Catholic Service in 2nd Class


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Daniel Odysseus

Guest
I've wondered this... If there were no first class Catholic services, could the first class Catholics go to second class for the service there? I assumed that they could; wasn't the mixing of 1st and 2nd class not as "scandalous" as 1st and 3rd?
 
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Marykate Viola

Guest
I know that there was a Catholic priest on board in second class so maybe he lead Mass or something??? But then where would he get Communion host? I don't know.
 

Bill Sauder

Member
Dec 19, 2000
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Daniel:

First class Catholic passengers would have attended Mass in Second class without a problem. What kept Third class out was the immigration laws of the time. As long as Third class was kept separate, ONLY Third class had to undergo rigorous heath screening. If Third class were allowed to mingle, then EVERYBODY had to be examined for body lice, insanity, etc.

Marykate:

The most reasonable speculation is that the Catholic priests brought their own communion hosts, since they knew they were traveling and would probably be offering Mass on each day of the voyage. Communion hosts that are going to "travel" are packed in long tubes (like modern Pringle potato chips).

It would be judicious for a Catholic priest to bring his own hosts to ensure that they were fresh and licit (that they were made in accordance to Catholic Law)

Bill Sauder
 
Jun 4, 2003
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Hi! I believe there were three or four Greek passengers who were Greek Orthodox christians but I do not know whether there was an Orthodox priest on board. Can anyone help on this? Thanks! George from Greece ...
 
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Mary S. Lynn

Guest
In third class, especially, there was such a variety of nationalities, that, naturally, a variety of religions would have accompanied these passengers. This does not necessarily mean that a religious "head" would have been present, though (for "services"). Catholics and Protestants would have been in the majority. Greek and Russian Orthodox, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism had passenger representatives. There might have been lesser known religions represented, as well.
 

Kathy S

Member
Feb 28, 2015
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The most reasonable speculation is that the Catholic priests brought their own communion hosts, since they knew they were traveling and would probably be offering Mass on each day of the voyage. Communion hosts that are going to "travel" are packed in long tubes (like modern Pringle potato chips).

It would be judicious for a Catholic priest to bring his own hosts to ensure that they were fresh and licit (that they were made in accordance to Catholic Law)

This is a pretty old thread, hope I'm not violating any unspoken rules by bumping it. (Are you still "here," Bill?)

I have read somewhere that Fr. Byles (the only Catholic priest on board, I believe) heard confessions as the ship was sinking, although I cannot remember specifically where I read that. I wonder whether he consecrated and distributed any hosts, as a sort of viaticum.
 

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