Christie's auction 25 June 2008

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Eric Longo

Member
Hello Ian,

I've been hearing this too and have a few times before. From what I understand, It was not the weight but the buoyancy of the jacket combined with the velocity of the impact from jumping which forced the head back and/or up breaking the neck etc.. Others would know more about this and could speak to it, but that is what I'm recalling. Also, if memory serves, this or something similar has been mentioned in two other prominent disasters of the same period.
I see the story you linked to has the "It apparently was discovered on the Halifax shoreline after the ship sank off Newfoundland in 1912." version of the "provenance" - apparently? As has been stated here and elsewhere that notion is apparently impossible. What else had been recovered washed up from those shorelines?

Best,
Eric
 
E

Eric Longo

Member
Hello Iain,

apologies for spelling you name incorrectly
Sad
I've not been sleeping well and it is catching up with me.

Best,
Eric
 
K

Kevin Saucier

Guest
Here is a picture of the ocean surface currents for the concerned area(s). From reading, these currents have changed little for several centuries. (this was also posted on another Titanic website).

With this, we can get a better understanding if the life vest could have floated from the wreck site to the beach it was found.

132505


Here is where Titanic was found:

132506



Kevin Saucier
 
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Eric Longo

Member
Hi Kevin,

if my eyes are not failing me that does not look very good - in this case, a picture seems to be worth $68,500! ;)
Excellent work!

Best and thanks,
Eric
 
S

Steve Santini

Member
Excellent map.

I imagine had it been made public and available to the media who covered this sale the promoters of the sale would have found yet another way to explain how the guy got the jacket.

Never let the truth get in the way of big money ! LOL

Steve Santini
 
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