Carpets


May 8, 2001
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I was wondering if there was carpet in the 3rd class. I don't believe that I have ever come across it mentioned.
Thanks in advance. Colleen
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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There was not a lot of carpet anywhere. Even the first class dining room was tiled. Carpet has a dire drawback at sea, as it is likely to be covered in food, not all of it spilled from plates!

"We're off to Nantucket
So hand that man a bucket,
It's choppy when you're out on the foam!"
 

Spencer Knarr

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Jun 16, 2004
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^^ Ok, it's obvious I can't spell tonight. The title of this thread should read: "Titanic HAD lazy CARPET layers."

After carefully inspecting several high resolution scans of the H&W photographs of various first class suites, I've come to the conclusion that the carpet layers were downright lazy! I submit the following as evidence:

Suite B38
120769.jpg


Suite B57
120770.jpg


Suite B64
120771.jpg


Ripples, bunching, folds...was this common in 1912? Did the technology for stretching a carpet not exist?

[Moderator's Note: The title of this thread has now been corrected. MAB]
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
I don't know if this was common practice or not, but since these photos were probably taken when the ship was fitting out, what you see may not be what it looked like when they got done.

On the other hand, I can recall seeing some photos of Olympic's smoking room and library which were apparantly taken in New York and the carpet did have some rumples in it.
 

Spencer Knarr

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Jun 16, 2004
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So these would have been mock photographs more than anything else? I'm imagining the second the photographer was done, workmen were back in the room moving all the furniture back out so they could finish the carpets.
 
Sep 28, 2002
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No I wouldn't use the word "mock", just to let the Shipping Line know how far they had come with the ship. Harland & Wolff took 2,500 photos of Titanic.
The workmen would be waiting until the photographer was finish and the Foreman would be nervous about getting everything finished.
 

Bill West

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Dec 14, 2005
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“Did the technology for stretching a carpet not exist?”
In a manner, no. More particularly it was vacuum cleaning that was not that universal and so carpets were not stretched to those nail strips we see at the edges of today’s wall to wall carpets. Instead the carpets were hemmed and just laid out, perhaps with eyelets and low brass pegs to hold the corners in traffic areas. That way the carpet could easily be removed to the outdoors for regular beatings. In 1910 railroads I have seen this in sleeping cars and I have seen “beating sheds” provided at terminals.

After the installation had been completed (as the others have pointed out) it would be the cabin steward who would straighten the carpet and tidy the fit in the corners. My impression from a period railroad car outfitted this way was that the carpets would not stay neatly in place without attention every few days, it was a labour intensive era.

Bill
 
May 3, 2005
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There is a new thread started on How Were The Carpets Cleaned On The Titanic .?
Did they have electric vacuum cleaners ?
Were they cleaned regularly when the ship was at sea or just in-between times after all passengers had disembarked and before passengers began embarking ?

I visited RMS Queen Mary in port in New York in 1965.
It was surprising to note they were using Hoover vacuum cleaners which looked very much like those of the mid 1930's vintage.
 
May 3, 2005
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See the thread on 'Titanic Had Lazy Carpet Layers'.

Moderator's note: The thread referred to is now this one. MAB
 
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