Carpathia's passengers and crew


Will

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May 18, 1998
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hi Andrew..a potentially loaded question there.. if indeed you are speaking of the entire list.. which brings me to my question...does anyone know how many passengers were on the Carpathia that day ? ... what was the capacity of the ship ? thanks
According to the confidential list of the "North Atlantic Passenger Conference" which I am fortunate to have a set of from 1899-1967, CARPATHIA had on board 105 First, 30 Second and 294 Third Class when she departed NY Eastbound on the voyage in which she rescued Titanic survivors. The arrival of CARPATHIA back to NY with these survivors on April 18 is also noted with "ex-Titanic" passengers and crew listed as the following divided into classes: 201 First, 118 Second and 179 Third with 201 crew (total: 705) My guess is that these survivors were not actually considered to be first or second or third but were simply accounted for in whatever part of the ship they were put up in but there will always be some loose-end mysteries.
 

Will

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May 18, 1998
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Greetings! CARPATHIA's passenger accommodation was 204 in second and as many as 2200 in Third Class-Steerage. Now, depending on which route she was working that accommodation was alternately designated First, Second, Steerage (on the Mediterranean services) or Second, and Third/Steerage (on the New York-Liverpool (very occasionally Liverpool-Boston) That 2200 figure is actual! It is confirmed both by the North Atlantic Passenger Conference figures and "Marine Engineering International" from 1909 which states that CARPATHIA set a record for number of steerage carried to the Mediterranean ports. Her Third Class/Steerage was made up of collapsible cabins that could be reconfigured with some effort, as well as open berth space "tween decks." I believe when operating as a three-class vessel the moveable cabins were the Second Class but I can't prove that yet.
 

gehrandt

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Dec 19, 2020
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May Birkhead (Berkhead) - During WWI (1918 - 1921) my Great Aunt Rosalie O'Donnell was overseas with the Red Cross. All the family letters of that time were saved and I have them in a book, "The World After WWI". In 1921 Celeste O'Donnell wrote the following about May Berkhead (sic) and I thought it might be of interest as May took pictures in the early morning of the rescue:
Mr. Compton, president of the Compton Lithographing Company here, a very charming and interesting man, who has been quite interested in hearing accounts of your movements, was telling me about a friend of his who has had a most spectacular and romantic career. Personally, he said, she is a very charming girl or woman but her early life and environment would never presuppose her interesting career the last ten years or so. She lived in Louisiana, Missouri, and very occasionally he said visited the “great metropolis of St. Louis meeting 'such celebrities' as for instance my self” their families having been friends. Of course, down in Missouri – in Pike County – her Father and Champ Clark, beloved of Missourians – knew each other, and as they did General Pershing, but long before he was a general. She went to New York to work and in some way saved enough money to make a trip to Europe, sailing on the Carpathia – which was the ship that rescued the survivors of the Titanic. When that terrible disaster was flashed over the world, a reporter on the New York Herald remembering that she sailed on it, went to his editor and told him that a girl friend of his was a passenger on the Carpathia and he felt she was capable of giving them a graphic account of the sinking of the Titanic and the rescue – so the editor immediately sent her a wireless, asking that she give them in her own words an account of the disaster, she to name her own price for the story, and when the Carpathia reached port with the survivors representatives of the Herald were on hand to get her story. As it happened, she had arisen long before the other passengers and saw practically everything and was fortunate enough to have a kodak, making some very remarkable pictures. She then went to Paris and became the fashion editor for the Herald, being sent to Monte Carlo, Riviera and other fashionable pleasure resorts of Europe with carte blanche orders to dress and spend lavishly. After that the war and when Pershing heard she was in Paris, on one of his trips to this country he brought her mother and her back with him, on a special trip, with, I presume, all the courtesies and attentions that would be extended to him. She is now in New York, as a sort of “advance agent” for the Queen of Roumania, whom you no doubt had heard plans to make a visit to this country I think this year, and this girl is sort of “feeling out the sentiment”, for it seems that the Queen of Roumania did not think President Wilson was overly friendly to the Roumanians for grabbing territory of the Austrian Empire and the Roumanians are not so sure of the incoming administration's attitude, as they are not sure of the influence Hoover will have on Harding – and as Hoover will be in the cabinet, he probably will have some influence. It seems the story goes that Hoover offered to feed the Roumanian children provided the Rumanians would make some oil concessions in exchange and they refused to give up their oil lands, so the American Relief Administration evidently did not work in Roumania. Those who don't like Hoover will believe that – while those who know the splendid work that he carried on so successfully will discredit the story. I meant to mail you a clipping from the Globe, telling of the reported “engagement of Prince Carol of Roumania and (I think) a Greek princess” from which I assume that poor Zizi has been thrown in the discard. Wonder if you have ever heard of this American girl in Paris – her name is Mayda Berkhead [May Birkhead] – and as Mr. Compton says, Louisiana, in Pike County, Missouri, will just be a memory to her of the place where she was born, pleasant to think of but to live in again, oh! never, and he wonders if that will be the case with you

Chitwood, Julie. The World After WW1 (pp. 594-595). Cinc. Kindle Edition.
 

Seabird22

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Mar 7, 2021
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My great grandfather: Camiel Bernard Van Cauter (1883-1943) was a passenger on the RMS Carpathia and helped to rescue survivors. Could anyone add him to the passengers list ?
Thx in advance.
 
Mar 1, 2021
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Hi does anybody know when any of the Carpathia's passengers and crew died and who they were?

Thanks

Andrew
Hi! I'm looking for a passenger list from the Carpathia on the night they rescued the Titanic survivors. Especially third class. If you come across anyone with a baby, I'd appreciate knowing the name. They were an ancestor of mine.
 

CJH

Member
May 19, 2021
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Michigan
I am also looking to find out if there is anyone (other than my grandfather) who was on the Carpathia the night the Titanic sank. He was a young boy at the time and he will be 99 in July of this year. Is there a list of survivors from the Carpathia anywhere?? thanks! Barb View attachment 4070

My father was a nine month old and on the Carpathia that night with his parents John and Anna Hubert. He was born in July 1911. His name was John Hubert and passed away in 1977. Perhaps he and your grandfather met onboard!
Chris Hubert
 
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