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Cats on the Titanic

Discussion in 'Animals on the Titanic' started by Lynda Franklin, Jul 21, 2006.

  1. Jim Kalafus

    Jim Kalafus Member

    >Jim - what are you talking about? This sounds barely credible.

    Sociological television drama from 1964-1967, about a microcosmic society thrown together, thru happenstance, on an island somewhere in the south seas. When you said Henry VIII was ginger, I immediately thought of him in the context of the lovely Ginger; Hollywood actress turned drone in the microcosmic society.

    Two of the three women on the show served as potent symbols for the accelerating feminist movement... Ginger was beautiful, had a successful career and could, on occcasion, be funny. Yet, virtually every man she approached found her intimidating and rejected her and, in the end, she was reduced to doing housework and looking pretty. MaryAnn, the farm girl, did not have Ginger's career or sexual charms and, therefore, men were not intimidated by her, BUT her reward for being the "Madonna" was, of course, housework.

    The drama was also a first in that it showed, non-judgmentally, a homosexual couple, one of whom was the captain of a ship, who lived and slept together quite openly. You did not see that too often on 1964 television, and I am often surprised at the weird overtones of dominance and masochism which permeate the relationship... particular in the sequences in which the older of the two beats the younger with his hat.

    I still have trouble fathoming Henry VIII as Ginger.
     
  2. Bob Godfrey

    Bob Godfrey Member

    Not Ginger. Just ginger. As was his daughter Elizabeth I. Thanks to the French ambassador of the time, we know exactly what she looked like in her maturity:

    She was strangely attired in a dress of silver cloth, white and crimson, or silver 'gauze', as they call it. This dress had slashed sleeves lined with red taffeta, and was girt about with other little sleeves that hung down to the ground, which she was for ever twisting and untwisting. She kept the front of her dress open, and one could see the whole of her bosom, and passing low, and often she would open the front of this robe with her hands as if she was too hot. The collar of the robe was very high, and the lining of the inner part all adorned with little pendants of rubies and pearls, very many, but quite small. She had also a chain of rubies and pearls about her neck. On her head she wore a garland of the same material and beneath it a great reddish-coloured wig, with a great number of spangles of gold and silver, and hanging down over her forehead some pearls, but of no great worth. On either side of her ears hung two great curls of hair, almost down to her shoulders and within the collar of her robe, spangled as the top of her head. Her bosom is somewhat wrinkled as well as one can see for the collar that she wears round her neck, but lower down her flesh is exceeding white and delicate, so far as one could see. As for her face, it is and appears to be very aged. It is long and thin, and her teeth are very yellow and unequal, compared with what they were formerly, so they say, and on the left side less than on the right. Many of them are missing so that one cannot understand her easily when she speaks quickly. Her figure is fair and tall and graceful in whatever she does; so far as may be she keeps her dignity, yet humbly and graciously withal.
     
  3. Monica Hall

    Monica Hall Member

    Oh dear. Not a very good description. But if you're the Queen, then you would applaud Bob's last sentence. But it might be the pain of death for others for disagreeing with the rest of it. Though I think Elizabeth did her best, given difficult circumstances, to avoid mayhem. She didn't quite succeed, though. But I think she tried.

    Thank goodness I am descended from relatively healthy serfs who never saw their monarch, never knew what was really going on, managed to avoid wars, and just carried on growing vegetables and singing songs until the 19thC.
     
  4. Jim Kalafus

    Jim Kalafus Member

    "Not Ginger. Just ginger."

    Now I'm terribly confused, much like the father in the 1970s air freshener commercial whose daughter talked herself blue in the face, explaining, to no avail, that Glade was an "air CONDITIONER air conditioner" and not an "AIR CONDITIONER air conditioner."

    To be ginger yet not be Ginger. A paradox that has haunted Tina Louise for 45 years. She signed for the role, apparently believing that it would be a fast paycheck and that the pilot episode was too stupid to be picked up. And then spent three years under a black cloud because the show was, indeed, bought by a network. Jayne Mansfield was offered the role and turned it down; her manager/husband felt greener pastures lay ahead.

    I give Tina credit. How many other statuesque beauties would play an entire scene with a huge glob of broccoli stuck between her front teeth, as she did in The Stepford Wives? She ends up a fembot by the midpoint of the film, and it suffers for her loss.

    Off I go to ponder the paradox of not being Ginger, yet being ginger....
     
  5. Bob Godfrey

    Bob Godfrey Member

    You might want to ponder also, Jim, why Cilla was not black. :)
     
  6. Bob Godfrey

    Bob Godfrey Member

    And speaking of ginger actresses, especially in a shipwreck forum - but no, let's not bring her into this.
     
  7. Jim Kalafus

    Jim Kalafus Member

    Cilla Black only became Black when she ditched her birth name of Priscilla White. So, she was White, and white, and Black, but not black. And, although she hosted Blind Date forever, she was entirely sighted.
     
  8. Bob Godfrey

    Bob Godfrey Member

    That's right. She was Black and White. And ginger, of course. Unlike Barry White, who was resolutely black.
     
  9. Jim Kalafus

    Jim Kalafus Member

    >She was Black and White. And ginger, of course

    Ginger? No, I'm fairly certain that Tina Louise has a "lock" on that part, unless Cilla Black did it in a U.K. version.
     
  10. Bob Godfrey

    Bob Godfrey Member

    Not Ginger. Just ginger. I have a strange feeling of deja vu.
     
  11. Jim Kalafus

    Jim Kalafus Member

    >I have a strange feeling of deja vu.

    OMG, Bob. Have you ever pondered developing your psychic powers? Dea vu is a sign that they are there!
     
  12. Bob Godfrey

    Bob Godfrey Member

    The problem with deja vu is that nobody can tell you anything about it that you haven't heard before.
     
  13. >>But it wasn't so easy for young married women to just vanish. No place to go.<<

    Unfortunately, there were places to go. The slave trade was alive and well in just about any century and this one was no different. Of course, a shallow unmarked grave wasn't out of the question either.

    >>How awful if his eye fell on you as an attractive mate and potential mother of a son.<<

    Yeah, two out of six lost their heads over Henry VIII...literally! He took ladykilling to some gruesome extremes.
     
  14. First they're being orange-ist towards me and now they're calling me, and I quote, "A fat, syphilitic bastard." Right, that's it (cue Queenie pink fit) I'm off to go and throw the toys out of the pram....

    As for that description of Queen Elizabeth I, I've met a few drag queens up our local pub who match that almost to a tee.
     
  15. Monica Hall

    Monica Hall Member

    Put those toys back in at once, Richard. I was only trying to reassure you that not all fat, syphilitic bastards were ginger. Some were dark or fair, or even bald I expect. I'm rather on the reddish side myself ...

    As for Elizabeth, I'm sure foreign ambassadors must have been warned in advance. After all, meeting a half naked old lady adorned in ridiculous amounts of jewels, and with wooden teeth plugged in between the gaps, and who has the power of life or death, can't have been easy. Clever girl, though, she wrote and spoke 3 languages fluently by the age of 9. Mind you, since the alternative occupations for one's time were probably praying and embroidery, especially after my mother had been beheaded, I think I'd have had my head in the language texts too. You'd never have known when you'd need to be able to understand exactly what foreigners were saying to you ... rather than rely on 'advisors'.
     
  16. Bob Godfrey

    Bob Godfrey Member

  17. Bob Godfrey

    Bob Godfrey Member

    Lots of cats are ginger. Including, no doubt, ships' cats. Just thought I'd mention that.
     
  18. Monica Hall

    Monica Hall Member

  19. Bob Godfrey

    Bob Godfrey Member

    Don't quite know how to respond to that suggestion, but thanks for sharing.
     
  20. Paul Rogers

    Paul Rogers Member