Carpathia's position and calculated course to rescue survivors


Doug Criner

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Dec 2, 2009
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Slight digression. U.S. Navy ships must show in their log some of the same daily information itemized by Sam. However, in accordance with time-honored tradition, the complete log entry, including all the required information, for midnight December 31 must be in rhyme. Ship's try to be imaginative and possibly humorous in that night's official log entry. Many traditions in the U.S. Navy were adopted from the Royal Navy - I'm not sure about this one.

Carry on.
 

Seumas

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Mar 25, 2019
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Slight digression. U.S. Navy ships must show in their log some of the same daily information itemized by Sam. However, in accordance with time-honored tradition, the complete log entry, including all the required information, for midnight December 31 must be in rhyme. Ship's try to be imaginative and possibly humorous in that night's official log entry. Many traditions in the U.S. Navy were adopted from the Royal Navy - I'm not sure about this one.

Carry on.
So at some point in their careers Halsey, Nimitz and Spruance would have done that ? :D
 

Doug Criner

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Dec 2, 2009
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"So at some point in their careers Halsey, Nimitz and Spruance would have done that?"

They would all have been very aware of the tradition and have been very interested in the doggerel that their ship's New Year's midwatch came up with. I think the responsibility for the rhyme was with the OOD - but they could call in the help of an amateur poet among the crew. For examples, Google: "U.S. Navy January 1 logs in verse," or something like that.

The rhymes often lament the poet's being stuck on the midwatch while his/her shipmates were on the beach celebrating New Years.

Since my original post, I've learned that the tradition is unknown in the Royal Navy, so it must be American.
 
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