Cecil B Demille on Titanic extra material


May 3, 2005
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On the extra material on the set of Titanic DVD's there is a short clip of Cecil B. Demille promoting a movie in which every time the name of the movie is mentioned, "Titanic" is inserted.
What was the name of the movie Mr. Demille was mentioning ? It's on Disc #3 in my copy.
 
May 3, 2005
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Hi George,

And thanks for your post. I would think it was probably something of a promotional trailer for a movie made some time in the 1930's or 1940's and most likely a talkie since Demille is definitely talking. LOL. I have seen a photo which appeared in one of the Dallas papers sometime in the 1940's of Demille talking to local critics and he looks to be about the same age as that in the film clip on the Titanic DVD. If I could only read lips it would be simple !....Any ET fans out there able to do this ? Have to look at this to see if there is a reference to any movies in the clip.
 
May 3, 2005
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Hi again, George-

Just looking at the clip again.:
A few other clues:
There are shots of a 1934 calendar flipping through up to about May.
Shot of a screen in a theater with theater audience showing the Paramont opening logo.
Scene of Demille behind a camera of the period.
His speech begins, "You know, this isn't a fantasy. This is history."...and as mentioned previously "Titanic" is bleeped in whenever the name of the movie was apparently mentioned.

This is in a section on DVD #3 of the 3 DVD "Special Collector's Edition" labeled "Crew Video".

It's all in black and white for the Demille shot with some of Cameron in color inserted in between.
 
Can you imagine DeMille making a Titanic film on the scale of The Ten Commandments? Given that that film was so spectacular and huge, I can only imagine what he would have done with the Titanic disaster!

Other directors I'd love to have seen do a film on the disaster would have been William Wyler (Cleopatra and Ben-Hur remake) or Fred Niblo (original silent Ben-Hur).
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>Can you imagine DeMille making a Titanic film on the scale of The Ten Commandments?<<

Yes I can, with Charlton Heston as the larger-then-life hero and a story line which bears little resemblance to the hysterical historical reality.
 
May 27, 2007
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Hi Robert,

quote:

I would think it was probably something of a promotional trailer for a movie made some time in the 1930's or 1940's and most likely a talkie since DeMille is definitely talking.

And-
quote:

A few other clues:
There are shots of a 1934 calendar flipping through up to about May.
It's probably Cavalcade(1934)then.
happy.gif


http://www.jimusnr.com/Cavalcade.html
 
May 27, 2007
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Your Welcome Robert,
Cavalcade was quite a movie for it's day. It was a saga like Gone With the Wind.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavalcade_(film)
(Cut and paste folks these Film links never work right.
sad.gif
)

Actually the Saga or cross generation stories have always been quite popular. From the day's of the Vikings and Beowulf to Cavalcade and Gone With The Wind to The 13th Warrior which is basically Beowulf retold to Edward Rutherford Novels. He's got a dozen Saga Novels about places and Families that liive in those places.

"The Crusades" (1935)? Never heard of that one? Will have to get from the library. Sounds like the perfect Saga Story.
 
May 3, 2005
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Hi George-

Here is a bit I found on "The Crusades"...since it was apparently in production in 1934 it might have been released in 1935, at least that's my supposition.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0026249/

Also note, in the dubbing of "Titanic", "The Crusades", "Cavalcade" and "Titanic" all have three syllables so the lip movements might be similar for dubbing "Titanic".
 
May 3, 2005
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Hello once more George-

"Cavalcade" ?...Is this the movie where the couple move away from the railings, revealing a life preserver labeled "Titanic" ?

The following one has nothing to do with "Titanic" and it's admittedly of local interest only, but it's my favorite "Saga Story" from the standpoint of being something of a "1936 Time Capsule."

There are also scenes from another "Cavalcade" in this movie. ("The Cavalcade of Texas", a historical pageant produced on "the world's largest outdoor stage" at the exposition.)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0027361/
 

Will C. White

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Apr 18, 2007
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If you want a spectacular movie about RMS Titanic, think about a now almost forgotten genius who was a DeMille contemporary, and took on far tougher material-how about Erich Von Stroheim?
 

Mike Poirier

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Dec 31, 2004
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Well De Mille did the Lusitania in the Little American with Mary Pickford. It was over acted and over-the-top. Rita Jolivet was a good friend of De Mille's and must have been mad enough to make her own film since the character was a Rita rip off.
 
May 27, 2007
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Hello Robert

Thanks for the link to The Crusades.

quote:

"Cavalcade" ?...Is this the movie where the couple move away from the railings, revealing a life preserver labeled "Titanic" ?

I believe so. I've never seen the movie but read about it on the website. Actually I think Cavalcade was a British Picture that was released in Britain in 1933 and the USA in 1934 hence the confusing release dates for the film. DeMille might of been plugging the film to American Audiences. The screen play was written by Noel Coward.

Hello Will,
quote:

Erich Von Stroheim
I saw his masterful silent Greed 1924 with Zasu Pitts. I recommend this film.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greed_(film)
(Cut and paste. These links almost never work)

I could see Von Stroheim directing a Film about Titanic and it being a good one.

Mike,

I too thought the film DeMille was plugging might of been the Little American but Robert gave me the important clue that DeMille was talking and that a calender said May 1934 in the background. So I bet it's a safe bet it wasn't The Little American a silent that DeMille was plugging in 1934 but was probably Cavalcade. Which might of done well in Britain but passed under the American movie going public's rador in '34?​
 

Mike Poirier

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Dec 31, 2004
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Hi George

Actually, I was just making a little aside, not really a guess on what DeMille was planning later on. I should have prefaced my comments with that. Should you ever see the Little American- oh boy... not so great.
 
May 27, 2007
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Mike,

I finally saw The Little American and the film seemed alright but it did have it's slow parts and its hokey parts but the film had great scenes of the Lusitania sinking.

It must of been popular for a print to have been saved although that might of been Pickford or DeMille's doing. Too bad Rita didn't preserve her films for future generations. I wonder how Lest We Forget did at the Box Office compared with The Little American?
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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>I wonder how Lest We Forget did at the Box Office compared with The Little American?

Hard to judge. It played a lot longer, but also cost a lot more to produce.
 
May 3, 2005
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Hello George-

>>Actually I think Cavalcade was a British Picture that was released in Britain in 1933 and the USA in 1934 hence the confusing release dates for the film. DeMille might of been plugging the film to American Audiences. The screen play was written by Noel Coward.<<

Righto ! The British-Noel Coward "Cavalcade" was the movie I had in mind. (There is the clip of the scene on one of the "Titanic" DVD's in my collection. I'm not familiar with the Cecil B. Demille "Cavalcade".)
 
May 27, 2007
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Robert,
quote:

I'm not familiar with the Cecil B. Demille "Cavalcade".)

I should of been more clear in that the Studio or Producer which handled the American Release of Noel Coward's Cavalcade might of got DeMille to plug the film to American Audiences or DeMille might of done it on his own initiative?

Jim,

quote:

Hard to judge. It played a lot longer, but also cost a lot more to produce.

True and Lest We Forget was also playing in towns after the Little American had come and gone. Hence it might of had to play longer because folks might of been leery of spending money to see Lest We Forget when they had already seen DeMille and Pickford's The Little American which you and Mike Poirier have pointed out is basically the same story.​
 
Feb 24, 2004
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Curious coincidence: Noel Coward's "Cavalcade" (the film) premiered on April 15, 1933.

It was made by Fox, which apparently sent a team to London to film the stage play as a production guide. It won 3 Oscars and 1 nomination. To this day, its most remembered scene is where the man and the woman step away from the ship's railing.
 

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