted to be posted here, unless permission is obtained from the copyright holder first. Otherwise, it could land in a court of law.

Perhaps someone can e-mail them to you though. I don't own the book currently, otherwise I would. The last resort is to purchase the book yourself.
 

RyleeLines

Member
Jun 12, 2015
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Hello Luke,

Due to copyright issues, photos such as those ones are not permitted to be posted here, unless permission is obtained from the copyright holder first. Otherwise, it could land in a court of law.

Perhaps someone can e-mail them to you though. I don't own the book currently, otherwise I would. The last resort is to purchase the book yourself.
Do they OWN the Carpathia?NO,it's then okay to upload them,because they aren't owned by the author.They aren't owned by anyone
 

JJAstorII

Member
Mar 14, 2017
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Los Angeles, CA
Are there any existing photos of the interior of the Carpathia? I like to get a mindseye of things when I read about it and wanted to see the dining saloon and women's writing room that the passengers of Titanic were put in once onboard. However, all efforts of mine to find even a single interior picture of the Carpathia have dug up nothing. Anyone have better luck?
 

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